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Old 04-23-2009, 01:16 AM   #11
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A lot of it has to do with the shooter as well. You are going to shoot better with a gun you can handle.

If you are new to shooting you don't want to go out and start shooting a 500 smith with your buddies dino stomper 450gr bullet rounds you want to start at the 22lr and work your way up to the bigger ones.

I started shooting 22lr at about the age or 7 by the time I was 9 I was shooting full power 357mag loads. Granted the Revolver was big 8" barrel made me fell like Dirty Harry.

Some has to do with how big the gun is. A 2" snubbie in 44 mag is going to move more with you shoot it vs a 2" barreled 38 spec shooting low end loads.

Now the best thing about rimfres is they are dirt cheap to shoot. I go threw 500 to 1000 rounds of 22 in a single range session. I will shoot 200 45acp in my 1911 and I am done. cost me to much to be burning them up like that.

the Federal bulk 22lr is .026 cents a round that is almost 3 cents a round. I reload my 45acp and it is still 8 or 9 cents per round. that is 4 times as much money.

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Old 04-23-2009, 01:26 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rimfire McNutjob View Post
A lot of it has to do with the shooter as well. You are going to shoot better with a gun you can handle.

If you are new to shooting you don't want to go out and start shooting a 500 smith with your buddies dino stomper 450gr bullet rounds you want to start at the 22lr and work your way up to the bigger ones.

I started shooting 22lr at about the age or 7 by the time I was 9 I was shooting full power 357mag loads. Granted the Revolver was big 8" barrel made me fell like Dirty Harry.

Some has to do with how big the gun is. A 2" snubbie in 44 mag is going to move more with you shoot it vs a 2" barreled 38 spec shooting low end loads.

Now the best thing about rimfres is they are dirt cheap to shoot. I go threw 500 to 1000 rounds of 22 in a single range session. I will shoot 200 45acp in my 1911 and I am done. cost me to much to be burning them up like that.

the Federal bulk 22lr is .026 cents a round that is almost 3 cents a round. I reload my 45acp and it is still 8 or 9 cents per round. that is 4 times as much money.
I would like to know how you reload .45 ACP for 8 or 9 cents... unless you've had bullets, powder, and primers laying around for a very long time. Jacketed 45 bullets are about 13 cents each, primer is 4.5 cents, and depending on grains and powder type you're looking at about 6 to 9 cents. and that's assuming you are using your own brass. ***What's your secret?***
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Old 04-23-2009, 03:43 AM   #13
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Do what JD said, go to the range and rent as many guns as you can. Also, its a good idea to take a firearms safety course. And keep asking questions! There are no dumb questions, just dumb answers. I think all of us were in your situation at one time.

If I were to recommend your first handgun, you should buy something in 22lr. Learn the basics of shooting. The same principals apply to no matter what caliber you are shooting. The best part about 22lr ammo is its cheap! You can get 500 rounds for less than $20 as opposed to 50 rounds of 45 ACP for $30. You can shoot all day and not break the bank.

When you think your ready to move on to a larger caliber, you can always trade in whatever gun you bought towards your purchase. Although I think a lot of us still have our first gun .

Either one of these will do just fine. I personally have the Walther P22 and love it. Simple field strip, easy to clean, and its just like every other handgun in that it has a slide. (thats the only reason I don't like the Mark III)

Ruger 22/45™ Mark III™*Rimfire Autoloading*Pistol (KP678HMKIII) Overview

Product: P22 Pistol - 3.4"

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Old 04-23-2009, 01:41 PM   #14
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Don't trade or sell your guns... just add to your collection.

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Old 04-23-2009, 11:51 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dnthmn2004 View Post
Do what JD said, go to the range and rent as many guns as you can. Also, its a good idea to take a firearms safety course. And keep asking questions! There are no dumb questions, just dumb answers. I think all of us were in your situation at one time.

If I were to recommend your first handgun, you should buy something in 22lr. Learn the basics of shooting. The same principals apply to no matter what caliber you are shooting. The best part about 22lr ammo is its cheap! You can get 500 rounds for less than $20 as opposed to 50 rounds of 45 ACP for $30. You can shoot all day and not break the bank.

When you think your ready to move on to a larger caliber, you can always trade in whatever gun you bought towards your purchase. Although I think a lot of us still have our first gun .

Either one of these will do just fine. I personally have the Walther P22 and love it. Simple field strip, easy to clean, and its just like every other handgun in that it has a slide. (thats the only reason I don't like the Mark III)

Ruger 22/45™ Mark III™*Rimfire Autoloading*Pistol (KP678HMKIII) Overview

Product: P22 Pistol - 3.4"
As stated first and foremost make sure you have training for the firearm you plan on using. So many people go out and buy something from a Brand store and these people could care less if you know anything at all?
Find a local shooting club and trainer to teach you the right way!
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Old 04-30-2009, 05:36 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt g View Post
the .45 ACP round... will leave a massive wound channel and liquefy vital organs near the wound channel.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark F View Post
A point blank 45 would have removed the entire innards of her skull.
Are these just gross internet exaggerations? Or are you guys being serious? Liquify vital organs? Leave her skull empty?


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When it comes to taking down a Bad Guy CALIBER is EVERYTHING and shot placement is the icing on the cake.
Not true at all. I can't stress this enough. Bullets aren't magical, especially not from common handgun cartridges. At handgun velocities, the amount of tissue damaged is equal to the amount of tissue crushed, which is only proportional to the diameter of the expanded bullet and the depth to which it penetrates. The best .45acp bullet is still going to do nothing more than leave a ~penny-sized hole where you aim it.

Chuck Taylor's ASAA -Stopping Power

Handgun Stopping Power: A Dialogue

Stopping power - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Myth of Energy Transfer

Energy Transfer and other Bullet Bullistics


*edit*

And to the original poster, the reason people buy smaller calibers is for the lower recoil, smaller size, or in the case of 9mm (compared to larger pistol calibers) and .22lr (in the case of ALL calibers), cheaper practice. However, no, caliber his little (if nothing) to do with accuracy.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:32 PM   #17
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As far as the results you get with a size of bullet, it has to do with the speed at which you push it. During the American civil war, the bullet of choice was a heavy, pure lead bullet, 500 plus grains in weight going along at a maximum velocity of 753fps with an ennergy of 525 foot pounds at 100 yds. This took arms and legs off if you were unlucky to get hit. Bullets for killing men today, have been becoming smaller over the years and pushed at higher speeds to achieve what the civil war bullet could do by pin balling around inside a body achieving similar damage. Today, for practical war reasons, the smaller bullet pushed at a faster speed means lighter rounds, which means that more rounds can be carried in a soldiers' combat load, when most soldiers have the capability for automatic fire. But you don't have the same concerns as a soldier, so pick any size bullet you like to shoot. As far as what each bullet is said to do be able to do, it depends on what you what to do with it. You wouldn't want to use a .22 on a charging elephant(unless you had previously kissed your loved ones goodbye), or want to shoot a squirel with an elephant gun. Your choice of bullet should be about what you want to do with it, target, hunting, or defense, and if you can shoot that cal. proficiently. Do some more research, fire the type you are interested in before you buy one. I will bet you that there are some nice S&W m29s out there because somebody saw one in the movies,"the most powerful handgun in the world" bought one, fired it, found it to be too much for their tastes, and putt it away in the closet to never shoot again. (Of course, if you did, a S&W m29 is worth more today than what you would have paid originally. But I digress, that had nothing to do with the original discussion, sorry.)

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Old 12-08-2012, 05:54 PM   #18
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Bandit,

JD and the other are right on he money as to their great advise. Getting in on this thread late in the game I just wanted to share my two cents. Being new as you advised, like them I would advise going to a range and trying several weapons. Bottom line as I take it you are speaking of two weapons instead of just one. One for self defense (CCW) also possibly and one for shooting and learning. I would highly recommend looking into a Ruger 22 Semi-Auto Target Pistols or the Browning Buckmark type target pistols to learn basic handgun safety and shooting fundamentals. And also to achieve proficiency and success in the beginning while you are learning. That is very important as a beginner! Also they have hardly any recoil at all! One of the biggest mistakes new handgun shooters make is going with a larger caliber weapon which costs more to shoot, are less comfortable to shoot and also can easily create bad habits. Like flinching for example which is hard to cure as a new shooter. While with the 22 cal pistols they are inexpensive to shoot which means you will shoot more, they are comfortable to shoot and as Dillinger stated easier to control without developing bad habits. Later after you get some experience under you belt then acquire a larger caliber for personal defense and future CCW. By the way! NEVER SHOOT WITHOUT GOOD EAR PROTECTION! and especially with being a new shooter! Good luck and all of us are here for assistance when needed. JD and some here are very educated in most all areas of weapons and the shooting sport!
Good luck on your selection!

03

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Old 12-08-2012, 07:07 PM   #19
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Gents- the thread is from 2009. I think he got his answer a few years ago.

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