Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   General Handgun Discussion (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/)
-   -   Presciption glasses and shooting - question (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/presciption-glasses-shooting-question-87897/)

kirbinster 03-31-2013 05:04 PM

Presciption glasses and shooting - question
 
I wear glasses for distance, but only use them when driving. But I find that when I wear them now that I am just North of 50 I have difficulty focusing on close objects. When I want to check my phone I take them off to be able to see things clearly. So, my question is what should I do when shooting. I have been wearing the glasses so I can see the target accurately but I am not able to focus very well on the front sight. I can see it fine, but it is not sharp - does that matter. I tried shooting today with plain safety glasses instead. Doing that I can focus sharply on the sights but the target is kind of fuzzy. So, which option do you think is better?

MisterMcCool 03-31-2013 05:07 PM

Bifocals.......

HOSSFLY 03-31-2013 05:09 PM

Been wearing glasses for distance & shooting over 40 yrs-
Long story short- I want to see what i'm shooting at clearly-

Jagermeister 03-31-2013 05:11 PM

When you sharply focus on the front sight, the object will naturally becoming fuzzy. It is not your eyesight, it is your humanity. No worries. I focus on the object first, then on the front sights. Remember to point your thumbs at the target to help keep the gun straight.

kirbinster 03-31-2013 05:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jagermeister (Post 1198161)
When you sharply focus on the front sight, the object will naturally becoming fuzzy. It is not your eyesight, it is your humanity. No worries. I focus on the object first, then on the front sights. Remember to point your thumbs at the target to help keep the gun straight.

Thanks, but I think it is the eyes not being able to focus up close with the distance glasses on. I know that starting about three or four years ago I noticed that I was taking them off when I wanted to read a text or email on my phone. I guess it does not matter how sharp the front sight is if I am focusing on it rather than the target -- I think?

MattShlock 03-31-2013 05:28 PM

I love the internet...

The correct answer is that the front sight is what you focus on. Shooting A Rifle: 101. Sorry. For the rest of y'all; Granpappy's Lesson One fer shootin'.

The target will be out-of-focus fuzzy. Young people can focus back and forth so quickly on both front sight and target that mentally it is as though they are simultaneously focusing on both. That slows down with age as does the ability to focus at both long and close distance in any case. You need to see the front sight clearly. The rear sight will appear ghostly (as in ghost ring sight) and the target will not be sharp. By the way, this is why optics are used more as one ages and for super-precision shooting all the time -- with them anyone can easily see both target and "sight" (dot or crosshairs) in sharp focus, maybe even magnified.

And before somebody twangs "but ya hasta know whats yer shooting at"... Yeah, that's right.

danf_fl 04-01-2013 01:08 AM

Concentrate of front sight.
I have a pair of shooting glasses that are bifocal in nature, but the reading/front sight distance is clear (cost a little bit, but worth it). The top portion is for "far" to identify the target, then I transition to the front sight.
I do not have lines (progressive), so the target does not "jump".

They also work great on the computer.

MattShlock 04-01-2013 02:49 AM

Danf_fl;
The problem there is that you should be looking through the center of the lens at the front sight. With your head tilted downward on the rifle (or shotgun) stock shooting-specific eyeglasses (frames and prescription lenses) are designed to ride high on the face -- the bridge of the nose is farther down vs. standard frames where they are usually about level with the temples. See below. Regular frames/lenses only work with offhand pistol and even there bifocals are not ideal...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQ786SEM3Yg

trip286 04-01-2013 03:07 AM

Just try several different methods and stick with what works best for you. It ain't that complicated.

BillM 04-01-2013 04:04 AM

I've got a pair of shooting glasses set up for what they call "monovision".

Dominant eye has a lens that brings the front sight in crystal clear. Non
dominant eye has a distance lens.

Takes me about 15 minutes to get used to them on match day (I normally
wear varilux no line bi-focals).

Sounds like in your case your regular prescription to see the target, and
a clear lens for the front sight?

I'm on the high side of 60----and these glasses are what has kept me
competitive is USPSA iron sight divisions.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:14 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.