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Old 02-10-2010, 05:18 PM   #11
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Im not a big guy in anyway (about 155lbs) but my .40 doesn't have a strong kick to it, I wouldn't say its a hard gun to get use to. No one told me to start out with a .40 cal, A good deal just came around and I made that decision myself.

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Old 02-10-2010, 05:25 PM   #12
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Im not a big guy in anyway (about 155lbs) but my .40 doesn't have a strong kick to it, I wouldn't say its a hard gun to get use to. No one told me to start out with a .40 cal, A good deal just came around and I made that decision myself.
I saw your post about the 4006 you picked up. Had one myself for a time and as I said early on in this thread .40 from a duty sized steel gun is pleasant to shoot...
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Old 02-10-2010, 05:28 PM   #13
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I saw your post about the 4006 you picked up. Had one myself for a time and as I said early on in this thread .40 from a duty sized steel gun is pleasant to shoot...
yea the gun being a bit heavier does help hold the recoil I am assuming. My buddies Glock 22 seems a bit lighter but has about the same kick and has a tad bit more accuracy from what I can tell.
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Old 02-10-2010, 06:10 PM   #14
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When I bought my .40, I went with that caliber basically because it was within my price range at the time and it was much bigger and better than the .25 I had at the time.

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Old 02-10-2010, 06:13 PM   #15
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Although it is all personal preference, if one was was not experienced in handguns and had not had a lot of shooting experience, I would indeed recommend a 9mm as a first starter pistol and pathway to shooting fundamentals. I fired plenty of them damn Beretta 92's in the military. A .22 pistol would be a good starter too, but as noted, the mindset today of most, is bigger is better, even for the beginner, and that is not always necessarily true. People do reason that a .40 would be a medial compromise to a 9mm and a .45 pistol.

Shooting skills are acquired and learned through much practice and repetition. Once those skills and familiarization are obtained and one is comfortable with handling a particular firearm, then move up in caliber. It is all a learned progression to reach where one is ultimately comfortable in handling a particular firearm caliber with confidence, accuracy, skill, and more importantly, the gross and fine muscle memory needed under pressure.

The firearm should become an extension of one's own hand. This should be mastered and true with any personally trained handgun caliber handled, and shooting adjustments should be minimal, if any. Personal preference, affordability, and satisfaction of operational comfort, is ultimately the final goal.

Again, just my humble opinion here, and 0.02 worth of education.


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Old 02-10-2010, 06:23 PM   #16
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As always Jack, you're advice and counsel is welcomed by all. I have nothing against the .40; however, I see lots of newbies wind up unhappy with .40 as a starting caliber - hence my thread...

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Old 02-10-2010, 06:44 PM   #17
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I don't know how other towns and states are but here in S.W. Oregon when ammo was getting scarce .40 S&W ammo was the last one still on the shelves and when ammo started showing up again the .40 S&W ammo is the first and in greatest quantities. Many times when I go into the Grants Pass Wal-Mart the only pistol ammo on the shelves is .22 short, .40 S&W and once and awhile .25 ACP. I haven't seen .45 ACP or 9mm for quite a long time, other gun shops may have those ammo's but they will be premium priced to where I couldn't afford to shoot very many. Though I'd love to own a Springfield 1911 TRP or a Para Ord. 1911 in .45 ACP and had the money to do so I'd probably go for another .40, probably a Kahr MK40 or just get a Mini 14, which has been on my wish list. Considering .223 ammo has been plentiful in all the local gun stores, I've been hinting to my wife that this is a good idea.

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Old 02-10-2010, 09:19 PM   #18
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I'm pretty new to firearms and do own a .40sw. My reasoning was to get into a larger caliber that was both affordable and easy to find when the shelves were pretty empty. I actually have a 357sig (less practical than a 40 for sure), and added a 40 barrel for cheaper plinking. The two handle about the same.

That being said, when I went brousing around for my first handgun, if anything I was discouraged from choosing the 40sw because it was dangerous to handload should I ever head in that direction. The first two guns I bought were a 22lr and 9mm. The 22lr was a Sig 226 that converted to the 357/40. Hindsight 20/20, I'd have probably selected a p220 22lr with a 45acp conversion.

I'm no expert and hardly a seasoned veteran of the firearm world. I do plan to add a 1911 soon enough. But I'm pretty content with the 40sw. Maybe it's my own ignorance and I just don't know what I'm missing out on, but I can't say that I'm dissatisifed.

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Old 02-10-2010, 10:53 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by sweeper22 View Post
I'm pretty new to firearms and do own a .40sw. My reasoning was to get into a larger caliber that was both affordable and easy to find when the shelves were pretty empty. I actually have a 357sig (less practical than a 40 for sure), and added a 40 barrel for cheaper plinking. The two handle about the same.

That being said, when I went brousing around for my first handgun, if anything I was discouraged from choosing the 40sw because it was dangerous to handload should I ever head in that direction. The first two guns I bought were a 22lr and 9mm. The 22lr was a Sig 226 that converted to the 357/40. Hindsight 20/20, I'd have probably selected a p220 22lr with a 45acp conversion.

I'm no expert and hardly a seasoned veteran of the firearm world. I do plan to add a 1911 soon enough. But I'm pretty content with the 40sw. Maybe it's my own ignorance and I just don't know what I'm missing out on, but I can't say that I'm dissatisifed.
The only danger for handloading for the 40 S&W is if you have a polygonal barrel and use lead bullets, supposedly they build up lead deposits quickly which increases friction which leads to dangerous pressures which can blow out an unsupported case. By unsupported, it means there are areas in the chamber due to long feed ramp or a large cut out in the chamber for the shell extractor that leave the thinner area of the case exposed. Supposedly Glock has this problem with original barrels, Aftermarket barrels with groves and lands "shouldn't" be a problem. My XDm and Stoeger Cougar, both 40's do not have any unsupported areas. I have seen some pics on the internet of blown Glocks, do a search on Kaboom. I handload for both of my 40's with 165 grain Lead TC bullets as well as jacketed hollow points and full metal jacked bullets and have yet to have bulged cases or flattened primers which are sure signs of higher pressures, but then I don't load to the max and I use powders that have the lowest pressure for the best velocity available.
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Old 02-10-2010, 10:57 PM   #20
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I've had the luxury of owning a few of the same guns in .40 and another caliber. I've had XD subcompacts in 9mm & .40, a Kahr PM9 & PM40, a Kahr P40 & P45, and I find the recoil impulse of the .40 in any small platform to be not conducive to fast accurate shooting. The muzzle flip and "snap" is just not worth the moderate gain in ballistics over the 9mm IMHO.

The reason I bring this up is that a common thread I see is a newbie buying his first gun and it's a .40 and the story doesn't end well. On my local GA forum, a fella decided his dream gun would be a Walther PPS in .40 - and many of us regulars suggested he look at the PPS in 9mm instead. Of course our advice (based on real experience) was ignored.

He sung the praises of this little cannon for a few weeks, then nothing for a few weeks, and then the gun was listed in the buy/sell/trade section - he was looking for a smallish gun in 9mm...
It always amazes me that folks will sell a gun instead of getting proper instruction in how to use it. If he couldn't handle a .40 PPS I doubt he'll do any better with the 9mm version. There are no uncontrolable handguns, just shooters that can't control them... I learned that by watching a rather famous pistol expert empty out a 4" .500 S&W FAST with next to no muzzle rise. Not very dificult if you learn how and practice.
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