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Old 06-17-2014, 11:14 PM   #11
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If they are target shooting I tell them to get a rule book and attend some matches to see what everyone else is shooting.

If they have to ask what gun to get to hunt with I just change the subject. They really need to do some research. You have to be a good hunter to take big game with a pistol.
just because people want a pistol, or any firearm for that matter for target shooting, does it mean they automatically plan on competing.

many people like to do informal target shooting and as such are not limited to what the rule book says.

lots of people do nothing more than informal target shooting and never plan on competing, simply for the enjoyment of shooting and getting to be a better shooter.
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:30 PM   #12
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With 22lr so hard to come by, I would hesitate to recommend one at this time. If a new shooter is looking for a home defense weapon, I would suggest a good quality 4" 357 revolver with 38 spl ammo for a start. Keep It Simple Stupid. You dont have the break in issues of a semi auto and it will accept a lot of different power levels and bullet types without feed problems. You also have enough weight to keep the recoil down. Gender and size does not matter. My petite wife learned on a 4" S&W 19 with 38 spl. Once a new shooter has gotten the basics, he or she can move to a different platform or larger caliber if they desire. Keep in mind a new semi auto requires a good number of rounds for break in and proof of reliability. A new shooter may not be willing or able to do what is necessary to run a semi auto.

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Old 06-17-2014, 11:39 PM   #13
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With 22lr so hard to come by, I would hesitate to recommend one at this time. If a new shooter is looking for a home defense weapon, I would suggest a good quality 4" 357 revolver with 38 spl ammo for a start. Keep It Simple Stupid. You dont have the break in issues of a semi auto and it will accept a lot of different power levels and bullet types without feed problems. You also have enough weight to keep the recoil down. Gender and size does not matter. My petite wife learned on a 4" S&W 19 with 38 spl. Once a new shooter has gotten the basics, he or she can move to a different platform or larger caliber if they desire. Keep in mind a new semi auto requires a good number of rounds for break in and proof of reliability. A new shooter may not be willing or able to do what is necessary to run a semi auto.
very good points JTJ.

nice thing about a revolver in 357 Magnum, is they can go up in power factor of the loads without having to go to a different pistol. just change the loads they are shooting.

another nice thing about a revolver, is they can shoot shotshells much easier than a semi-auto can and it makes them good for pests if a person lives in a rural area.

my wife as well has no problems in shooting a 357 Magnum, even with hot Magnum loads. she does quite well with my 4" barreled and my father's 8.5" barreled revolvers. she does get tired quicker from shooting his, but that is from the much longer barrel and the weight, and not the recoil. a few years ago, the first time she shot my father's 357, we were both impressed with her accuracy at 25 yards with that revolver.
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Old 06-20-2014, 03:22 AM   #14
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I'm about to buy my first gun. My husband loves a 22 anything, but you can't find .22lr ammo, and 22 short has limits on how much you can buy. There are no ranges close to me for me to rent and try out different guns. I knew I wanted a 9mm, semi auto, but it had to fit my smallish hands. The ONLY one I found that felt good was the Ruger LC9. In fact when I held it it was like it had found a home . The only thing I was worried about was recoil, but several people here set my mind at ease. I rarely see a 9mm being suggested for new shooters but I'm not sure why...

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Old 06-20-2014, 05:44 AM   #15
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With 22lr so hard to come by, I would hesitate to recommend one at this time. If a new shooter is looking for a home defense weapon, I would suggest a good quality 4" 357 revolver with 38 spl ammo for a start. Keep It Simple Stupid. You dont have the break in issues of a semi auto and it will accept a lot of different power levels and bullet types without feed problems. You also have enough weight to keep the recoil down. Gender and size does not matter. My petite wife learned on a 4" S&W 19 with 38 spl. Once a new shooter has gotten the basics, he or she can move to a different platform or larger caliber if they desire. Keep in mind a new semi auto requires a good number of rounds for break in and proof of reliability. A new shooter may not be willing or able to do what is necessary to run a semi auto.
I like shooting .38 Special out of my .357's, too, but I differ in my opinion of what I recommend to new shooters. Hand placement under bore is a matter of simple physics and a revolver doesn't do as well as a modern semi-auto with ammunition of the same power level.

Not that it matters for learning to shoot, but the .357 chambered revolvers generally weigh more and will always be larger than semi-autos that fire ammunition of the same power level, for a given barrel length.

As it relates to concealed carry handguns, any modern double stack pistol compared to a revolver of equivalent size will have near to or more than twice the capacity of the revolver and an 8 shot .357 is about as concealable as Dirty Harry's M29.

I do recommend revolvers to people who have injuries that affect dexterity because depressing the cylinder latch is easier than operating a slide. That said, if you use the proper technique all adults I've ever seen who were not disabled had little issue with operating a slide.

A pistol like a Glock or M&P doesn't have a break-in period. It either works from the box or there's something wrong with it. Quite plainly, guns that have break-in periods were not properly built for reliability. If you're only going to use it for target shooting, then anything that you fancy is fine.

Any gun you intend to use for self defense should be tested with the exact ammunition you intend to use when you carry the gun, period. Before you get to the point where you are going to attempt to use a handgun of any type for self or home defense, you should have fired many hundreds and preferably many thousands of rounds of ammunition through it.

Regarding simplicity or KISS, with a revolver you load ammunition, you latch the cylinder, you pull the trigger, and it generally fires. With a pistol like a Glock or M&P, you load ammunition, you operate the slide, you pull the trigger, and it generally fires. Neither are terribly complicated.
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Old 06-20-2014, 11:28 AM   #16
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I do recommend revolvers to people who have injuries that affect dexterity because depressing the cylinder latch is easier than operating a slide. That said, if you use the proper technique all adults I've ever seen who were not disabled had little issue with operating a slide.

I have CP and I just hold the gun in my weak hand, and pull the slide with my strong hand.


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Old 06-28-2014, 06:41 AM   #17
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I always answer the same, "figure it out for yourself."

I've always believed in self edification in every realm and every way. It's a tale as old as time... give a man a fish, blah blah blah; teach a man to fish, Yada Yada Yada.

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Old 06-28-2014, 07:44 AM   #18
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I'm about to buy my first gun. My husband loves a 22 anything, but you can't find .22lr ammo, and 22 short has limits on how much you can buy. There are no ranges close to me for me to rent and try out different guns. I knew I wanted a 9mm, semi auto, but it had to fit my smallish hands. The ONLY one I found that felt good was the Ruger LC9. In fact when I held it it was like it had found a home . The only thing I was worried about was recoil, but several people here set my mind at ease. I rarely see a 9mm being suggested for new shooters but I'm not sure why...
LoniJo

You've accomplished the first hurdle.. You researched the 22 and the 9mm correctly.

2nd Hurdle You found a pistol that's fits your hand! "HOME"

Given the market for 22lr as it is, you can buy many guns in that caliber but what good is it if ammo is still a hit or miss challenge. So Go with the next best option 9MM...

9MM Easy re-coil, Ammo is very available, Proven defensive and offensive caliber. Cheap to handload for. Over all easy caliber for new shooters to master.

Plenty of reputable and not so reputable pistol manufacturers. The Ruger LC9 is a good small frame pistol to CC with and for its size it carries a good number of cartridges. If that is your intended primary use.

There are plenty of larger frames 9mm pistols available, New and used.. Never over look a used pistol some real gems can be found for way less than new.

*The reason why 9mm don't get the recommendations is.ost experienced shooters prefer the 22lr for its over all ease to use for the new shooter (confidence builder) The ammo was on the cheap and always available (once upon a time )

*The next is the 9mm is hardly found in revolver configuration. Revolvers are safer for the new shooter (plenty in 22lr). Where an auto is ready to go immediately again. And if for some reason your mind strays a UD can quickly occur, sometimes with catastrophic results.


So my recommendation is go with the 9mm, learn it master it, shoot it often. shoot it safely, and keep it clean.

If its going to be your CC pistol then buy some premium factory defensive ammo (Gold Dots etc.) buy a couple extra magazine (I say four is minimum)

And a Good CC holster or two..
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Old 06-28-2014, 08:29 AM   #19
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And if you want something a little Bigger, the SR9 & SR9C were also mentioned. Ruger also just released a New version the 9E( for Economy). Basically is a less expensive SR9. Can take 10 or 17 Rd. Mags like the other SR9's,..the difference being interchangeable Backstraps for the Grip, like several others on the market. My wife has smaller hands then mine, and she likes the SR. As soon as we find a Stainless or two tone,...look for the 9E in your LGS of Choice within a month. Ruger execs couldn't release the info back in January when we interviewed them @ SHOT,.. But they did let slip that. "Something was in the works" for a mid yr. release. MSRP is$429..compared to $499-$529 for the std. SR...

Edit: BYB: if you asked someone advice and they told you "Figure it out for yourself" you'd think they were just a bit rude....,
Just Saying. Some of us don't mind offering the help, that's part of what the forums are supposed to be about.
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Old 06-28-2014, 09:13 AM   #20
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I have had several people ask me how to figure out which handgun to buy if you are new to guns. They say that for a new person there are soooo many guns to choose from that it makes it difficult. The people who I talked with want something for home defense, but said they would possibly get a CCW permit in the future.

I told them to think of shooting ability, not caliber so much. I pointed out the .22lr, .22 Mag, .32 acp, and .380 acp. I know a lot of people say get bigger calibers, but I want to see the person be able to get shots on target without much problem. Plus it is nice to have quick follow up shots.

I told them to rent as many of these calibers I recommended and shoot them at a range. Once they get some confidence and feel a caliber they like, then start looking at guns in that caliber to buy.

Not that many countries have the problem of which gun to buy. The U.S. makes a very large number of guns available to shooters. Some countries limit the caliber you can own and also which manufacturers you can get.

As a gun owner we have the duty to try and make it easier for new gun owners to find a handgun for their first gun. We need to use our heads and get them going in the right direction as to a first gun. Don't try and get them to buy the .45 you like best. Get them started properly with a lesser caliber, because we all know after they shoot awhile they will want other guns.
Personally, I don't believe a mouse gun is a good idea.

I think someone should learn to shoot a 9mm with JHP's at least.
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