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-   -   A New 32 Round (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/new-32-round-55665/)

DodgeThis 01-17-2012 12:41 PM

A New 32 Round
 
Maybe I'm just a little behind time on this. But I was wondering about a round I just found out about. NAA came out with a 32naa. Essentially it's a 380 necked down to a 32. My guess is that it's superior in velocity compared to the 380. I know a lot of you won't even have a 380 much less a 32. But I was looking for more info on the 32naa. Also I have to wonder is this round going to be one of those obsolete cartridges that you can't find or do you think it'll be one to take off and become the new craze? I can't help but to think that this newer faster round will become a hot seller and be finding other manufacturers putting out pistols in 32naa. To be perfectly honest, I would like to see more of them. I believe it's a good starting point for a new era. In which brings me to another point. We all know about the 357Sig. And of course there are other bottle neck cartridges out there. But how long before some company take the idea to the extreme with something like a 45acp necked down to a 9mm, or a 40 to a 9, or a 9 down to a 32, heck maybe even a 9 down to a 25.? I can clearly see where this bottle neck feature can be a brilliant thing. I mean for the people that prefer velocity over diameter, this can create a really hot load. Yeah a 25 is tiny, but if you've got a 9mm casing pushing a little 45 gr hp, well I could foresee that little booger running out of the muzzle at 2000+ fps. A fast tearing round like so could really foo some damage. Maybe it's just me, I don't know. Please feel free to let the opinions ( and facts if you have ) fly into a discussion. I'm intrigued by this as well as overly curious.

chiliphil1 01-17-2012 12:53 PM

The 357 sig is a 9mm in a 40 case, that round is extremely potent, it is very effective with single shot take downs and has an energy almost that of the 45 acp. To answer your other questions the extreme has been done! Look on wikipedia at the 440 cor bon, it is a 50ae necked down to 44,it runs something like 1900 fps, can you imagine the damage of a 44 at that velocity!

pagj17 01-17-2012 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DodgeThis
Maybe I'm just a little behind time on this. But I was wondering about a round I just found out about. NAA came out with a 32naa. Essentially it's a 380 necked down to a 32. My guess is that it's superior in velocity compared to the 380. I know a lot of you won't even have a 380 much less a 32. But I was looking for more info on the 32naa. Also I have to wonder is this round going to be one of those obsolete cartridges that you can't find or do you think it'll be one to take off and become the new craze? I can't help but to think that this newer faster round will become a hot seller and be finding other manufacturers putting out pistols in 32naa. To be perfectly honest, I would like to see more of them. I believe it's a good starting point for a new era. In which brings me to another point. We all know about the 357Sig. And of course there are other bottle neck cartridges out there. But how long before some company take the idea to the extreme with something like a 45acp necked down to a 9mm, or a 40 to a 9, or a 9 down to a 32, heck maybe even a 9 down to a 25.? I can clearly see where this bottle neck feature can be a brilliant thing. I mean for the people that prefer velocity over diameter, this can create a really hot load. Yeah a 25 is tiny, but if you've got a 9mm casing pushing a little 45 gr hp, well I could foresee that little booger running out of the muzzle at 2000+ fps. A fast tearing round like so could really foo some damage. Maybe it's just me, I don't know. Please feel free to let the opinions ( and facts if you have ) fly into a discussion. I'm intrigued by this as well as overly curious.

Well, technically, isn't 357 sig already 40 necked down to a 9 in essence? I'll look into 32naa, it may make a nice BUG.

Snowman 01-17-2012 05:01 PM

Been there. Done that.
Try a 9x25 dillon. 10mm necked to 9mm. 2000 + fps. Works well with compensators.
Or, the baddest of them all, the .17/50bmg.
http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/...ski/images.jpg
:lol:

ninjatoth 01-17-2012 05:09 PM

I don't have any experience with bottlenecked rounds for pistols,but don't it seem like they would have much less chances of ever having a feed jam?Little bullet shoving into a much larger chamber every time.

MrWray 01-17-2012 05:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snowman
Been there. Done that.
Try a 9x25 dillon. 10mm necked to 9mm. 2000 + fps. Works well with compensators.
Or, the baddest of them all, the .17/50bmg.

:lol:

Now thats funny!

MrWray 01-17-2012 05:57 PM

I own a G31 .357sig,and its a beast..

Its like a 9mm with extreme anger issues

Rex in OTZ 01-17-2012 06:10 PM

new .22 centerfire round for 1911
 
New handgun round for the 1911 - Gun & Game - The Friendliest Gun Forum on the Internet

MrWray 01-17-2012 06:21 PM

How about a 1911 in .45 long colt?

OldManMontgomery 01-17-2012 06:37 PM

Sorry
 
The .32 NAA has been around for a couple years at least. I do not see a great future for it; here's why:

It is a .380 ACP necked down to .312 (.32) caliber. According to the North American Arms website, the round runs a 60 grain bullet '... in excess of...' 1222 f/s, giving a muzzle energy of 199 foot-pounds.

To compare, the .30 Mauser round - an older and fairly well known bottleneck .30 caliber pistol caliber - shoots an 85 grain FMJ bullet at 1450 f/s, energy of 402 foot-pounds (attributed to Cartridges of the World.) The .30 Mauser has never been recognized as a serious man-stopper by practitioners of the art in the U. S. Nor am I aware of anyone who reloads the .30 Mauser with hollow point ammunition and claims great results. (Perhaps someone does, of course; but they're being pretty discrete about it.) The .30 Mauser is known for great penetration; car doors, some forms of body armor, glass, typical residential walls and so forth.

Historical note: Colt made a run of Government Model pistols chambered for .30 Mauser. (I think these were made in the late 60s, early 70s; I'm not sure and I cannot find a reference.) They were intended for European sales and are collectable items these days. They were never considered desirable (in the wide sense of the word) for defense in the U. S.

The .38 Special 'service' load puts out a 158 grain RNL bullet at 750f/s, which gives 198 foot pounds of energy. About the same. .38 Special wadcutters show a 148 grain lead wadcutter at 700 f/s for 164 foot pounds.

According to the NAA website, the 'Guardian' pistol chambered for the .32 NAA round weighs 13.5 ounces. It is a small pistol, short and thin. This would be the main selling point, in my eyes. It can be concealed easily in a pocket. However, the muzzle blast has to be louder and more abrasive than a comparable .380 ACP or .32 ACP. Recoil is probably nominal; perhaps abrupt, but not 'heavy'. It holds seven rounds, including a chambered round.

Whether this pistol and round is a commercial success depends on how many people are convince to buy it. Usually that means the 'new' item will do something specific very well; better than anything else available, or better than what the purchaser has already in possession.

In my case, this pistol and cartridge combination is in direct competition with my old Chief's Special revolver in .38 Special. I'm not convinced to spend the money on the 'new' gun.

Obviously, I'm not the final say in the matter. I don't see much value in the .357 SIG, for example. (I've already in possession of a Government Model in Super .38.) But it is packaged in a well crafted mechanism and pretends to .357 Magnum capabilities in an auto pistol; not just an auto pistol, but a double action auto pistol.

So far, this .32 NAA hasn't set anything on fire in terms of sales and popular discussion. I don't see that changing.


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