home protection - Page 8
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > General Handgun Discussion > home protection

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-27-2013, 05:38 PM   #71
BZ3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BZ3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 68
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I use my G37 with CT laser and Streamlight

image-540418654.jpg

__________________
BZ3 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 04:49 AM   #72
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Garadex's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Kalifornia
Posts: 1,267
Liked 225 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 228

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weapon

I wouldn't carry a 1911 unless it was cocked and locked. If you carry it hammer down, you are giving up a decent part of the primary benefit of the 1911 which is speed. Otherwise, you are entirely on point - a series 80 has no safety issues with hammer down carry -- and more firearms companies than I care to name have borrowed that drop safety design.
Of course I would carry it cocked and locked but I was just saying if I needed to I could.
__________________

I'm gonna stop you right there, you just said an AR-15 is a high-powered rifle. It is obvious you don't know anything about guns and I shall ignore anything you say from this point on.

Garadex is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 08:15 PM   #73
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
locutus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 10,252
Liked 6595 Times on 3674 Posts
Likes Given: 6244

Default

I would never dream of carrying a pistol cocked and locked.

If you practice, you can rack the slide as you draw, and it's lightning fast.

If you ever saw old time military police draw a 1911, you would realize that there is no need for cocked and locked.

And hammer down on an empty chamber is the safest mode of carry.

locutus is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 08:21 PM   #74
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
locutus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 10,252
Liked 6595 Times on 3674 Posts
Likes Given: 6244

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 95sniper View Post
Or when they call magazines clips.
And you personally never, never use an incorrect term?? Really????

You never call a revolver a wheelgun?
You never call a carbine a rifle?
You never call your weapon a gun?

GIVE IT A REST!!
locutus is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 08:22 PM   #75
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bige91603's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 842
Liked 84 Times on 61 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by locutus View Post
I would never dream of carrying a pistol cocked and locked.

If you practice, you can rack the slide as you draw, and it's lightning fast.

If you ever saw old time military police draw a 1911, you would realize that there is no need for cocked and locked.

And hammer down on an empty chamber is the safest mode of carry.
That's exactly how i carry, everyone may criticize this saying i am losing precious time but like you said with practice you can rack the slide as you draw. Much safer and will prevent any accidental or negligent firing. Especially since i carry a striker fired handgun w/o external safety. No glock leg!
__________________
bige91603 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 09:00 PM   #76
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BeyondTheBox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,612
Liked 292 Times on 252 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cj84 View Post

Did anyone see the guy on walking dead grab his revolver and u heard the slide rack I couldn't take the show seriously after that.
That's the reason you can't take this show seriously? Lol

It's about ZOMBIES!!!!!!

Hahahahahahaha
__________________
BeyondTheBox is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 09:16 PM   #77
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 100
Liked 21 Times on 15 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by locutus
I would never dream of carrying a pistol cocked and locked.

If you practice, you can rack the slide as you draw, and it's lightning fast.

If you ever saw old time military police draw a 1911, you would realize that there is no need for cocked and locked.

And hammer down on an empty chamber is the safest mode of carry.
Hammer down on an empty chamber is the safest? Yes -- until you need it and then it is also slower. It doesn't matter how much you practice drawing and racking the slide, you are still adding a much longer step to the process than drawing, acquiring the target, thumbing off the safety and firing. Anyone who is well practiced in condition one carry will have at least one round in you before you complete your draw, rack/raise, sight acquire and fire.

If he were still alive, I suppose you could argue your point with Jeff Cooper (aka the father of the Modern Technique of handgun shooting, and one of the 20th century's foremost experts on pistol craft).

"Condition Three: Chamber empty, full magazine in place, hammer down.
Condition Two: A round chambered, full magazine in place, hammer down.
Condition One: A round chambered, full magazine in place, hammer cocked, safety on.
Condition Zero: A round chambered, full magazine in place, hammer cocked, safety off.
Some of these configurations are safer than others (for instance, a single action pistol without a firing pin safety such as a transfer bar system should never be carried in Condition 2), while others are quicker to fire the gun (Condition 1)." - Jeff Cooper

Your proposed method also only works if you have both hands free and can get a solid grip on the slide. How are you going to draw and rack the slide if one hand is restrained, wounded or otherwise disabled? What if your hands are wet and the slide slips in mid rack or you just short stroke the slide under the stress of an attack (stress can severely short-circuit fine motor control after all)? (Look up U.S. Marines condition black for reference). Condition one requires fewer movements and muscle actions to screw up...did I mention it's faster?

Before you claim your method is "lightning fast" you may want to try running all the variations of the Tueller Drill. That set of drills will teach you exactly how fast you're not.

"How many times have you seen a movie actor with his 1911 entering a room hammer down? They don’t work that way, my boy." Wiley Clapp
__________________
weapon is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 09:59 PM   #78
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,842
Liked 1230 Times on 686 Posts
Likes Given: 530

Default

Between the SIG/HK, 1911, and Glock/M&P choices, I would take the Glock or M&P.

Anyone who thinks a mechanical device provides safety is delusional. I've pesonally activated/deactivated the safety on a Colt M1911-A1 while holsterin/unholstering or simply seated in a vehicle enough times to know that the "safety" lever is quaint but not a replacement for safe firearms handling. The notion that a properly designed and functioning firearm is "safe" or "unsafe" is entirely fictional. If you can't throw it in a bucket, it isn't real. You can't throw safety in a bucket and, therefore, it isn't real. Practice proper gun handling and use proper equipment. Any holster that doesn't completely cover the trigger mechanism isn't proper equipment. Anyone who relies on a mechanical device to prevent negligent discharges isn't practicing proper gun handling. If your sights aren't on target or you don't intend to fire, don't pull the trigger. Pretty simple.

I don't like having more operating controls than are absolutely necessary on something I have to pick up and use in the dead of night while half asleep. A semi-automatic pistol requires a magazine release. A slide lock feature is nice to have and pretty standard, but not necessary. A thumb safety or grip safety is extra equipment and not necessary. An external hammer is extra equipment and not necessary.

I've never had a Colt 1911 go 5,000 rounds before a major parts failure of some kind. I'm not about to spend $3,000 on a 1911 that's reliable and properly manufactured when I can buy a $500-$600 polymer frame pistol that is reliable. All mechanical devices require maintenance and all will eventually fail, but having an extractor on a brand new gun fail in fewer than 500 rounds is not what I'd call stellar reliability. Sure, I replaced it myself and moved on, but I'm not betting my life on that pistol.

The SIG and HK pistols are excellent weapons and I put quite a few rounds through my USP 45 before I sold it, but the SIG and HK pistols cost more than the Glock or M&P and do the same thing. Both pistols have more expensive magazine and replacement parts, in general. The Glock and M&P generally have less expensive magazines and replacement parts along with a variety of holsters for virtually any type of carry method that pleases you. The cost difference isn't huge and if you shoot enough it won't matter, but I like spending my money on ammo.

All the discussion about how "safe" this or that condition of readiness to fire is seems to fail to come to terms with the concept that a firearm is designed to kill and requires that the user not inadvertently pull the trigger if he or she does not intend to fire and kill or destroy whatever is in the path of the bullet. Don't point the firearm at yourself or anyone else you're not willing to kill. Don't pull the trigger if you don't intend to fire (and don't allow anyone or anything else to pull the trigger unless you intend to fire).

Train with your weapon. Respect what it is (a purposefully lethal mechanical device) and come to terms with what it is not (a thinking tool designed to counteract any irresponsible behavior on your part).

__________________
kbd512 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 10:12 PM   #79
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,842
Liked 1230 Times on 686 Posts
Likes Given: 530

Default

Any firearm that is not loaded and ready to fire is a poorly designed, way-overpriced club.

You can go outside, pick up a reasonably straight stick, and be the proud new owner of a well designed and reasonably priced club.

I won't pay a dime for a dull knife and I certainly won't pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for a club.

__________________
kbd512 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 11:32 PM   #80
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
locutus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 10,252
Liked 6595 Times on 3674 Posts
Likes Given: 6244

Default

Weapon, I am not a disciple of that old 19th century duphus Jeffie Cooper.

I can draw my SIG 226 or my Beretta 92 and fire as fast as you can with your grand daddy's world war one pistol.

I carried a 1911 for a while in military service. I was not impressed with it, but I did learn how to use.

As for Jeffie's "wild west quick draw hype" law enforcement experience doesn't bear out the need for it.

That is the stuff of Jeffie's shooting games, not the real world.

If you don't allow your head to become lodged in your arse, you will not be involved in a Wild West quick draw situation.

__________________

War is the continuation of politics by other means.
Carl von Clausewitz
V
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.
Winston Churchill

locutus is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Home Protection Gun guthy125 Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 30 01-17-2013 04:24 AM
Home Protection with AR greenr19 Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 1 04-05-2010 02:50 AM
.38 or .357 ammo, home protection BacktoGats Revolver Handguns 40 11-30-2009 12:08 AM
Home Protection Shotgun mariam General Shotgun Discussion 161 09-29-2009 10:10 PM
advice on home protection bellx1 The Club House 10 05-04-2008 04:44 PM



Newest Threads