Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > General Handgun Discussion > home protection

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-25-2013, 07:21 PM   #41
Supporting Member
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
drvsafe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,633
Liked 210 Times on 168 Posts
Likes Given: 116

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cj84
Glock are just plain badass.
You got it right you just didn't out a comma; flocks are just bad, ass. See?

Kidding. I do t prefer them myself but they are a very good firearm. If you ask why I dot prefer them I would share my opinion, but there's already been enough bashing on this thread I don't think it would be productive.
__________________
SIG 1911 .45 ACP
SIG P229R 9mm
Beretta BU9 Nano 9mm
Beretta 84FS .380 ACP
Ruger MKIII 22/45 Target .22LR

PWS (Primary Weapons Systems) MK114 5.56
drvsafe is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 07:35 PM   #42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BeyondTheBox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,479
Liked 257 Times on 227 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drvsafe View Post
... I would share my opinion, but there's already been enough bashing on this thread I don't think it would be productive.
See, that's where I disagree with most. I think every opinion should be stated, negative or positive. Just as long as they are specific they can be informative and constructive. You may or may not like something for a reason that I and others have yet to discover or think about.
__________________
BeyondTheBox is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 08:05 PM   #43
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
SSGN_Doc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 3,789
Liked 1695 Times on 1031 Posts
Likes Given: 356

Default

I happen to like Glocks. I also happen to like 1911s as well. You can add Sig and Beretta in there as well and Ruger too. I think if someone sticks to a quality gun, buys quality ammo, trains with it and the combination proves to be reliable and accurate for the shooter, then they can find a holster and carry method that should prove safe, efficient, and effective for them.

We can argue about what is best, but based on our own experience we may have each found our own "best" firearm.

If someone buys a Glock and trains with it an carries it in a good holster and is truly familiar with how it works then they should be able to carry and operate it safely. Same with a 1911.

I once read of someone who preferred to carry a 1911 with a round in the chamber and the hammer on half cock. I'm not sure how they came to a conclusion that routinely chambering a round and lowering the hammer to the half cock position was a good idea. But they had reached that conclusion until they had the hammer slip from under their thumb.

So there are people who can have a great platform and a lack if understanding in how to safely carry it.

__________________
SSGN_Doc is offline  
axxe55 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 08:39 PM   #44
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FrontierTCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 566
Liked 203 Times on 132 Posts

Default

Not going to get into the Glock vs 1911 debate because I am a fan of both. Just wanted to share a couple of stories from when a local P.D. switched from S&W 9mm's with manual safeties back in early 90's.

One Officer was on the scene of a fire when a fireman asked to see the new Glock. The officer showing off the new gun accidentally discharged a round that struck the rear bumper of a fire truck.

Another officer accidentally shot his couch while attempting to tie his shoe (evidently holding the gun in one hand for some reason).

Almost all A. D.'s are do to improper training, not being familiar with the weapon, or simple carelessness.

__________________
FrontierTCB is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 03:03 AM   #45
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 100
Liked 20 Times on 15 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by potentialglock

2.5 lbs??? U realize that's a flinch in my trigger finger?? Most DA pistols have five to six pound trigger pull
Note: that was +2.5 lbs. My 1911s are set at 4.0lbs -- my trigger gauge shows my box stock Glock as 6.5lbs even though they are marked as 5.5lbs models. I definitely prefer the 1911 trigger and safety mechanism to that of the Glock (sproing!...that is what comes to mind when I think about Glock triggers). On the other hand, the Glocks are really durable. When they first came out, I used to toss mine in my swimming pool and let it sit there for half the night before diving in to retrieve it -- it was a good way to prove the benefits of Tenifer to nay-sayers at the time as that was still in the day when most didn't know what in the Hell a Glock was...lol - times have changed.

Speaking of which, a friend recently attended a Glock Armor course and he advised that Tenifer is being phased out. I haven't bothered to look that up yet as I haven't been in the market for a new Glock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc
I once read of someone who preferred to carry a 1911 with a round in the chamber and the hammer on half cock. I'm not sure how they came to a conclusion that routinely chambering a round and lowering the hammer to the half cock position was a good idea. But they had reached that conclusion until they had the hammer slip from under their thumb.
Carrying a 1911 like that is just dangerous. They were designed to be carried cocked and locked - I have carried one cocked and locked for 25+ years and I've never had an AD with one.

I have seen a few ADs with Glocks - most recently an undercover officer who was carrying it in a fairly decent holster and upon inserting the Glock into the holster got a bit of material from his shirt caught between the gun and the holster which apparently snagged the trigger and "bang" -- amazingly enough, he wasn't injured.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRau

If you want to deny reality so be it ( you are the prime example of the indoctrination I referred to). Just 50+ years of experience here, and you??? But there are three LEO's whom I know personally who shot themselves with Glocks while carrying off duty w/o a proper holster.
Actually JimRau - I semi-misread your post the first time around - that's what I get for reading forums on a stinkin' iPhone at the end of a very long day. As such, I slightly misinterpreted your comparison of the Glock trigger to the cocked and unlocked 1911 trigger - however, I still do not entirely agree with it. A well tuned 1911 takes very little movement for the hammer to drop and the pull weight is significantly less than any Glock trigger I have tried including the ones that claim to be 3.5lbs - to me, they feel like a 4.5-4.75lbs 1911 trigger at best. The take up also makes quite a bit of difference -- my Glock 21 has about 5mm of slack before I hit the increased tension point where I know the striker will go if I move just a bit further back. On my 1911s, it is considerably less take up - not even half as much even on my series 80 (custom trigger, slightly advanced timing) and even less on my 70 series 1911s. All of my 1911s have triggers that break like the proverbial glass rod or something extremely close to it -- there is nothing of that nature in the world of box-stock Glock triggers or even tuned Glock triggers. That is likely why when you see reviews of the best Glock aftermarket triggers or trigger jobs they always have to try to draw some comparison as to how it feels relative to a custom 1911 trigger...usually that comparison results in the heavy use of the word "almost"...which is a euphemism for "not as good as a damn 1911 trigger"

On the other hand, I understand what you are trying to get at - carrying a Glock with a round in chamber with no holster is a dangerous idea. If you do not use the right holster or if you are careless with a Glock you can run into trouble quickly as there are no affirmative safeties. While much of that can be resolved with proper training, it still allows for the possibility of bizarre accidents (like getting your shirt caught in between the holster and Glock). Putting a lever on the trigger and calling it a safety doesn't count in my book. Especially if you compare it to the safety mechanisms on a 1911 - the thumb safety alone makes a 1911 inherently more safe than a Glock as even if the 1911 is carried cocked and locked, the firing mechanism is completely locked up by a block of steel...even more so if you consider the grip safety and yet again if you are talking about a series 80.

Lastly, I know several people who can claim "50 years experience" with firearms as though it means they know what they are doing. That is a logical fallacy and proves nothing. For example, one of the gentlemen I know who has over 50 years experience with firearms has the longest history of accidental discharges on the planet -- if he gets a few more under his belt, I am turning him into Guinness as it will be completely worthy of a world record. Another who could make the same claim is much more cautious and is actually a fairly decent shooter but he has zero knowledge of how to properly clean and maintain his toys. Neither can claim to know how barrel twist effects bullet selection, how to properly modify sear geometry and hammer hooks, how detail strip over 100 weapons, how to account for Coriolis effect (or temperature, humidity, wind drift and actual horizontal distance) on shots over 1,500m or that they ever managed a sub-one second draw and double tap on 2 targets at 15m with nothing but a-zone hits with a 1911...I may have packed a little more in my measly 35+ years of shooting and modding than most. Coming soon: 2,500m extreme long distance rifles...I can hardly wait for this one.
__________________

Last edited by weapon; 01-26-2013 at 04:55 AM.
weapon is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 03:30 AM   #46
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BeyondTheBox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,479
Liked 257 Times on 227 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc View Post
I once read of someone who preferred to carry a 1911 with a round in the chamber and the hammer on half cock. I'm not sure how they came to a conclusion that routinely chambering a round and lowering the hammer to the half cock position was a good idea. But they had reached that conclusion until they had the hammer slip from under their thumb.

So there are people who can have a great platform and a lack if understanding in how to safely carry it.
I prefer 1911 guns uncocked. If the hammer slips it does so to half cocked. No harm no foul. Plus there's a firing pin block so I don't see how anything could happen regardless.

I think these scenarios are typically extremely exaggerated and second hand "telephone effect" jobs.
__________________

Last edited by BeyondTheBox; 01-26-2013 at 03:33 AM.
BeyondTheBox is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 06:26 AM   #47
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Garadex's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Kalifornia
Posts: 1,267
Liked 225 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 228

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeyondTheBox

I prefer 1911 guns uncocked. If the hammer slips it does so to half cocked. No harm no foul. Plus there's a firing pin block so I don't see how anything could happen regardless.

I think these scenarios are typically extremely exaggerated and second hand "telephone effect" jobs.
Most people either don't know the difference between a series 80 and 70 or are referring to a series 70 when they say "a 1911 should never be carried with the hammer down". I wouldn't carry a series 70 with the hammer down however a series 80 is different with the inclusion of a firing pin block.
__________________

I'm gonna stop you right there, you just said an AR-15 is a high-powered rifle. It is obvious you don't know anything about guns and I shall ignore anything you say from this point on.

Garadex is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 06:41 AM   #48
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 100
Liked 20 Times on 15 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garadex

Most people either don't know the difference between a series 80 and 70 or are referring to a series 70 when they say "a 1911 should never be carried with the hammer down". I wouldn't carry a series 70 with the hammer down however a series 80 is different with the inclusion of a firing pin block.
I wouldn't carry a 1911 unless it was cocked and locked. If you carry it hammer down, you are giving up a decent part of the primary benefit of the 1911 which is speed. Otherwise, you are entirely on point - a series 80 has no safety issues with hammer down carry -- and more firearms companies than I care to name have borrowed that drop safety design.
__________________
weapon is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 09:08 AM   #49
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 3,700
Liked 1009 Times on 701 Posts
Likes Given: 346

Default

I think all the weapons you selected are inadequate for home defense. If you are the victim of a home invasion or have to defend your self outdoors and the bad guy has a long gun you had better be right with the lord or whatever you believe in. The odds are very good you will meet your maker.

__________________
John_Deer is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 10:58 AM   #50
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Donn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 856
Liked 309 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

M&P 9mm because that's what I have.
__________________
Never argue with an idiot in public. People passing by won't know which one of you is the idiot.
Donn is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Home Protection Gun guthy125 Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 30 01-17-2013 03:24 AM
Home Protection with AR greenr19 Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 1 04-05-2010 01:50 AM
.38 or .357 ammo, home protection BacktoGats Revolver Handguns 40 11-29-2009 11:08 PM
Home Protection Shotgun mariam General Shotgun Discussion 161 09-29-2009 09:10 PM
advice on home protection bellx1 The Club House 10 05-04-2008 03:44 PM