Help with First Handgun
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > General Handgun Discussion > Help with First Handgun

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-06-2011, 11:35 PM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
6shootersandw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 80
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default Help with First Handgun

I am finally going to purchase my first handgun. I like S&W and would like to get a M&P 40 or 45ACP. I have had a couple of people telling me to start off with a .22 but I really want one of these guns. Any opinions would be very helpful.

__________________
6shootersandw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 09-07-2011, 12:40 AM   #2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9206 Times on 5058 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

I like revolvers myself. get anything you want, if you start with a .22 your just gonna want something bigger in about 6 weeks if not much earlier. Mine is a s&w model 65 in .357 mag and I love it. My MOM who is in later middle age at 54 years old and is not a large woman at 5'9" and 120 pounds, can handle my gun just fine, and is in fact more accurate with it than I am. She has a .22 rough rider, a Jiminez Arms .22 automatic, and a S&W M&P .40. she also has a rossi .44 mag lever action, mossberg 500 20 gauge, and is thinking about picking up a S&W model 29 in .44 mag. She has no problem with any of her guns. Unless you just can't handle anything at all, just skip the .22, M&P's are great, in fact I'm thinking my next one is gonna be a M&P .45.

__________________
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 12:54 AM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
6shootersandw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 80
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trip286 View Post
I like revolvers myself. get anything you want, if you start with a .22 your just gonna want something bigger in about 6 weeks if not much earlier. Mine is a s&w model 65 in .357 mag and I love it. My MOM who is in later middle age at 54 years old and is not a large woman at 5'9" and 120 pounds, can handle my gun just fine, and is in fact more accurate with it than I am. She has a .22 rough rider, a Jiminez Arms .22 automatic, and a S&W M&P .40. she also has a rossi .44 mag lever action, mossberg 500 20 gauge, and is thinking about picking up a S&W model 29 in .44 mag. She has no problem with any of her guns. Unless you just can't handle anything at all, just skip the .22, M&P's are great, in fact I'm thinking my next one is gonna be a M&P .45.
Thanks for the info I can't wait to get it. I am probably going to go with the .45 and then my next gun will be a S&W .44 revolver. Your lucky to have a mother that's into guns.
__________________
6shootersandw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 02:16 AM   #4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cincinnati,Ohio
Posts: 376
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

You can always rent what you like before you make your investment but you sound like you already got your mind made up.

__________________
Glockpotion23 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 04:02 AM   #5
FAA licensed bugsmasher
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ScottA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Davenport,IA
Posts: 6,990
Liked 2337 Times on 1258 Posts
Likes Given: 844

Default

If you like the .40 or .45, then go ahead and get one. My first handgun was a S&W 411 .40 caliber. But take this to heart...

Everyone needs a .22. That is probably the only rule most of us on this forum can agree upon. They are cheap to feed, meaning much more shooting, and a load of fun. I can pretty well guarantee you that your 2nd or at the very least 3rd gun will be a .22. Every time I go to the range, I'll mix and match which guns I take, but I'll always take one of my .22's.

__________________

Scott

Quote:
If you're not representing Jesus in a way that makes people want to hang out with you, you're doing it wrong.
Quote:
Those who refuse to participate in politics shall be governed by their inferiors. -Plato
Join the NRA
ScottA is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 04:46 AM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Incline Village,NV
Posts: 156
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 6shootersandw View Post
I am finally going to purchase my first handgun. I like S&W and would like to get a M&P 40 or 45ACP. I have had a couple of people telling me to start off with a .22 but I really want one of these guns. Any opinions would be very helpful.
.45 acp is my favorite caliber and I have several 1911s and revolvers chambered in it. It's hard to go wrong with that. But, I also have a S&W M&P 40 that lives by my bed -- it's also a great caliber in a great platform.
__________________
mes227 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 10:08 AM   #7
Retired
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
danf_fl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: LA (Lower Alabama),FL
Posts: 10,588
Liked 3114 Times on 1789 Posts
Likes Given: 1326

Default

a .357 revolver with a 4" barrel. You can shoot .38 Specials through it. You will learn that each shot has to count on target. It will force you to take a break to reload.
Maintenance is not that hard.

A semi-auto is a good firearm AFTER you have the basics of shooting down. Most Noob's will buy the latest and greatest. Fill the mag to hold 20 rounds, spray and pray at the target, then wonder why they cannot score a bull's-eye.

__________________

Amendment II:
"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

Life Member NRA
Life Member NAHC
Former President of the ECPT (Eifel Combat Pistol Team)

danf_fl is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 10:49 AM   #8
Jay
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Jay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Near Marion, IN
Posts: 736
Liked 18 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

My usual response....

This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there.

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....

__________________

NRA Life Member ... Marine Corps League Life Member
Freedom has a flavor the protected can never taste...
USMC 8652, 2531, RVN Jun '67, - May 69

Some of my toys

Jay is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 01:08 PM   #9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
paulbrower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Dardenne Prairie,Missouri
Posts: 117
Liked 10 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
My usual response....

This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there.

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....
I agree 100% with Jay. Just remember, if you don't shoot often (or have never been shooting), it will take a while to build muscle-memory, and to get your 'shooting muscles' in shape. First time I shot my Glock 17 (9mm) my hands were shaking after 100 rounds and I thought the gun was too big for me. But, I kept at it, and I don't hesitate to put 500 rounds through it in a single range visit these days. When I shoot the Glock 17 now, I barely notice it. Bought a Glock 27 (.40) a couple of weeks ago, and to some extent, I'm going through the same exercise ... was a little tough first time I shot it, but it feels good now.
__________________
paulbrower is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2011, 04:31 PM   #10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9206 Times on 5058 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

I do most definitely agree with keeping a good .22 around, just not as a first gun that is intended to serve as self defense. yes, the second or third firearms purchase should probably be a .22. personally if I could do it over again, my first purchase would be a shotty for home defense, apply for the ccw, get a handgun, and then a .22 of some type, maybe the umarex mp5 replica in .22, just because it's so damn cool. Instead, I got my model 65, carried illegally for quite a while (not to stick it to the man, but because I feel it's my right, and in my neck of the woods you just don't get hassled for it) and then I got a mosin nagant for the heck of it, because it's cheap and cool. My .22 is out of commission with a broken hammer sear and I just don't care enough about it to fix it right now, it only cost me 75 bucks.

__________________
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Looking to buy my first handgun JackofTrades Semi-Auto Handguns 39 03-15-2012 12:51 PM
New 9mm Handgun JiroZero713 General Handgun Discussion 17 02-15-2012 08:14 PM
Looking for a handgun SmithKid308 General Handgun Discussion 11 07-24-2011 02:31 PM
1st Handgun flyingbrickracing Semi-Auto Handguns 5 01-04-2010 09:45 PM
First Handgun?? bhiowa General Handgun Discussion 4 12-11-2008 03:39 AM