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Old 12-10-2010, 05:02 AM   #21
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... Isn't like a .45 can carry more ammo than a revolver? Well, if I ever would to use the gun, I think 6 rounds should be enough? ...


Last i heard, judges frown on more than 5 bullet holes in a self defense related shooting.
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Old 12-10-2010, 01:27 PM   #22
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Thank you Logan & WDB, I will hit the range this weekend and try few guns. Will also take a "first step" class before I buying anything, thank you for the help guys.

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Old 12-10-2010, 04:43 PM   #23
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Hey guys, I have just joined the forum and started to get into guns & home safty.

Due to recent events, I need to arm myself. What would you guys recommend as my first handgun? I have looked at Berretta, and Glock but dont really know the difference. Our gun story salesman are no help, and can't really answer any of my question.

1. Is .45 enough to "stop" someone, not necessary kill him/her just stop him.
2. Since I dont have any prior experience with guns, is there any good books I can read?
3. What about home safety training class or any other tactical classes? Are there any in Maryland? Or how do I found out if there are any offered?
4. Should I buy a .22 first for target practice? Since the ammo is much cheaper than .45? And I am sure I will probably use lots of ammo, right?

Thank you guys
I may ramble a bit. Forgive me if I cover something someone else already has.

1. The key to stopping someone, especially with a pistol round, is shot placement. What you are really trying to stop is the threat. In most states, once the threat has been stopped, you are supposed to stop shooting. If you fire a round and miss, but the bad guy (BG) drops his gun and runs away with his hands held high and empty above his head, you aren't supposed to shoot him. But if you put a couple of rounds in a BG and he drops to the ground but is continuing to point his gun at you, he's still a threat. Stop the threat.

2. I recommend The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery by Massad Ayoob. There's a lot of good general information there. You shouldn't stop reading there, but it's a good place to start.

3. It sounds like you are off to a good start with a "First Steps" class. Whoever teaches that class will probably be able to point you toward other training. In an earlier reply, someone mentioned giving a lot of thought to what you want the gun for. Many concealed carry classes can help you do this, by discussing scenarios and the pros/cons of guns and gear. You might find that you'll get some new ideas and readjust some priorities.

4. I don't know what your budget is like. If you can afford a quality defense gun and a .22, then yes, it's a great idea. A .22 is a great platform for both learning and practice. I've been shooting most of my life, and I still take a .22 with me almost every time I visit the range. They're a lot of fun, and you can practice everything with a .22 except recoil control. If you can buy both at one time, I recommend waiting on the .22 until you choose your defense gun. You may want to get a .22 that's as similar to your defense gun as possible. Since it seems like you're wanting to train up on your defensive gun in short order, it will help to practice on the same platform. For example, if you choose a revolver for your defense gun, you might want a .22 revolver. Depending on your defense gun choice, there may be a dependable conversion kit that will allow you to fire .22 rounds using your defense gun's frame (and trigger!) which gives you a consistent feel and trigger pull. Do your research on that, though!

You mentioned in a later post that you should probably get something that your wife is also comfortable with. If you have the budget, and if it's something she's interested in, I suggest letting your wife pick out a gun for herself.

There are threads here devoted to wives and guns. There are also threads devoted to .22s and .22 conversion kits. Search around and do your reading. If you have a specific question, ask away. I'm sure we could all offer more than we already have, but we would go on more than I already have.

You mentioned that you are arming yourself due to some circumstances. That's going to have a lot to do with your initial selections, and with how quickly you get some training. If you want to elaborate, we may have more advice for you.

Research the laws of your state and, if necessary, the laws of your community. Once you have done that, see how they apply to your life/lifestyle. Then figure out where one or more guns fit into that lifestyle. That will also help you decide what gun is right for you. Then start making plans for how to defend your home and yourselves.

OK, I'll stop now.
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Old 12-10-2010, 07:29 PM   #24
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This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there.

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

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Old 12-10-2010, 07:51 PM   #25
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Lee, I am very new to guns, too. As several have suggested here my first gun is a Ruger GP100, which is a .357 magnum revolver but it's kind of large. It has a 6" barrel so it is not very conducive to carrying but my friend recommended this gun because it has less recoil and better stability and accuracy when shooting with that long barrel. I don't carry and originally I bought my gun to target shoot yet it would make an excellent self defense weapon but as others have said, it's become a little addictive and now I want a .22 revolver or pistol of some sort for cheap shooting. The person who got me interested in guns does not take safety lightly and told me not to get any ammo for my gun until I got a Gun Vault lock box and my gun is always in a locked box. I have a 4 year old granddaughter that spends a lot of time at my house and even the best behaved child will do things you tell them not to do and the one in a million accident could end up ruining your life. Just my opinion.

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Old 12-10-2010, 08:27 PM   #26
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I meant no offence with my frankness but I, like all our members, take firearm stewardship very seriously.

This is one of the finest, concealable 357 revolvers that would fit your first gun needs and a great hand-me-down for your SO in the near future.

Attachment 22603

Ruger LCR-357 ^
Ouch. There aren't too many times I'd argue with you... but man, an LCR 357 for a first gun? I'd be far too concerned that a newbie would put 1 magnum round through that and never come back.

Nothing wrong with a .357 at all. It is the most versatile caliber out there today. But magnum rounds through a very light gun can be shocking at best. I'd much rather see a new shooter look towards an SP101 or GP100 in .357 rather than the LCR.

Of course, just go follow Jay's advice and try everything you can. If you get a chance to fire a magnum round through a range's LCR, you'll quickly learn if it's an option you want to take.
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Old 12-10-2010, 08:29 PM   #27
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I may ramble a bit. Forgive me if I cover something someone else already has.


You mentioned that you are arming yourself due to some circumstances. That's going to have a lot to do with your initial selections, and with how quickly you get some training. If you want to elaborate, we may have more advice for you.


OK, I'll stop now.
Well, I live in a safe county but in the recently few months. There are lots of crimes, and mostly are robberies. Few days ago, one of my neighbor's daughters got kidnapped and got me really scared. I have shot few rounds with friends before, but got zero knowledge on owning one.
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Old 12-10-2010, 09:35 PM   #28
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This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that.....
Everyone has to choose for themselves but if you have never bought a pair of shoes before it's nice to hear from people who have so that you can make a more informed decision. I wouldn't want to wear a pair of wingtips to my first day on a construction job simply because I didn't know that I should have bought a pair of boots. While the gun stores might provide great info, they also are trying to make a sale and make money, the advice he finds here is usually going to be less biased.

/Just don't say you want a Glock
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Old 12-11-2010, 10:48 PM   #29
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OMG. Ruger LCR .357 really got a kick it to, my wife put that down after 3 shots. haha!!! I was probably shooting a target 10-15 yards away, and made it on the target 14/50 tries. I must suck!!!

Then, we switched to a 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P. My wife and I were doing much better, well at least we got more rounds on the target.

What other guns do you guys think we should try out before deciding? Thanks

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Old 12-12-2010, 03:06 AM   #30
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OMG. Ruger LCR .357 really got a kick it to, my wife put that down after 3 shots. haha!!! I was probably shooting a target 10-15 yards away, and made it on the target 14/50 tries. I must suck!!!

Then, we switched to a 9mm Smith & Wesson M&P. My wife and I were doing much better, well at least we got more rounds on the target.

What other guns do you guys think we should try out before deciding? Thanks
The revolver has nothing to absorb any of the recoil. It can kick like a mule.

I like Springfield XDm's. I suggest you try one.
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