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-   -   First-time gun buyer!! (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/first-time-gun-buyer-33050/)

whitney6484 10-14-2010 09:24 PM

First-time gun buyer!!
 
Hello. I bought my first gun today. I am a single mom and have wanted a handgun for a loooong time. I randomly went into the shop today and walked out with an SCCY 9mm. I am pretty excited(: I am going to keep it unloaded until I get the hang of it and practice many hours of target shooting.

I paid $275 for the gun. I bought it for self-protection. After reading some reviews about this brand, many people are unsatisfied with specs, namely the safety sticking.

I am thinking about dishing out a few hundred more dollars for a better brand. Can you guys please give me some insight on whether you think this is necessary and what a good gun would be for me, in the $500-$600 range...

Thank you!

ETA:
My co-worker thinks I should have gotten a shot-gun because the noise alone would scare away an intruder. What about a .22 caliber??? I went with a 9mm because it is small enough to keep locked up in a nearby safe. Advice, please on the best TYPE of gun for my situation. I would love to exchange it if need-be.

orangello 10-14-2010 09:34 PM

I am not familiar with that model. I would advise some professional training on its use for self defense. I do keep a shotgun for home defense, but they are not very portable which may be an issue if you want to have a firearm anywhere but your home. A shotgun similar to mine could be purchased for less than $300; look up a Mossberg 500, specifically the models with shorter barrels (18.5" or 20").

Don't forget to secure the firearm from your child and to educate them about the dangers of unsupervised use of the firearm.


edit* found a PINK mossberg http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/336/products_id/53804 if you need style.

dunerunner 10-14-2010 09:36 PM

Your co-worker is very wise. A shotty doesn't take as much practice, it is a point and shoot defensive weapon.

A pistol, on the other hand is a tool which has to have function as well as comfort. It should feel like an extension of your body and it's use should become nearly automatic, if you intend to use it for self defense.

I wouldn't go with a caliber lower than 9mm, I would shop for a weapon that fits my hand and has a safety that is easy to operate and accessible. I would become proficient with it to the extent that I could manipulate the weapon in complete darkness.

Do some shopping and shooting, the choice is a personal decision. I'm 6' over 180# so my choice or personal preference might be different than yours.

Welcome to the FTF!!

NGIB 10-14-2010 10:12 PM

I really, truly hope you will better luck with a SCCY than the 4-5 other folks I know that bought them. Each of them got rid of theirs due to frequent malfunctions. I'd buy a S&W Sigma 10 times over as a good basic home defense gun...

Alchemist 10-14-2010 10:22 PM

With the SCCY, apparently, a lot depends on the size of your hands. The safety DOES tend to kick on (when firing) way too easily for people with big hands. But some people with small hands don't have the problem. SCCY is well aware of the issue and if you contact them they will send you a safety disable kit for $20. A lot of people have also had success by taking the safety off and filing/sanding it way down til' it's just a small nub. SCCY has just come out with a safety-less version (the CPX-2) in the past couple of months. (Too bad you didn't get one of those.)

People with big hands also tend to have a problem inadvertantly hitting the magazine release button when firing. This is an easier fix. Sanding the button WAY down with heavy grit sandpaper solves it. I like puttering with guns and didn't mind making these alterations. I don't know how handy you are with tools but, hmmmm, it's a lot to ask of a first-time gun owner! (Maybe you know someone that can do these relatively easy fixes.) And Hey, it's POSSIBLE you won't have these two often-cited problems. That'd be great. Thing is, the SCCY has decent internals and is a pretty nice-looking accurate gun once the above-described issues are taken care of. I like mine now that it's been fixed. You might as well try it out at a range with the help and advice of someone more experienced and knowledgeable. It might work out.

If not, I wouldn't recommend a shotgun for you... just too much crazy-power if you haven't been around guns much. Sounds like a respectable handgun course would be a good idea for you so you can get more familiar with everything.

utf59 10-15-2010 09:34 PM

whitney,

I'd advise you to stop by The Cornered Cat. You'll find a lot of insight about guns from a woman's point of view, and you might find answers to many of your questions.

As always, handle (and shoot!) as many guns as you can. Then buy the one that fits you best and that you are proficient with.

FreedomFighter69 10-19-2010 12:17 AM

The shotgun idea is good, but if you rather have a handgun there are a few options,,, A revolver chambered in 38 special with a 4 or 6 inch barrel is a good home defense weapon. They are easy to shoot and very accurate, and can be had for around $450.00. Make sure to use hollow point +p ammo so you get the best potency. P='s out of a 38 Special do not kick hard out of a service sized gun. The 9mm is also good, it kicks slightly harder but nothing to be worried about. I would say go to a local range, rent a 40 S&W semi-auto, and see if you can handle it well, if so the 40 would be an excellent choice. The only 22LR I'd recommend would be a Ruger 10/22 with a 30-40 round after-market Magazine attached. With that many shots and virtually no recoil you can do a lot of damage especially to the neck and face area. I doubt anyone would keep coming at you after being hit 10+ times with CCI Stingers in the face, neck, chest, groin, ect. This is a last resort however as in the case that you only have a 22 rifle ! Bigger bullets= Bigger Holes and Cavities ! You may want to try a 45 ACP at the range, it is big but that doesn't mean the kick is overbearing. In fact, the 45 ACP in my opinion is easier to handle than the 40 S&W. You have a 180-230 grain bullet moving at 770 to 980 feet per second. This is at non- +P pressures. A 40 is 980 to 1250 FPS depending on the brand you use. Generally anything from a 38 caliber on up at high velocity will have more kick, AKA 357 Magnum, 41 Mag, 44 Mag, 454 Casull ect. You have to try a few and see what the biggest caliber is that you can shoot both fast and accurate ! A good place to start though is with either a 38 Special, 44 Special, 9mm, or 45 ACP. All of these are easy to shoot especially the 38 and 44 Special, they are the easiest of the bunch ! You could also go with a 327 Federal Magnum or the FN 5.57. These are both smaller bullets driven at ultra high speed velocities especially the FN 5.57!! These too will deliver a lot of hydrostatic shock because of how fast and hard they hit ! Like I said, there is a ton of options to choose from. I hope this gives you more than a general idea and I hope to hear in the future that you have about a half-dozen guns!
Happy Shooting !!!:)

hideit 10-19-2010 12:40 AM

your coworker is a sexist pig
a shotgun !? when you wanted a handgun for such a long time......
you shouldn't listen to such garbage?
and a 22 for self defense!!!!! - this person is not a friend

yea - a 9mm is best and lots and lots of female law enforcement officers qualify with them
for that price range the sig 226 is out of the question but the striker fired pistols should be in your range - that is: glock model 19, or springfield XD or S&W M&P those would be the three that i would recommend you first go handle to see how they fit your hand

as for the shop you bought the SCCY - don't go back there - this incident has so many typical sterotypes tied to it that - without knowing the facts - they didn't respect the woman that came in the door

mongoose90 10-19-2010 01:39 PM

I think you should buy what YOU want and what FEELS GOOD in your hand. If it doesn't feel right then don't buy it. I think you made a good choice. Congrats on your first gun. :)

Shade 10-19-2010 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FreedomFighter69 (Post 370312)
1) A revolver chambered in 38 special with a 4 or 6 inch barrel is a good home defense weapon. They are easy to shoot and very accurate, and can be had for around $450.00. Make sure to use hollow point +p ammo so you get the best potency. P='s out of a 38 Special do not kick hard out of a service sized gun.

2) I doubt anyone would keep coming at you after being hit 10+ times with CCI Stingers in the face, neck, chest, groin, ect. This is a last resort however as in the case that you only have a 22 rifle!

3) Bigger bullets= Bigger Holes and Cavities ! You may want to try a 45 ACP at the range, it is big but that doesn't mean the kick is overbearing. In fact, the 45 ACP in my opinion is easier to handle than the 40 S&W.

Freedom great advise. I will add my twist to it as just a few years ago we
purchased a Rossi .357 Magnum revolver for my wife for home defense.

1) I strongly recommend a revolver for home defense, especially in your
case. They are simple to use, especially when you are half asleep and
stumbling around in the dark. Unless you extremely familiar with the use and
operation of a semi; for example (former) servicemen and the 1911 or the
Baretta for the younger guys. I would direct people away from semi's for
home defense. Foggy heads, complex weapon operation and lack of stressor
firearms training do not make a good combination in the middle of the night
with an intruder in the house.

I would look at a .357 Magnum revolver, you can shoot and practice with .38
Special ammunition but have the option of shooting .38 Spl and .38 Spl +P
ammo as well as .357 Mag ammo. One thing to keep in mind that a .357 Mag
and .45 ACP deliver similar foot pounds energy to the target.

My wife practices with light .38 Spl load but the gun is loaded with .357 Mag
Hollow point for home defense.

2) Get someone high on who knows what drugs; a bunch of .22's might not
slow them too much. I like the concept of splattering as much of their
internals on the wall as possible.

3) Find a gun store/range combination where they will let you shoot multiple
guns, typically you still have to pay for ammo, but the experience will be very
telling.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mongoose90 (Post 370579)
I think you should buy what YOU want and what FEELS GOOD in your hand. If it doesn't feel right then don't buy it. I think you made a good choice. Congrats on your first gun. :)

The following is agreed on by several ladies I know that shoot. "Shopping for
a handgun is like shopping for shoes, it is a very personal choice, not only for
fit but for function and fashion and not to be taken lightly."

You mention that you are a single Mom. I suggest you start weapons training
with your child(ren) at an early age, I started mine at age 5 and 6 at the
range with a .22 rifle (Keystone Firearms - Cricket rifle) drill them with firearms
safety all the time. If they want to see your handgun let them see it touch
and feel it, always unloaded of course, by doing this you take away the
mystery and mystique (is that redundant?) Locking it up and pretending it is
not there or drill them not to touch it ever only feeds their couriosity by
teaching them you diffuse that natural tendency to explore and learn as you
are feeding it.


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