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Educate me please on 1911,s


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Old 09-15-2017, 11:32 PM   #21
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Im looking forward to shooting the boys 1911.


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Old 09-15-2017, 11:49 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by headspace View Post
Among the many things I like about 1911s, I personally like all their safeties.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJhv0ttFXs4
I like the series 70... Much better trigger than the series 80. Again, get the ones you like.


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Old 09-16-2017, 12:20 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by JonM View Post
1911's were designed for a time before cnc or edm cutting machines and unskilled mass production. they are a firearm intended for craftsmen to assemble and handfit.

modern production methods can make mostly functional 1911's but none of them are guns i would stake my life on. if you truly want to own a 1911 that is what they used to be, you need to obtain one made before about 1970, or look to custom 1911 builders like wilson combat or nighthawk .

how most modern 1911's are made is the parts are made to fit and assembled with no more care than a ar15 is put together. usually by people who dont know which end of a file is the handle. such is the case with things like colts, springfield, ruger, kimber, s&w etc. thats why there are just as many stories of modern 1911's working as there of ones that dont.

today's mass produced 1911 wouldnt survive in the same environment and abuse ww2 or ww1 era 1911's existed in.

the 1911 is not a bad design by any stretch. its just that most of them arent built the way the designer intended them to be built, and that is the problem with 1911's
I appreciate your comments, however, the Springfield I bought new and I have shot since the early 90s, with enough rounds down to wear out a barrel, has been 100% reliable. The only times I ever had problems have been if I get tired and limp-wrist the thing. No extra amount of fitting or tinkering can improve on that. It was never a beauty queen, with the factory parkerized finish, but a beautiful, hand fitted, Wilson won't out-perform it. The only "improvement" I have ever made to it was have a jeweler insert gold dots into the sights for my elderly eyes, and I replaced grips with something that fit my hand better.

I think a 1911 is a gun that people either love or hate, but for someone who owns, what most people would consider a Lot of guns, the 1911 is my favorite, hands down. Browning's other masterpiece, the Hi-Power is a fun gun to own and shoot, and is probably a better design, but it still doesn't have the magic of the 1911.
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Old 09-16-2017, 03:21 AM   #24
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I appreciate your comments, however, the Springfield I bought new and I have shot since the early 90s, with enough rounds down to wear out a barrel, has been 100% reliable. The only times I ever had problems have been if I get tired and limp-wrist the thing. No extra amount of fitting or tinkering can improve on that. It was never a beauty queen, with the factory parkerized finish, but a beautiful, hand fitted, Wilson won't out-perform it. The only "improvement" I have ever made to it was have a jeweler insert gold dots into the sights for my elderly eyes, and I replaced grips with something that fit my hand better.

I think a 1911 is a gun that people either love or hate, but for someone who owns, what most people would consider a Lot of guns, the 1911 is my favorite, hands down. Browning's other masterpiece, the Hi-Power is a fun gun to own and shoot, and is probably a better design, but it still doesn't have the magic of the 1911.
many of the people i know, that collect and shoot 1911's, that truly appreciate them. also tend to truly appreciate the Browning Hi-Power, and even collect and shoot them as well.
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Old 09-16-2017, 03:35 AM   #25
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These are mine. I own a lot of different guns. But these are by far the sweetest shooters I have ever fired. Nothing compares to the trigger of a 1911.
File Type: jpg 20170411_203551.jpg (53.1 KB, 12 views)
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Old 09-16-2017, 05:12 AM   #26
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Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery
During the Second World War, several nations fielded their own version of the John Browning design or used elements of Brownings ideas in their weapons.

The Spanish Star Model B, French MAB model D, Soviet TT-33, Polish Radom Vis-36 were modifications of Browning and FN designs.
Some nations had their own licenced version of the M1911 like the rare Norway's Kongsberg Colt 11.25 m/m AUT. PISTOL M/1914

The not so common Argentine Sistema Colt Modelo 1927, which was itself a licensed copy of the Colt M1911A1, built under the supervision of Colt engineers and a less-expensive alternative to the Sistema Colt Modelo 1927 the Ballester–Molina.

The seldom encountered Mexican made Obregón a semi-automatic pistol designed in the mid-1930s by a mechanical engineer, Alejandro Obregón. It uses the same .45 caliber ammunition as the Colt 1911 and resembles it in overall appearance, frame size and weight. However, its short-recoil operating and barrel locking system employs a diagonal cam on the rear of the barrel sliding against a diagonal receiver-mounted groove to rotate the barrel, much like that of the Austro-Hungarian Steyr M1912 pistol.
Llama Firearms, officially known as Llama-Gabilondo y Cia SA, Spanish arms company founded in 1904 under the name Gabilondo and Urresti.
Around 1931 Gabilondo began to make copies of the Colt 1905 in .45 ACP and 9 mm Largo without a grip safety and with a nine-shot magazine. These were simply marked with the Ruby trademark and the calibre.
Gabilondo model Bufalo and Danton. Both guns were a great success, with one exporter alone shipping 100 pistols a day to the US. Production of the Danton was stopped in 1933.
The Llama trademark was registered in 1932 and pistols started to appear in 1933 based on the Colt M1911 and later the improved Colt model 1911-A1 model of 1924, but without the grip safety. Very early models were advertised in .45 ACP, 9mm Largo and 7.63mm Mauser. The Llama IV was the first numbered model to appear, and unusually, it was advertised as having a "tolerant chamber" capable of firing .38 ACP and 9 mm largo rounds interchangeably. The Llama V was chambered for 9mm Largo 38 acp, and 38 super, for sale in the US. The Llama VII was chambered for 9mm Largo and 38 acp and came it two different versions, a regular 5" length barrel and the Extra with a 5 1/2" barrel. There are reports of a Llama being bought by the British in 1944 for use by the S.O.E. but which gun cannot be confirmed if it actually happened.

Llama III-A 9mm corto/ .380 ACP

The Llama II was chambered in 9 mm corto/.380ACP with an eight-round magazine and without grip safety. The Llama III was introduced with a grip safety, locked breech and continued to be made until 1954.

So is it likely US collectors could encounter Llama weapons at a gun show? Yes!

I love shooting the Spanish Star Model B, after firing a 2-3 boxes you apprciate the recoil of the 9x19 Luger.

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Old 09-16-2017, 06:31 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Rex in OTZ View Post
Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery
During the Second World War, several nations fielded their own version of the John Browning design or used elements of Brownings ideas in their weapons.

The Spanish Star Model B, French MAB model D, Soviet TT-33, Polish Radom Vis-36 were modifications of Browning and FN designs.
,nations had their own licenced version of the M1911 like the rare Norway's Kongsberg Colt 11.25 m/m AUT. PISTOL M/1914
One time when I was living in Denver, Colorado I was lucky enough to visit a retired Army officers' weapons collection, along with all the military rifles he had a collection of 1911's and one of them was that Norway Colt model. I've owned one Colt Combat Commander and it was finicky on what ammo would work, I traded it off but I've always like the1911A1, my brother-in-law had one that was so worn that the firing pin retainer would slip down every so often, but as worn as it was, it was crazy accurate, loved shooting it. Don't know if I will ever own a 1911, I'd like to but with all firearms that I now have and considering my age and other expenses, van transmission went south and my 1989 F-250 diesel engine need replacing, I really doubt a 1911 is in my future.
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Old Today, 08:28 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by PaBushMan View Post
Why are they desirable? I'm debating on adding one to my collection. In time.
They are "desirable" purely on what people imagine them to be.

the 1911 is a great gun and very well suited to it's time, but it is now obsolete in comparison to other options.

Of course this does not mean the .45 ACP and the 1911 can't get the job done - they can absolutely, they simply aren't the most cutting edge solution.


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