Do you believe in limp-wristing?
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Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > General Handgun Discussion > Do you believe in limp-wristing?

View Poll Results: Is limp-wristing a common cause of semi-auto pistol malfunctions
Yes 38 84.44%
Undecided 1 2.22%
No 6 13.33%
Voters: 45. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-24-2014, 09:44 PM   #1
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Default Do you believe in limp-wristing?

There is evidence that "limp-wristing" is an urban legend among shooters. It is a false explanation of shooter-induced malfunctions. Please vote!



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Old 05-24-2014, 10:25 PM   #2
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limp wristing is not a myth by any stretch. its a descriptive term for loosely holding a handgun during firing allowing it to recoil nearly freely and twist via torque in the grip.

a loose grip allows movement of the hammer and hammer spring in such firearms to shift the poa as tension in the spring is released by the sear.

in semi auto's weak grip or "limp wristing" allows the firearm receiver to recoil rearward at the same time as the slide. if there is a loose enough grip the slide will not come back far enough to eject or load the next cartridge.

all this can and has been demonstrated in videos by using strings to activate the triggers in firearmslaying loose on tables or other devices designed to illustrate the effects of a loose grip or "limp wristing".

some semi auto are less susceptible to the effects some more so. the M9 berretta is not nearly as prone to malfunction from a loose grip as its a direct blowback design than something like a 1911 or glock which are delayed blowback.

in revolvers limp wristing can cause forehead denting if the cartridge is powerful enough


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Old 05-24-2014, 10:29 PM   #3
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i have seen it happen and know that it is very real.
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Old 05-24-2014, 11:14 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonM View Post
limp wristing is not a myth by any stretch. its a descriptive term for loosely holding a handgun during firing allowing it to recoil nearly freely and twist via torque in the grip.

a loose grip allows movement of the hammer and hammer spring in such firearms to shift the poa as tension in the spring is released by the sear.

in semi auto's weak grip or "limp wristing" allows the firearm receiver to recoil rearward at the same time as the slide. if there is a loose enough grip the slide will not come back far enough to eject or load the next cartridge.

all this can and has been demonstrated in videos by using strings to activate the triggers in firearmslaying loose on tables or other devices designed to illustrate the effects of a loose grip or "limp wristing".

some semi auto are less susceptible to the effects some more so. the M9 berretta is not nearly as prone to malfunction from a loose grip as its a direct blowback design than something like a 1911 or glock which are delayed blowback.

in revolvers limp wristing can cause forehead denting if the cartridge is powerful enough
They are all locked breech designs.

Here is the competing explanation. The problem is in anticipating recoil. Your hand makes a slight move to mitigate the upcoming recoil. The move is reflexive, therefore imperceptible. When the gun is totally still, even if held between two fingers, it will cycle. As long as it is held still until it fires.

What it practically means, you focus on the trigger pull without "anticipating". Keeping your wrists rigid is not that important, as long as you maintain good trigger control and target acquisition.
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Old 05-24-2014, 11:40 PM   #5
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Old 05-25-2014, 12:32 AM   #6
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Most people who are anticipating recoil drop their head among other mechanical errors. The moment I catch myself dropping my head I get the Colt Diamondback 22. Usually I get over it in just a few short sessions.
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Old 05-25-2014, 12:42 AM   #7
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Quote:
Do you believe in limp-wristing?
..

Proper hand gun grip, requires the wrist to be locked and "in-line" If not malfunctions will show up.. And recoil will be less manageable however significant that might be to the shooter.
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Old 05-25-2014, 12:53 AM   #8
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The so-called "limp wresting" phenomenon is a term for a real application of physics.

When held loosely, a Glock/S&W/SIG/make doesn't matter polymer frame pistol (most especially pistols chambered for lower power calibers that produce lower recoil forces, generally 9MM or .380 ACP) do not exert enough force on the heavy steel slide during the firing sequence to unlock, eject, and feed the next cartridge in the magazine.

If you hold a polymer frame pistol the way it was meant to be held, using a normal firing grip, it's pretty difficult to accomplish, but it can be done. Higher power loads tend not to have as pronounced a problem, but the problem can still occur.

The aluminum, steel, and titanium frame pistols have enough mass in the frame that it's just about impossible to accomplish. The issue is inertia. The aluminum/steel/titanium frames have more mass in the frame and so inertia is more difficult to overcome, consequently, the slide has something that won't move as easily to push against during recoil.

In layman's terms, inertia would be a resistance to a change in the state of motion of an object. Basically, it is more difficult to move a frame with a heavier mass, so the slide moves backwards on the frame with sufficient force to unlock, eject, and feed.

Thanks physics 101!
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Old 05-25-2014, 01:02 AM   #9
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Limp wristing as a cause for malfunction is VERY real. Trying to use it to explain aiming/impact errors is incorrect. Anticipating recoil is very different from limp wristing adn the two should not be discussed in the same sentence. A firm grip can still suffer from anticipating
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Old 05-25-2014, 01:15 AM   #10
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Rifleman, the video is wrong. The slide appears to be locked back after the fired shot. That's not a wrist issue.

But even then, if you look closely frame by frame, you will see her withdrawing the gun ever so slightly as she pulls the trigger. That's anticipation.


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