Break-in?
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Old 08-27-2010, 02:09 AM   #1
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Default Break-in?

Should new guns need break-in periods? I think that is a cop-out for just not finishing the fitting process of a firearm. I have owned guns that work flawlessly from day one on. Unless I am wrong, a gun shouldn't need a break-in period to work just like a car shouldn't need a couple thousand miles to start every time.

Discuss.

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Old 08-27-2010, 03:07 AM   #2
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It's a simple fact of life. Cars engines need a break-in period to let the piston rings find their own optimum contact areas, and it's the same way with firearms. With guns, the operator also experiences some form of break-in.

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Old 08-27-2010, 03:50 AM   #3
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If one continues to fire and use the firearm on a regular basis, in order to become more familiar with it's function, operation and accuracy, and one is secure in the fact from continued familiarization, that when you pull that trigger it will go bang every time, you are in essence breaking it in, and yourself as well, as stated.

I would not trust a firearm with my life and the lives of others, if I I have not thoroughly and repeatedly fired, and trained with it until I am comfortable with it's operation and it's uninterrupted function becomes a natural shooting extension of my own hand.

The more one fires a firearm, the more "harmonious" the various parts become to smoother operational function and accuracy, as well as one's self, IMHO.

1911 break-in period question

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Old 08-27-2010, 04:36 AM   #4
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Here ya' go.

Break-In & Cleaning

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Old 08-27-2010, 09:03 AM   #5
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The car engine analogy is a good one as the steel parts in the pistol must "mate" correctly before it smooths out. You can buy pistols that do not require a break in period - but they will cost you dearly. The custom shop 1911s, like Nighthawk, Ed Brown, Wilson are all hand fitted and hand lapped - hence the high cost.

Gun owners brought this on themselves as they have demanded tight tolerances and phenomenal inherent accuracy. The tighter the tolerances, the more the gun will need a break in period to function smoothly.

As others have said, putting rounds through your pistol is a real good thing as you're getting acquainted...

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Old 08-27-2010, 09:15 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iMagUdspEllr View Post
Should new guns need break-in periods? I think that is a cop-out for just not finishing the fitting process of a firearm. I have owned guns that work flawlessly from day one on. Unless I am wrong, a gun shouldn't need a break-in period to work just like a car shouldn't need a couple thousand miles to start every time.

Disgust
I've learned from many years of manufacturing and machining that everything having to do with metal needs a 'fit-in' process to work correctly.

Gl*ck type pistols are so sloppy that they don't need it, but they are 3/4 plastic too.

My Kimber required a break in, but it runs like a top. It's accurate too!

I've noticed that people who complain about break-in periods really aren't tinkering gun guys. I'm a tinkering gun guy. YMMV
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Old 08-27-2010, 09:56 AM   #7
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Any machine that has moving and interworking parts will need some type of break in period. There are things you can do to decrease the amount of time needed or protect the surfaces but the break in period is still required.
A car will start every time not because it's broken in but because the starting system and the engine are two completely seperate systems.

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Old 08-27-2010, 04:41 PM   #8
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Even if one were to polish all contact points in a gun, the two surfaces would still need to mate together. The engine analagy is quite appropriate.

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Old 08-28-2010, 08:12 PM   #9
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YES. If you get a new gun you should break it in. That means you should take it out and do alot of shooting with it. It may not impove the function of the gun, but it will make you a better shot and heck, it alot of fun.

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Old 08-28-2010, 08:59 PM   #10
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YES. If you get a new gun you should break it in. That means you should take it out and do alot of shooting with it. It may not impove the function of the gun, but it will make you a better shot and heck, it alot of fun.
Apparently I was misunderstood. I understand that any new firearm, especially when the controls aren't identical to the ones you already own, will require lots of training/familiarization. No, I'm not talking about that. I'm asking why we hear excuses for a weapon failing to be that it wasn't broken in properly (in other words it wasn't ready to be used from the factory).

I understand that building confidence with your firearm and testing the defensive loads you wish to use are important things you should do before you choose to employ a firearm in a defensive role. No, I'm not talking about that either. I just want to know why some manufacturers/people blame malfunctions on a gun not being "broken in" (not shot a certain number of times to ensure full reliability).

I don't like hearing, "Well the magazines are brand new... so of course it failed." Really? We can't expect new magazines to work 100%? Or, "Well of course it had <insert random failure> it hasn't been shot enough to wear all of the parts smooth." So companies don't ensure that firearms work before they sell them? The end user has to follow a certain "break-in doctrine" before the weapon can be counted on?
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