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Old 03-12-2010, 11:02 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by saviorslegacy View Post
Holy ****! You shoulda started a museum!
What was the most exotic thing that you guys found?
Also, what kinds of guns did you guys find?

:EDIT:
I found an old presidential button once. I think it is from the 1800's.
The best 'haul' I ever found, was in a cave that was dug into the side of a hill behind the NCO club on the base. Looking back now at what we did in that cave, I shudder to think how 'brave' or completely STUPID we were. About 100ft into the cave, it just disappeared into what looked like a flooded cave-in. Well, I got this 'notion' to put on my diving mask and snorkle and see if it went anywhere As STUPID as that was, since most of the caves were loaded with snakes, rats, bats, spiders, not to mention things that could go BOOM, it actually worked out, and I swam about 50ft under water to another room deeper in the cave.

It was there that I found the remains of a Japanese officer, in a kneeling position, clutching a small sword. From his position, it looked like he had committed seppuku, rather than surrender. The wakizashi sword he used was still in great condition, even over all the years. And in a kind of chest by his side, was the rest of the ceremonial robe, head piece, a tanto knife, and his samurai sword, along with personal papers. Across this room from him were a couple other remains, we thought they were probably his men, both looked to have been shot, execution style.

It was very surreal in there, because everything was almost like it just happened. The uniforms were pretty tattered, from decay and rats and other creatures eating on them. But the badges and insignias were in great shape. There were about 4 remains of Arisaka rifles, all rusted and would almost fall apart to the touch. Most of the stocks were eaten up. But the officer had a Nambu pistol that was protected in that chest. It was still kind of pitted, but in decent condition. Probably the thing that bothered us the most, was a collection of papers, including letters that GI's had written to family and girlfriends. We tried to make out names and addresses, but most had deteriorated too far.

So, I swam out and came back with plastic sheeting, garbage bags, whatever I could find to recover what we could. And most of it we did. Until I was getting ready to come back to the US for college. That's when US Customs found all that stuff and basically took it But, they did manage to contact the officer's surviving family, through the Japanese embassy in Manila, Philippines. Before I left, his family was flown to the base, the Air Force EOD team drained the water out of the cave, and they recovered the remains for the family. I was rewarded by someone who turned out to be the officer's grandson, for finding him and his men. My reward...a complete Nikon F2 camera system, including almost every lens they made, motor drives, tripod, case, you name it. Turns out, his family was very high up in Nikon's corporate structure, so that explained the gifts, as he put it, it was the best he could do. Only one problem...I would have rather kept the things I found But I gratefully accepted the gifts, and was glad that the families could finally have some closure, almost 33 years later.

We still have friends who live out there, and they still have some of the other things we found out there. That includes the remains of a 1919 machine gun, 4 garands, a S&W model 10, a couple Lee Enfields, a few kyu gunto swords, helmets, radios, and all kinds of badges, patches, hats, etc. I left it all with them, because I knew I could not sneak it out past the Air Force and US Customs. So they have my collection. Oh well....

Slo


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Old 03-13-2010, 01:15 AM   #12
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The best 'haul' I ever found, was in a cave that was dug into the side of a hill behind the NCO club on the base. Looking back now at what we did in that cave, I shudder to think how 'brave' or completely STUPID we were. About 100ft into the cave, it just disappeared into what looked like a flooded cave-in. Well, I got this 'notion' to put on my diving mask and snorkle and see if it went anywhere As STUPID as that was, since most of the caves were loaded with snakes, rats, bats, spiders, not to mention things that could go BOOM, it actually worked out, and I swam about 50ft under water to another room deeper in the cave.

It was there that I found the remains of a Japanese officer, in a kneeling position, clutching a small sword. From his position, it looked like he had committed seppuku, rather than surrender. The wakizashi sword he used was still in great condition, even over all the years. And in a kind of chest by his side, was the rest of the ceremonial robe, head piece, a tanto knife, and his samurai sword, along with personal papers. Across this room from him were a couple other remains, we thought they were probably his men, both looked to have been shot, execution style.

It was very surreal in there, because everything was almost like it just happened. The uniforms were pretty tattered, from decay and rats and other creatures eating on them. But the badges and insignias were in great shape. There were about 4 remains of Arisaka rifles, all rusted and would almost fall apart to the touch. Most of the stocks were eaten up. But the officer had a Nambu pistol that was protected in that chest. It was still kind of pitted, but in decent condition. Probably the thing that bothered us the most, was a collection of papers, including letters that GI's had written to family and girlfriends. We tried to make out names and addresses, but most had deteriorated too far.

So, I swam out and came back with plastic sheeting, garbage bags, whatever I could find to recover what we could. And most of it we did. Until I was getting ready to come back to the US for college. That's when US Customs found all that stuff and basically took it But, they did manage to contact the officer's surviving family, through the Japanese embassy in Manila, Philippines. Before I left, his family was flown to the base, the Air Force EOD team drained the water out of the cave, and they recovered the remains for the family. I was rewarded by someone who turned out to be the officer's grandson, for finding him and his men. My reward...a complete Nikon F2 camera system, including almost every lens they made, motor drives, tripod, case, you name it. Turns out, his family was very high up in Nikon's corporate structure, so that explained the gifts, as he put it, it was the best he could do. Only one problem...I would have rather kept the things I found But I gratefully accepted the gifts, and was glad that the families could finally have some closure, almost 33 years later.

We still have friends who live out there, and they still have some of the other things we found out there. That includes the remains of a 1919 machine gun, 4 garands, a S&W model 10, a couple Lee Enfields, a few kyu gunto swords, helmets, radios, and all kinds of badges, patches, hats, etc. I left it all with them, because I knew I could not sneak it out past the Air Force and US Customs. So they have my collection. Oh well....

Slo
You went treasure hunting and find **** like that.
I went treasure hunting and found..... arrow heads and a partial Native American pipe.
I think you came out on top TBH. Treasure hunting for WW2 stuff is one of the coolest things I have heard yet.

You should go back there on vacation and crap and retrieve some of your stuff. Boy what I would do to go WW2 treasure hunting.

In other news...... I was just talking to a friend of mine from Austria and he said that they had just found a bomb under a road using radar or something. The road crews can't get to it right now because it is in the middle of an intersection. LMAO Man it must suck knowing that you are driving over a bomb. They said that the likely hood of it damaging anything in a case of it exploding is low since there is a layer of concrete and asphalt above it. That and the likely hood of it being set off is low. They are supposedly going to shut that section of town down this summer when there are fewer tourists.

I wonder when people will stop uncovering this kind of stuff.
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