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Old 04-29-2013, 03:42 AM   #31
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Mosin, here in South Western Wyoming you may hunt wolves. No season, no licenses needed.

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Old 04-29-2013, 03:51 AM   #32
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Some one setting in the middle of urban America on the east coast setting the rules for the real world. You don't know a Damn thing about Public Lands. What the hell do you imagine? The eastern mind set is wolves are under orders to stay on Public Lands.
This is not Lassie these are free roaming killers that kill for control of "Turf". Private lands in the West surround and are interspersed with Public Lands. The livestock industry is the back bone of the economy in many parts of the West. When the Feds crack down on fishing you low landers go nutts. But of course that is your income.
These animals are destroying big game herds and domestic live stock as well. They have to be controlled. The Grey Wolf is a non native species forced on the Western states by Enviro Greens.They have killed of the native wolves.
For you "Beach Bunnies" this is a small Wyoming wolf.
Daaam...Is that pic photo shopped. Or do they really get that big....
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:56 AM   #33
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Every time this issue comes up I see posts about grey arctic wolves being native and how they were killed off and on and on.
The fact is arctic grey wolves are from the arctic north above the lower 48 where they feed mainly on huge caribou herds they follow.
Here in Idaho the native wolves were timber wolves that are a much smaller specie.
When the arctic grey wolves not native to Idaho were introduced the timber wolves were far and few and rarely seen. Now they are never seen because the arctic grey wolves killed the remaining timber wolves off.
Coyotes are killed on site by wolves and have never been a huge problem like wolves here. They are to small to bring down elk and moose and there worst thing is to attack deer being born but don't do that very often. They go after smaller game.
Being as the northern part of Idaho and north western Montana are not farm or ranching country live stock is not the big problem with them.
Here they kill elk for fun and can tell a pregnant cow elk and like to take them down and tear the fetus from the womb and eat it and leave the cow elk to die a slow death.They will kill any canine they see and that means peoples dogs.
For pictures of this go to save the elk .com.
In eastern Montana and southern Idaho where the valleys are wide and farming and ranching are possible they have the problems with them taking live stock.
The elk deer and moose here do not run in herds of thousands and don't migrate like caribou.
We live in steep mountains with tiny valleys with very little to no flat land and no one has perfected a tractor or technique to farm the country. If you remove the vegetation from the mountians here all the top soil washes down hill during winter run off any way.
Many people not from this area picture ranches and farms dominating the state and think every one from Idaho grew up on a potatoe farm or ranch.
I was in my mid twenties when I first travelled to southern Idaho ten hours drive south and seen my first potatoe field.
In winter here the snow gets twenty feet deep in the mountains and its not uncommon to have three feet of snow over night in the valleys in our yards.Elk and deer sink in deep snow and once it is not powder snow and firms up they cannot plow through it and have to jump to move ahead.
So the game comes down so they can scratch through the snow and feed off trees etc and still be able to move.
Wolves how ever can run across old deep snow during a bad winter and the elk and deer are helpless.A man on snow shoes can keep up with a elk in old snow five foot deep.
The winters them selves claim a lot of elk during bad winters then add the wolves who kill for fun and leave them laying every day.
Snow mobiles are very popular here and our fees for permits are used to buy and maintain and pay operators to pack hundreds of miles of dirt roads closed in winter for snow mobiling.
The elk and deer can walk on this compacted smooth surface and use them as well to get around.
Riding a snowmobile here where you travel many times a hundred miles in a day on these groomed roads you come across many many dead elk un eaten and torn up by wolves.
During tough winters you some times see wolf packs from the free way chasing elk.
Three years ago walmart shoppers watched a pack chase elk and kill them from the parking lot across the freeway.
Our elk herds are so decimated that there is now a bulls only season
The wolves here so far have not posed a threat to humans because of the abundance of elk and deer here and the fun they get killing them.
They are also beginning the be a htreat to the bears here both black bears and griz because they will go right into a den and drag out the cubs and eat them while the mothers is in hibernation.
We have always had thousands of black bear here and in our yards year round seeking a free bee in the trash cans etc.
Black bears can be very dangerous and grow a lot bigger here than back east. But bears do not hunt in packs or kill for fun.
They also eat what they kill.
Idaho always has had huge numbers of elk and deer as well and every thing balanced out.
But introducing a non native specie here of huge wolves has done what it does any where a non native carnivore is introduced.NON NATIVE the grey wolves were never hunted here to extinction because they were never here.
Native Timber Wolves were NOT extinct here before the arctic grey wolves were introduced either. Now they are.
In 1986 the right to work law was introduced reducing wages and devastating the middle class. People here live in poverty in large numbers and must fill the freezer every year to get buy.
I used to feed my wife and two kids on a elk and a deer for a year.I had to supplement that with trout and grouse I shot. My wife would most of the time get a elk and always a deer.
Many many people live that way here and most of us shot bull elk before we turned thirteen and prefer a big cow elk for meat.
Cows are also easier to find.
Now due to the wolves we have to kill bulls only and its more difficult to hunt them down.
Unlike many places back east where you can kill more than one deer we are limited to one deer either a whitetail or mule deer. Even a large mule deer will not feed a family very long.
So you can understand why we despise the wolves and the tree hugging eco nut cases who pushed for there introduction.
Many people have no Idea how many species of wolves there are or where they are native to. The tree huggers play on this and go out of there way to drop the arctic from the name of the wolves where they are native to and use wolves only to designate all species.
They refuse to acknowledge that here we have always had huge bear populations as well as cougars and we never had a problem with the size of our elk herds and we also have bad winters that claim a few elk and deer.
Not until these NON NATIVE ARCTIC GREY WOLVES were introduced into a environment they never existed in before and have raped our woods.
What do you think would happen if salt water crocodiles were introduced in florida and half the people in the usa thought they were the same as American crocs and the tree huggers pushed this lie like they do with the ARCTIC GREY WOLVES from the arctic.
Look at what the Burmese Pythons are doing in florida and the snake head fish.
Look at what hogs are doing in many states especialy in Texas.
I have talked to Texans who tell me the hogs crossed with the Russian bores will hunt you down and eat you and it is not uncommon to use a 45-70 to stop them charging.
Thank you for shedding light on the real story. I thought we were talking about the native timber wolf. Killing just for the sake of killing is bad with any species, man or wolf. Time to put the fear of man back into those grays.
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:13 AM   #34
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Here is some facts that might make an avid hunter change his or her mind. Which would you rather have an abundance of Wolves or Elk? OI saw an article today about the Idaho Wolves. Guess I never realized how big they got. The article also advised that each on of them in the picture would kill an estimated 24 Elk each year! WOW! I knew they were becoming a serious problem but I guess I did not comprehend the severity and impact. How about it you guys and gals from Idaho and the area?
Here is part of the article from my post in June:

The Canadian Gray Wolf runs in packs of up to twenty wolves. For every one animal they kill to eat, these Canadian wolves kill about three more just for the fun of it. The biologists call it "sport-reflex killing" or "lustful killing". The Canadian Gray Wolf is a killing machine. These are federal wolves, as it was the federal government who introduced them into Idaho over our objections. They told the State of Idaho that the wolves would be considered recovered when they had a total of 100 wolves in Idaho.Now they have between 800 and 2,000 wolves and the situation is out of control. Idaho 's wolf emergency is a state issue. And in this situation, the State of Idaho has both a duty and the authority to protect its people and their property. House Bill 343 lays out the facts, the argument and the authority to do so. - Idaho Rep Phil Hart.
Can you imagine gun control out there.
This is not a good place to let the cat out. Make sure you are packing protection when you go for a walk in the mountains. You never know when a wolf pack might surround you!
bvioulsy from the facts in Idaho the facts are they are desimating the Elk Herd there!

idaho-20wolves.jpg   idaho-20wolf.jpg  
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:38 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Sniper03 View Post
Here is some facts that might make an avid hunter change his or her mind. Which would you rather have an abundance of Wolves or Elk? OI saw an article today about the Idaho Wolves. Guess I never realized how big they got. The article also advised that each on of them in the picture would kill an estimated 24 Elk each year! WOW! I knew they were becoming a serious problem but I guess I did not comprehend the severity and impact. How about it you guys and gals from Idaho and the area?
Here is part of the article from my post in June:

The Canadian Gray Wolf runs in packs of up to twenty wolves. For every one animal they kill to eat, these Canadian wolves kill about three more just for the fun of it. The biologists call it "sport-reflex killing" or "lustful killing". The Canadian Gray Wolf is a killing machine. These are federal wolves, as it was the federal government who introduced them into Idaho over our objections. They told the State of Idaho that the wolves would be considered recovered when they had a total of 100 wolves in Idaho.Now they have between 800 and 2,000 wolves and the situation is out of control. Idaho 's wolf emergency is a state issue. And in this situation, the State of Idaho has both a duty and the authority to protect its people and their property. House Bill 343 lays out the facts, the argument and the authority to do so. - Idaho Rep Phil Hart.
Can you imagine gun control out there.
This is not a good place to let the cat out. Make sure you are packing protection when you go for a walk in the mountains. You never know when a wolf pack might surround you!
bvioulsy from the facts in Idaho the facts are they are desimating the Elk Herd there!
Makes a good argument for why you might need a high capacity mag...maybe 2......
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:49 AM   #36
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Thanks for all of the details. I understood there was a problem in the farms and ranches, but that far exceeds what I knew. When do we get together?

So naive question - other than the pelt, is there any additional value to the remains?

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Old 04-29-2013, 04:57 AM   #37
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readygirl, That is the real deal. The photo is one of an actual kill. The wolves killed 12 sheep and 3 Great Pyrenees Dogs just south of my place. They are killing moose calves just for fun.

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Old 04-29-2013, 05:16 AM   #38
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S.S.S.

Nuf Said

Tack

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Old 04-29-2013, 08:57 AM   #39
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Yes and i would have no hesatasion shooting somthing atacking the dogs. But i wouldint shoot everything that might atack my dogs just incase.
Manta, let me start by saying that I respect your opinion, and I ask nothing more of you than to extend the same courtesy to me. Contrary to popular belief, most of us that hunt do not do so for the sake of killing, or killing for no reason. I have shot many coyotes and woodchucks in the area I live in. It is how I pay for the leases on the land my family hunts on. A little background.

20 years ago when my family moved up here, we made friends with several dairy farmers and horse owners. As a result we have about 2,000 acres of hunting land at our access, and the cost each year is to help with planting and harvest work, and to keep the predator populations in check. It also includes policing the pastures for groundhogs and other burrowing rodents. Let me try to explain why.

If a groundhog burrow gets stepped in by a horse, especially at a full run, that horse may have to be put down due to a broken leg, not to mention what it could do to the rider. If it is not put down, there is a good chance that it will be lame for life. If the horse has to be put down, you lose the money that has been spent on that horse and any future generations it would have sired or birthed. This can be devastating to the owner's of said horses, not only emotionally, but also financially. If the horse is from a premium bloodline, you could be talking about a few hundred thousand in losses.

When it comes to beef or dairy farmers ( we have a lot in my area, including several amish families), you also have to take into account the loss of the revenues from the sale of beef and dairy products from generation 1 to every subsequent generation after that. Coyotes are not picky, they will go after an injured horse or cow, a new born calf, or they are just as happy to raid the chicken coop. I don't know how many farmer;s you know, but I don't know a single one who is rich from his or her chosen career. If you know any farmers who have a farm that is not running in the red, listen to them and take notes. They are few and far between.

I generally do not hunt what I will not eat, but for certain species I do make an exception. Coyotes and groundhogs are 2 of them. In addition to the loss of livestock, the coyote population out here has managed to thin out the whitetail deer populations in this area, as well as most of the smaller huntable rodent and bird populations in some of my old hunting spots. I have seen them kill fawns, cats, medium sized dogs, and wild turkeys many times over the years. As a result, lands that my family members have hunted for generations, are not the hunting spots they once were. The non-predators have moved to other areas to try to get away from the coyote packs. The coyotes then follow then into more densely populated areas, and this puts the general public at risk.

10 years ago I lived in a small city on Lake Erie, and over a 12 year period I almost hit 5 coyotes, and 4 deer running out of people's back yards, on to major roads within said city. I hit 3 deer within 2 miles on my home in a 4 year period. Add to that almost a dozen coyotes in that same 4 years. I will give them one thing. The number of stray cats and dogs declined drastically over the time that I lived there. Just imagine what a large pack of wolves could do in a city of say, 15,000, or within a 5 mile area that is primarily farms with livestock. Not something I would like to see.

Now, I do have some recipies for fox, skunk, coyote, possum, and several other animals that most folks would think of as inedible (anyone up for raccoon fondue? It's not that bad really.) Bear burger is one of the main ingredients in one of my best chilli recipies, and I have some great marinades that I soak the steaks in for 48 hours before cooking them. Point is, I, like most of the hunters I know, don't hunt "just to kill". I hunt for the meat when it is possible, and I hunt for predator control and to help keep the herds at an appropriate size for it's own ecosystem. The remains from any animal that I shoot but do not eat does not go to waste. it gets used as bait on the next hunt, or it gets buried on some of the pasture land where it break's down and goes back into the soil over time. In other words, worms and other scavengers have got to eat to.

There is also a certain rush in hunting predators. To know that if you mess up the shot, you could very well get severely injured or killed gets the heart pumping like few other things can. On the other side of the coin, predator hunting is much more challenging than hunting the usual prey animals. They are hard wired to spot traps and ambushes, which means you have to outsmart something that survives by hunting. It's something that everyone who hunts should try at least once. Success will make you a better hunter, and every time you go afield you learn something new. Just some food for thought.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:42 AM   #40
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We had the same problem with ground hogs in south central PA, used to get 5bucks per pig. My deer rifle at the was a 25-06 built on a 98 action. I would take shots on whistle pigs out to 600 yds. It was considered pest control. Also ate ground hog, pretty tasty, like stringy beef.

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