Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Discussion Forums > The Club House > True Love and Loyalty

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-27-2014, 07:42 AM   #11
Podcast Host/ American Patriot/DAV!
FTF_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DrFootball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Northern Arizona(Fmr. NYC & L.I.)
Posts: 7,092
Liked 2824 Times on 1938 Posts
Likes Given: 565

Default True Love and Loyalty

Sorry for your hardship, and loss of LADY. All Dogs go to Heaven...across the Rainbow Bridge,..


Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk



__________________

Dr. Bill(Dr.Football)
CWO-4 US ARMY Ret./Med.
Proud to be a Soldier, Proud to be a Night Stalker!
The 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment(S.O.A.R.) The Army's Taxi for Special Operators *NSDQ*

DrFootball is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 07:45 AM   #12
Administrator
FTF_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
G30USMC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 6,039
Liked 1025 Times on 724 Posts
Likes Given: 157

Default

I am also a pushover when it comes to dogs



__________________
G30USMC is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 07:56 AM   #13
Podcast Host/ American Patriot/DAV!
FTF_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DrFootball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Northern Arizona(Fmr. NYC & L.I.)
Posts: 7,092
Liked 2824 Times on 1938 Posts
Likes Given: 565

Default True Love and Loyalty

A week from Saturday( June. 7th) Gator will be with us Exactly 2 years. He is the most Loyal and loving dog I have ever personally known, and if it had not been for him and my wife, I might be dead right now( , he even scares Witnesses off our Front Porch,...


Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk

__________________

Dr. Bill(Dr.Football)
CWO-4 US ARMY Ret./Med.
Proud to be a Soldier, Proud to be a Night Stalker!
The 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment(S.O.A.R.) The Army's Taxi for Special Operators *NSDQ*


Last edited by DrFootball; 05-27-2014 at 07:59 AM.
DrFootball is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 09:49 AM   #14
Big TOW
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WebleyFosbery38's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Irish Settlement CNY
Posts: 5,131
Liked 5664 Times on 2805 Posts
Likes Given: 6027

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kfox75 View Post
Hey. When you folks are done with 'em, pass me the Kleenexes please.......

Rrminds me of when I got sick in November of 2005. Those who have been around here for a while know that I am an amputee. The short version is I got an infection in my left foot that went gangrenous, and they had to cut part of it off. I also had the start of blood poisoning from the fact that (Yep, I'm a dumb azz on this count ) I had gone to work for close to 2 weeks with gangrene.

What I have never told on here is what follows.

I was in the hospital for close to 2 months, on top of being sick for a month prior to me admiting myself. i had a Golden Retriever mix named Lady at the time who i had kept when wife #1 left me 4 years earlier. I had rasied the dog from about 6 months on when i got her as an emaciated pup with a broken leg and ribs, so I was the one she had bonded with.

Imagine if you will, what had to be going through the dogs mind when i left for work that morning, smelling like death ( had a dream the night before where I answered a knock at my door to find the Grim Reaper standing there. told him to eff off, and went back to bed. At least I think it was a dream.)I was told when my blood work came in, that by all rights, I should have been wheeled in on a gurney, instead of walking in like I did, and that I, quite frankly, should be dead or comatose. I have no doubts that , to my dog, I smelled dead.

I spent a week in the local hospital, and then I was transfered to a region trauma center in Buffalo, where the first of 2 surgeries were performed on my foot. During this time, my wife, dad, step-mother, grandfather, grandmother, and a couple of my uncles were going back and forth to visit and bring me more books and clothes. I would call home once every couple of days, and in person and on the phone I would ask how my dog was doing. No one would tell me anything more than "alright" or "Just fine." i knew something was wrong, but they did not want to worry me. that in it's self told me something wasn't right.

About a week before Christmas, I was sent home, and my wife drove up to mget me with my truck. On the way home, no mention of Lady was made, so i was preparing myself for the worst. She backed the truck into the driveway, and I saw the upper apartment door open. I saw my daughter coming down the stairs, and saw a flash of yellow head for the driver's side door. I opened my door, and saw the dog's tail coming around the front of my truck. What happened next was sad, touching, and terrible aall at the same time.

When I had gone into the hospital, Lady was just over 100 pounds, and she still had all of her fur. The dog that I saw was around 70 pounds and missing large patches of her hair. It was still Lady, but I can see some of the reason no one would tell me how she was while I was in. She was not eating, and from what I found out later, she would sit by the door, whining, scratching at the door, and falling asleep sitting up. waiting for me to come home, or to get out and find me. it still breaks mt heart to think about it now.

The most touching part of the whole homecoming was this. As i sat in the passenger seat of my truck, and Lady came around to the door and saw me there, I got to see what surprise looks like on the face of a dog. She walked over to see who was in the truck, looked up at me, took 2 steps back, and just sat. No movement, no sound, just a shocked look on her face that words will never do justice to. It took her almost a minute to get the nerve up to walk over and sniff me to make sure I was really there. At that point she jumped up into the cab whining, nudging me, and beating me with her tail.

It took close to four months for her to put the weight back on and he r hair to grow back. I wasn't allowed to leave the house without her for about 2 months. Lady wouldn't let me out of her sight when I would try to leave, and she spent a good amount of time going back and forth to ECMC with me for my appointments. She would just lay there, on the seat of the ruck, and go to sleep while I was inside for my check ups. I didn't mind. My truck doors would lock and unlock from the inside, but using the key from the outside was problematic to put it mildly (took close to 20 minutes once to unlock them, so I never bothered locking them again). It worked out good for both of us.

I had to have her put down in July of 2011 after finding out that she had cancer. I had gotten her in early 1997, and she had been a large part of my life since then. She was my pet, but she was also a companion and friend when i needed one the most in my life. She helped me keep my sanity when my divorce got rough, and she was that one "person" who I knew would never abandon me in my time of need. I think that the world would be a much better place, if more folks would listen to the lessons our dogs could teach us.

While I find the story of Capitan to be a tear jerker, I am not surprised by it. Having been blessed with canine companionship and loyalty most of my life, I know the bond between dogs and their humans is an almost unbreakable one. i have the remember love and memories that prove it that will be with me the rest of my life.

Sorry about the long post, but I felt this should be shared with my other family.

Lady

1996 to 2011.
Holy Crap K, that sounds terrible, amputation then seeing your pooch in such bad shape! God bless the good years you had with your foot and your furry companion. I bet she made the one loss easier to learn to live with than most humans could have. Funny how a simple lick in the face can make a person forget about things they dont care to think about, Dogs know!
__________________
WebleyFosbery38 is online now  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 07:02 PM   #15
No Longer a NY Resident.
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kfox75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Erie County PA,
Posts: 2,434
Liked 1491 Times on 914 Posts
Likes Given: 7363

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WebleyFosbery38 View Post
Holy Crap K, that sounds terrible, amputation then seeing your pooch in such bad shape! God bless the good years you had with your foot and your furry companion. I bet she made the one loss easier to learn to live with than most humans could have. Funny how a simple lick in the face can make a person forget about things they dont care to think about, Dogs know!
Thanks WF. It was a combination of several things that helped me cope with my trans-metatarsal when it was all said and done. My family was there for me through all of it, including the dog and some very close friends.

While I was in ECMC's long term care wing, I shared a room with a guy who had broken his neck at work, (City of Buffalo employee who rolled a street sweeper ) and I found out that one of the kids my mother and I used to baby-sit was in as well. Visiting him gave me a much better perspective on what i had been through.

Greg is the brother of my "adopted" sister who's family shares our Erie house. 3 months before my stay, he stepped out on his porch, and his left leg fell through one of the boards, breaking his femur about 12 inches below the hip. He was taken to the same hospital where I started my journey into this part of my life, x-rayed, and they only saw that the bone was broken. What they did not see is that, as he twisted during the fall, his femoral artery was twisted and blocked off as well. It was close to 5 hours before this was discovered, and he was shipped up to ECMC. By the time he got there, the leg below the break was a loss. They took it 10 inches below the hip.

They kept him in the long term care wing (floors 5 and 6) for almost a year. 2 skin graft attempts, both failed (mine took first time out, done on Thursday, sent home on Saturday). so he spent 8 months on a wound vac after the second attempt. hell, compared to what he went through, I got off easy, and I thank the Lord every day for that.

Where Lady also comes in to this story is when she was around 3 YOA, I took her to training to be a therapy dog. I used to take her to the nursing homes in my area on nights I had off, and up to Roswell, ECMC, and Women's and children's Hospital in Buffalo on the weekends. She loved tha attention, and the residents and patients got to think about something other than what they were going through for a little while. Being able to do something that puts a smile on a cancer stricken child's face is one of the greatest gifts there is, and I am honored to have had the chance to have even a small part in doing so.

On some of the trips to my appointments where she rode up with me, I would swing by the nurses stations on floors 5 and 6, and check to see if I could bring the dog up to visit some of the residents. Sometimes we would go room to room, others the staff would bring the residents to the community room for our visits. My wife, daughter, and i would make sure she was bathed and brushed the night before, and I always had her paperwork in order for a visit when i would go up there. Between the residents, the dog, and myself, I really can't say who enjoyed these visits more.

Greg was going to PT 3 times a week, and most trips up or us were on at least one of these days (Mon., Wed., Fri., and my appointments were always Monday or Friday mornings). It got to a point where if I was spotted by one of the LTC staff they would stop and ask me if I had the dog with. When I did, they would give security and the bosses a heads up, and I would come back in with the dog after seeing my doctor. The last stop we would make on those days was to stop in and spend an hour or two with greg before heading home. It helped him to relax, and we all enjoyed visiting with old friends. Part of what kept him going was those visits, and they had the same affect on me.

Guess you could say time spent with family, whether it's blood or not, is something you can never put a price on. Lady and i had a large extended family. i still have thank you and holiday cards from some of the folks we visited with over the years, and I got more than one thank you call from parents of the children at W&C and Roswell. I can look back at those calls from a parent telling me that 3 days after our visit their son or daughter was still talking about it, and wants to know when we will be back up. There were a few of them asking me if I would go to the services for their child as well. they were sad days, but the parents and I could still smile thinking back on the moments of happiness we brought to their children, and that they brought into my life as well.

Some called us a blessing. I say we were the ones who were blessed. Even before I lost half of my foot I had plenty of evidence that it could always be worse. I have just as much proof now that that is still true. greg said something to me a couple of years ago that I have found to be very true. "What happened to us is a magnifier, if you were a d!ck before it happened, you will just be more of a d!ck afterwards. If you were a good person before, you will be a better person afterwards." I can vouch for that, but I can also say that a good dog can bring out the best in even the worst of people. For proof of this, check out the link below.

https://www.idahohumanesociety.org/programs/idapi/
__________________

Is it better to do the right thing for the wrong reason, or to do the wrong thing for the right reason? If you do the wrong thing for the right reason, is it still the wrong thing?

Si vis pacem parabellum.

To those who wish to take away our Second Amendment rights. What will you do when we, all 100,000,000 of us, stand as one, and say no?

kfox75 is offline  
Axxe55 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 07:13 PM   #16
The Apocalypse Is Coming.....
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Axxe55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: East Texas, Texas!
Posts: 27,328
Liked 19997 Times on 11368 Posts
Likes Given: 50448

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kfox75 View Post
Hey. When you folks are done with 'em, pass me the Kleenexes please.......

Rrminds me of when I got sick in November of 2005. Those who have been around here for a while know that I am an amputee. The short version is I got an infection in my left foot that went gangrenous, and they had to cut part of it off. I also had the start of blood poisoning from the fact that (Yep, I'm a dumb azz on this count ) I had gone to work for close to 2 weeks with gangrene.

What I have never told on here is what follows.

I was in the hospital for close to 2 months, on top of being sick for a month prior to me admiting myself. i had a Golden Retriever mix named Lady at the time who i had kept when wife #1 left me 4 years earlier. I had rasied the dog from about 6 months on when i got her as an emaciated pup with a broken leg and ribs, so I was the one she had bonded with.

Imagine if you will, what had to be going through the dogs mind when i left for work that morning, smelling like death ( had a dream the night before where I answered a knock at my door to find the Grim Reaper standing there. told him to eff off, and went back to bed. At least I think it was a dream.)I was told when my blood work came in, that by all rights, I should have been wheeled in on a gurney, instead of walking in like I did, and that I, quite frankly, should be dead or comatose. I have no doubts that , to my dog, I smelled dead.

I spent a week in the local hospital, and then I was transfered to a region trauma center in Buffalo, where the first of 2 surgeries were performed on my foot. During this time, my wife, dad, step-mother, grandfather, grandmother, and a couple of my uncles were going back and forth to visit and bring me more books and clothes. I would call home once every couple of days, and in person and on the phone I would ask how my dog was doing. No one would tell me anything more than "alright" or "Just fine." i knew something was wrong, but they did not want to worry me. that in it's self told me something wasn't right.

About a week before Christmas, I was sent home, and my wife drove up to mget me with my truck. On the way home, no mention of Lady was made, so i was preparing myself for the worst. She backed the truck into the driveway, and I saw the upper apartment door open. I saw my daughter coming down the stairs, and saw a flash of yellow head for the driver's side door. I opened my door, and saw the dog's tail coming around the front of my truck. What happened next was sad, touching, and terrible aall at the same time.

When I had gone into the hospital, Lady was just over 100 pounds, and she still had all of her fur. The dog that I saw was around 70 pounds and missing large patches of her hair. It was still Lady, but I can see some of the reason no one would tell me how she was while I was in. She was not eating, and from what I found out later, she would sit by the door, whining, scratching at the door, and falling asleep sitting up. waiting for me to come home, or to get out and find me. it still breaks mt heart to think about it now.

The most touching part of the whole homecoming was this. As i sat in the passenger seat of my truck, and Lady came around to the door and saw me there, I got to see what surprise looks like on the face of a dog. She walked over to see who was in the truck, looked up at me, took 2 steps back, and just sat. No movement, no sound, just a shocked look on her face that words will never do justice to. It took her almost a minute to get the nerve up to walk over and sniff me to make sure I was really there. At that point she jumped up into the cab whining, nudging me, and beating me with her tail.

It took close to four months for her to put the weight back on and he r hair to grow back. I wasn't allowed to leave the house without her for about 2 months. Lady wouldn't let me out of her sight when I would try to leave, and she spent a good amount of time going back and forth to ECMC with me for my appointments. She would just lay there, on the seat of the ruck, and go to sleep while I was inside for my check ups. I didn't mind. My truck doors would lock and unlock from the inside, but using the key from the outside was problematic to put it mildly (took close to 20 minutes once to unlock them, so I never bothered locking them again). It worked out good for both of us.

I had to have her put down in July of 2011 after finding out that she had cancer. I had gotten her in early 1997, and she had been a large part of my life since then. She was my pet, but she was also a companion and friend when i needed one the most in my life. She helped me keep my sanity when my divorce got rough, and she was that one "person" who I knew would never abandon me in my time of need. I think that the world would be a much better place, if more folks would listen to the lessons our dogs could teach us.

While I find the story of Capitan to be a tear jerker, I am not surprised by it. Having been blessed with canine companionship and loyalty most of my life, I know the bond between dogs and their humans is an almost unbreakable one. i have the remember love and memories that prove it that will be with me the rest of my life.

Sorry about the long post, but I felt this should be shared with my other family.

Lady

1996 to 2011.
better pass those tissues over this way Kfox. i got dust in my eyes again!

you both were blessed to have each other.

something i have said before, but will repeat it again. most of us that are dog lovers or animal lovers and bring them into our lives and make them a part of our family, know that a vast majority of the time, we will outlive them. andyet we do it anyways, knowing the pain we will feel when they leave us. for many of us, that pain is overshadowed by the joy and the companionship they bring to us in our everyday lives.

the bond that brings us together, between a person and a dog, is one that is special and one we can never have with another person. they can sense our emotions and how we are feeling without us ever saying a word. reaslistically, there is nothing they can do to solve our problems or make our problems go away, or make our hurt disappear, but knowing they do really know that something is wrong and the fact that they pick up on that, and will sit in silence and suffer with us, tells of how much they do care about us.

they never judge us. they never lie to us. they will never abandon us. they never bring up our faults or shortcomings. they never expect more than we are capable of achieving. they will never stab us in the back, or cheat us. it would be nice if people could learn how to treat each other by just learning from our dogs. if people learned to treat each other the way our dogs treat us, this world would be a much nicer place.

i have a saying, that the more i learn about my dog, the less i have use for some people. i will accept the loyalty of my dog over the so-called loyalty of some people i know. i know the depths of the loyalty of my dogs. very few people in my life have come close to the same level of loyalty in my life.
__________________
Coming From The Village Of The Damned.
Resist All Tyranny And Oppression.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil, is that good men do nothing." Edmund Burke.
Axxe55 is online now  
kfox75 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 07:30 PM   #17
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Eagle1803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: missouri
Posts: 863
Liked 631 Times on 372 Posts
Likes Given: 406

Default

Good story Kfox, I have a German Shepherd that is the same way, very loyal.


I always said if theres a dog heaven, thats where I want to go.

__________________


Criminals, thugs and dopeheads-Do not tread on me or my family

keep your liberals at bay, so the eagle can pick them apart.
Eagle1803 is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2014, 01:30 AM   #18
No Longer a NY Resident.
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kfox75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Erie County PA,
Posts: 2,434
Liked 1491 Times on 914 Posts
Likes Given: 7363

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axxe55 View Post
better pass those tissues over this way Kfox. i got dust in my eyes again!

you both were blessed to have each other.

something i have said before, but will repeat it again. most of us that are dog lovers or animal lovers and bring them into our lives and make them a part of our family, know that a vast majority of the time, we will outlive them. andyet we do it anyways, knowing the pain we will feel when they leave us. for many of us, that pain is overshadowed by the joy and the companionship they bring to us in our everyday lives.

the bond that brings us together, between a person and a dog, is one that is special and one we can never have with another person. they can sense our emotions and how we are feeling without us ever saying a word. reaslistically, there is nothing they can do to solve our problems or make our problems go away, or make our hurt disappear, but knowing they do really know that something is wrong and the fact that they pick up on that, and will sit in silence and suffer with us, tells of how much they do care about us.

they never judge us. they never lie to us. they will never abandon us. they never bring up our faults or shortcomings. they never expect more than we are capable of achieving. they will never stab us in the back, or cheat us. it would be nice if people could learn how to treat each other by just learning from our dogs. if people learned to treat each other the way our dogs treat us, this world would be a much nicer place.

i have a saying, that the more i learn about my dog, the less i have use for some people. i will accept the loyalty of my dog over the so-called loyalty of some people i know. i know the depths of the loyalty of my dogs. very few people in my life have come close to the same level of loyalty in my life.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle1803 View Post
Good story Kfox, I have a German Shepherd that is the same way, very loyal.


I always said if theres a dog heaven, thats where I want to go.
QFT guys. It is said that the best of us leave for the other side of the viel way too soon. this is true when it comes to our dogs. i agree with Axxe, if more folks would stop and listen, our dogs could teach us to be better people.


__________________

Is it better to do the right thing for the wrong reason, or to do the wrong thing for the right reason? If you do the wrong thing for the right reason, is it still the wrong thing?

Si vis pacem parabellum.

To those who wish to take away our Second Amendment rights. What will you do when we, all 100,000,000 of us, stand as one, and say no?

kfox75 is offline  
Axxe55 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
LGS Loyalty aandabooks The Club House 13 02-10-2013 09:14 PM
Love this Video. It's so true! silverado113 Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 15 07-01-2012 06:10 PM
Question of buyer loyalty Angry_bald_guy The Club House 9 08-25-2010 02:24 PM
Tangolicious and Barry...true love suprdave The Club House 12 12-17-2009 05:18 PM
True love. skullcrusher The Club House 5 09-17-2009 01:21 PM