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556plinker 09-24-2010 03:21 AM

Tips, recipes for smoked meats
 
I've noticed that a lot of people on here like to grill and I think it would be neat to start a thread sharing ideas, tips and recipes on various types of smoked meats to include chicken, brisket, pork shoulder, loins or ribs.

To START: One of my favorites is Italian cherry smoked chicken quarters.

Pretty simple, just buy a 10lb bag of chicken quarters, 1 beer, 2 bottles of italian dressing and you are good to go. Open the bag of chicken quarters and pour the entire contents of one bottle into the bag....after draining off the blood. Then seal it back up, put in the fridge for about an hour. Make sure you turn the bag upside down a few times to evenly distribute the dressing.

Take the other bottle and mix it with a 12 oz. beer. Use this to keep your chicken "wet" prior to and after it starts to brown so you dont dry it out.

I prefer cherry wood but sometimes it might be hard to get depending on your location. Hickory is an acceptable alternative and Apple might be the best but I haven't tried that.

Cook the Chicken until its done without the chicken being directly over the fire. ( I have a chargriller and not a smokebox so you should know what I'm talking about...if not ask.

Excluding the charcoal you should be in for 10-12$....unless you drink a lot of beer while doing this.

ENJOY.

skullcrusher 09-24-2010 03:33 AM

Umm, 225 for 2 hours is not nearly long enough for the chicken to get done. :eek: When you do this, what is the finish temp of the meat? Internally, I mean. Also, what is the temp at the level of the meat? Not on your grill thermometer, but at the level of the meat. Just asking. I've been known to do a bit of smoking.

Huge risk of salmonella contamination if you don't get the temp of the meat up enough to kill the bacteria.

556plinker 09-24-2010 03:43 AM

good point
 
I can hold 225 on the thermometer so I'm guessing 250 but I dont ever test it.......probably not wise to advise temp readings and I probably shouldn't have given out a time table as well. I dont use a thermometer, and have not gotten sick to date. Needless to say, cook this until its done to your satisfaction. I think the key is to have the outside mostly blackened without drying out the meat. Therein lies the fine line between good and great.

skullcrusher 09-24-2010 04:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 556plinker (Post 356443)
I can hold 225 on the thermometer so I'm guessing 250 but I dont ever test it.......probably not wise to advise temp readings and I probably shouldn't have given out a time table as well. I dont use a thermometer, and have not gotten sick to date. Needless to say, cook this until its done to your satisfaction. I think the key is to have the outside mostly blackened without drying out the meat. Therein lies the fine line between good and great.

Temp and time are critical, imo. I was just pointing out that 225 (most meat is smoked between 255-250) for only 2 hours is bad advice as there is no way that the chicken will be fully cooked.

Great point that is should be cooked until done...:rolleyes:

lonyaeger 09-24-2010 06:43 PM

Cook chicken to AT LEAST 165 degrees. To be completely safe, take it to 180.

And chicken doesn't really benefit from slow cooking NEARLY as much as brisket or pork shoulder or something like that. As a matter of fact, I try to cook chicken at about 425 degrees so I get the nice crispy crackly skin.


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