"Skilled Care facilites".....aka nursing homes......... - Page 3
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"Skilled Care facilites".....aka nursing homes.........


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Old 10-19-2012, 04:59 PM   #21
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I would read to the residents sometimes when my FIL was asleep or being bathed just to pass the time. There were some really neat people there.
I have wondered if such places were making computers or ipads available for reading. Adobe and some other apps will read text aloud pretty well now.
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:46 PM   #22
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My FIL passed on in April of 2007. The place he was in for the last few weeks (he was back and forth in the hospital for the beginning of that) was decent, clean and well staffed. No terrible by any means though. They had "advanced care" where the residents were invalids, but even they would be encouraged to be social and eat in the dining room. It was difficult but not at all a house of horror. I would read to the residents sometimes when my FIL was asleep or being bathed just to pass the time. There were some really neat people there.
I know what you mean. I'll start a conversation and talk to anybody just about anywhere. I don't hardly pass someone on the street without saying "hello". I am getting to know some of the residents at my Dad's place. I'll chat with any of them at any given moment.

On another note, I went to see my Dad do his physical therapy today. I am amazed at how much progress he's made. It is incredible. Two months ago I truly thought he was dying and would only be with us a few more months. I don't feel that way anymore. He is walking fairly long distances (for him), he does not sleep constantly, he is alert and active. I am so pleased.
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Old 10-21-2012, 03:06 AM   #23
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I have wondered if such places were making computers or ipads available for reading. Adobe and some other apps will read text aloud pretty well now.
I dunno, I enjoy reading and people like my voice. Don't care too much for reading aloud off of an iPad or computer. I can't imagine that the elderly residents would like a computer reading to them much. Heck, I can't say I would like it too much, and I'm not elderly. The biggest problem that people have in those situations is the lack of caring human contact outside of the hired caregivers they see every day, and reading to them helps to relieve that problem. They also love it when pets are brought in to visit with (though my pets are not sociable enough to do well in those situations.)

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I know what you mean. I'll start a conversation and talk to anybody just about anywhere. I don't hardly pass someone on the street without saying "hello". I am getting to know some of the residents at my Dad's place. I'll chat with any of them at any given moment.
I tend to be the same way. I got to know several people when my FIL was in the convalescent home. One of them was a Veteran and was just the most wonderful person. His last name was Wimpy, but after hearing some of his stories from when he was in the service, and what he did after he got out, it was obvious he was anything but a wimp! When he was moved to a different facility I would go visit him there as well. He passed away several months later. Wonderful guy and his family was wonderful as well.

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On another note, I went to see my Dad do his physical therapy today. I am amazed at how much progress he's made. It is incredible. Two months ago I truly thought he was dying and would only be with us a few more months. I don't feel that way anymore. He is walking fairly long distances (for him), he does not sleep constantly, he is alert and active. I am so pleased.
Sounds like he is doing well! My thoughts are with him.
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:50 AM   #24
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They also love it when pets are brought in to visit with (though my pets are not sociable enough to do well in those situations.)
In my hospital experience, pets brought in to socialize with the residents have some rules. The animal must, of course, be up to date on shots and also must have proof of a negative parasite screen within the last 6 months. They also must have a Companion Animal Certification which is proof your dog understands and obeys certain commands and is calm and social.

When my Mom was dying, I had a Boston Terrier my Mom loved. They would let me bring the dog in to visit my Mom. As we walked through the halls to my Mom's room, the residents sitting in wheel chairs in the hallway all wanted to pet him. Even if they couldn't speak, their hands would reach out.
I'd hold the dog for each of them to pet. Boston Terriers were very popular in the 1950's and several of the residents would relate their experiences with the breed. When I got to my Mom's room I would put the dog on her bed and he'd just curl up and lay with her while she pet him.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:34 AM   #25
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My Mom died last year after battling Parkinson's for 15+ years, it was just as bad as you might imagine and maybe worse. She and my step father stayed with us for some of that but 24 hour helpers are very expensive and at some point werent enough. She spent her last 1.5 years alive in a skilled nursing Parkinsons unit that cost nearly 100k a year and it was all self pay. It was necessary but virtually decimated all of her savings because she didnt shelter her assets 20 years before.

Most of us envision getting old, going to sleep and not waking up! Sounds good if you say it fast enough but its not reality. Most of us will outlive our Bodies. many will outlive our minds, how we prep for that is crucial to passing gracefully.

Nursing homes are no way to live but nearly the only way to die once youve attained the body and mind that comes with being 80 in the USA. Sucks bad, no great answers from me, just a sad realization that nothing can change that if your lucky enough to get old!
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:51 AM   #26
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My Mom died last year after battling Parkinson's for 15+ years, it was just as bad as you might imagine and maybe worse. She and my step father stayed with us for some of that but 24 hour helpers are very expensive and at some point werent enough. She spent her last 1.5 years alive in a skilled nursing Parkinsons unit that cost nearly 100k a year and it was all self pay. It was necessary but virtually decimated all of her savings because she didnt shelter her assets 20 years before.

Most of us envision getting old, going to sleep and not waking up! Sounds good if you say it fast enough but its not reality. Most of us will outlive our Bodies. many will outlive our minds, how we prep for that is crucial to passing gracefully.

Nursing homes are no way to live but nearly the only way to die once youve attained the body and mind that comes with being 80 in the USA. Sucks bad, no great answers from me, just a sad realization that nothing can change that if your lucky enough to get old!
The sad reality is that while modern medicine has extended the average lifespan it has not been very good at increasing the quality of that additional lifespan people have. Quality over quantity I say.

Now I do realize that there are many people who live long lives but not due to modern medical science, both of my grandmothers and my aunt are of that stoic breed. But even they lived longer than the really wanted to. My aunt only went to a doctor once in her 90 year long life, and that was because she was brought into the emergency room against her wishes. She did see one other doctor and that was my brother, he did a house-call so that she could qualify for state assistance towards the end of her life.
My Dad died suddenly and unexpectedly, which is what he wanted. He was terrified that he would languish away in pain but that did not happen.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:43 PM   #27
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Yeah, troll me, what do I know?

After all, I just worked at an

Assisted Living Facility, had an aunt they

placed at the 124,000/annum care tier status,

and, oh, snap! Her sister, my mother, has the same

problem...

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Old 10-22-2012, 10:21 PM   #28
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It seems like were moving further away from the answers than embracing the real answers. It costs less to care for someone in their own home for so many but they get all or nothing so many enter prematurely. Before I could get my Mom into a Parkinsons unit, The local Hospital transferred her to a mostly state filled nursing home that turned out more to be a $6,500 a month (Self Pay) Fleabag Hotel. Literally she got head lice and scabies for the first time in her life (and she was a teacher). It took me a month to get her out. Well over half of the residents were fully ambulatory and 75% were Medicare/ Medicaid payed.

It was more like a multipod dormitory. The hospital that sent her there swore they were perfect for her! I get ill just thinking about it!!!
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Old 10-23-2012, 02:54 AM   #29
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It seems like were moving further away from the answers than embracing the real answers. It costs less to care for someone in their own home for so many but they get all or nothing so many enter prematurely. Before I could get my Mom into a Parkinsons unit, The local Hospital transferred her to a mostly state filled nursing home that turned out more to be a $6,500 a month (Self Pay) Fleabag Hotel. Literally she got head lice and scabies for the first time in her life (and she was a teacher). It took me a month to get her out. Well over half of the residents were fully ambulatory and 75% were Medicare/ Medicaid payed.

It was more like a multipod dormitory. The hospital that sent her there swore they were perfect for her! I get ill just thinking about it!!!
Sounds like an institutionalized track versus a family decision. Is that accurate?
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Old 10-24-2012, 11:31 AM   #30
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Sounds like an institutionalized track versus a family decision. Is that accurate?
Absolutely, you split the arrow right down the center.

Look at the way things were and where they are going. Birth, Life and decline to death cycles in the early 1900's are coming back as they should. The Family home is also the perfect Nursing Home if you prepare and care. Our Grandparents didnt leave the responsibility for raising their kid in the hands of others yet we will pay them back by giving them 24 hour sitters in an institution that doesnt resemble anything to do with home.

Im taking this afternoon off to retrofit an 89 year old friend of mines house with pull bars and shower seats. He had a stroke a month ago (his second one) and he can come home to his 84 year old wife (whos dying of cancer) if we we just do a few things to make his home safer for him. I cant say if he will be there a week, a month or a year but he was smiling from ear to ear yesterday as we walked around with the Therapist in his home instead of the Nursing Facility! They will be bringing him back about 6pm tonight so Ive got my work cut out for me but its worth it to see them together in there home if not just for that moment!
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