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Old 12-11-2010, 04:14 PM   #21
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Actually, I am quite mechanically enclined. In my younger years I used to change the oil in my car, I've put in a starter. I can troubleshoot, repair, maintain and replace parts in any analyzer here in the lab where I work and I actually enjoy doing that. And after I replace, repair or maintian these analyzers, I can calibrate them to be sure they're working properly. Yes, I'd say Im pretty mechanically inclined, to say the least.
Sounds like you aren't afraid of digging in and getting your hands dirty, so I would say you are 80% along the way already.

So what would you do if you had to service a brand new model of analyzer that you've never worked on before? How do you begin to approach the problem? What would be the first step you would take to get the job done if they dumped this in your lap at work?

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I'd like to be able to be familiar enough with my gun to take it apart and put it back together. I don't think it's difficult and I'm sure, if shown, I would be able to do it easily.
IMO a revolver is one of the most complex mechanisms you'll likely come across in the firearms arena. But I'm not a professional gunsmith so that could be taken as being BS from others with formal training...

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Yes, I'd love to talk shop here and know some theory. I'll get there. You're right, HP, I just need to give myself time.
I'm quite sure you WILL get there WOC. My motto is: You can't fix anything unless you know how it is supposed to work first. One thing you might consider doing is buying an old clunker parts gun (CHEAP) and taking it apart. Take pictures as you remove each piece and study how the parts interact with each other. After it's apart, put it back together again using your pictures as a step by step guide in reverse. If something doesn't go right or something breaks, it's no big loss on a clunker - but the knowledge you gain from it will be priceless.

You might also spend some time on the web studying some animations as well:
Genitron.com - Interactive Illustrated Revolver

http://www.m1911.org/loader.swf

I sure as heck ain't no big dog. But it sounds like you have the same internal drive as a lot of us folks that want to learn to be self sufficient. Some "pros" take offense at that notion though, so your sometimes damned if you do - and damned if you don't. Do what works for you and be happy. JMHO.
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Old 12-11-2010, 06:09 PM   #22
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I wouldn't make Joe drive down here. He's a very busy man and anyway he works at the gun range we're going to be shooting at. All I've found around me so far is a very small gun range associated with the gun shop I bought my gun at and I'm always the only one there when I go and another range that is only open to the public the last Sunday of every month. I have driven to the town Joe lives in several times as I have a girlfriend who lives there. It's a nice, peaceful, scenic drive.

"Winds, you add a great deal to this forum. Everybody starts at zero. We all did and you're doing just fine."

Very true. I'm just coming into this about 40 years later than many here.
I was just kidding around, hope it didn't come across wrong. Glad you are here.
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Old 12-11-2010, 06:45 PM   #23
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HP, I'm not afraid of getting my hands dirty at all. I used to joke with my friend from Cali that I think I'm half guy. When we get a new analyzer in at work we get some extensive training and one or two of us techs are sent to the city where these instruments are made and we are giving intensive training for several days. After the analyzer is installed, a rep from the company stays for a few days and gets us all familiar with the analyzer. The tech or two who is sent away for training becomes the "go to" person for any troubleshooting on those instruments. We do get a lot of hands on, very guided training.

I always thought a revolver was way less complex than a semi-auto pistol. I may be mistaken. But why, then, is a revolver often recommended as a good beginner gun?

I'm gonna quit whining and get doing.

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Old 12-11-2010, 07:37 PM   #24
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But why, then, is a revolver often recommended as a good beginner gun?
That's actually a very good question. Back in 08' when I lived in NY I went to the local shop and wanted to purchase a AR rifle and a semi auto pistol. Now I had never owned either and explained such to the salesmen. He immediately suggested a pump action shotgun and a revolver, even pulled an entry model of each out and began his spiel.

Although i had no experience with either i had done a lot of research, I found this place and read all that I could and had even been to other shops to get a "feel" for what I wanted. I had no interest in a pump shotgun or a revolver - I still don't.

So why did this guy suggest that I should get back into shooting with them?
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Old 12-11-2010, 09:01 PM   #25
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I always thought a revolver was way less complex than a semi-auto pistol. I may be mistaken. But why, then, is a revolver often recommended as a good beginner gun?
Less complex to operate, therefore better for a "beginner".
More complex to work on due to more fragile parts and critical geometries that must be in perfect tune with each other in order to work properly. Again - just the opinion of a self taught nobody.

You must work for a really great company. Most places I've worked would forgo the training and just tell you to "figure it out...".
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Old 12-11-2010, 11:35 PM   #26
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You must work for a really great company. Most places I've worked would forgo the training and just tell you to "figure it out...".
I work in a hospital lab reporting out medical results from pretty sophisticated analyzers. It would be almost criminal to tell us to "figure it out". Doctors and patients depend on the accuracy of their test results to diagnose, treat and monitor the progress of the patients. We are inspected by several agencies to ensure the accuracy of the analyzers and the knowledge of the technologists. In a typical 10 hour shift I probably spend about 3 hours checking and logging temperatures, quality control on each analyzer, maintenance. There are log sheets and documentation like you wouldn't believe. We could withstand the scrutiny of any lawyer or judge, should any patient feel they did not get the proper care and takes the hospital to court for a lawsuit. I've been a medical technologist since 1979 and I have never grown bored with my job yet. Every analyzer we have is inspected and preventative maintenance is done twice a year by a field tech from the company who makes them. There is no, absolutely no room for error in what I do. Also, twice a year each tech is given an "unknown" to test. We are given a specimen and told what tests to run on it. We must send in our results to the testing agency and our answers better be what they expected them to be.

That being said, I can't think of any company worth their salt, hospital lab, car makers, home builders, etc. who should tell their employees "figure it out". To me, that's just looking for trouble.
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Old 12-12-2010, 12:56 AM   #27
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I can't think of any company worth their salt, hospital lab, car makers, home builders, etc. who should tell their employees "figure it out". To me, that's just looking for trouble.
That is SOP in the construction industry
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Old 12-12-2010, 01:03 AM   #28
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In my area, we are always getting "It never did that before!" and have to figure it out with documentation that may or may not be correct after all these years and upgrades.

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Old 12-12-2010, 04:03 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by winds-of-change View Post
HP, I'm not afraid of getting my hands dirty at all. I used to joke with my friend from Cali that I think I'm half guy. When we get a new analyzer in at work we get some extensive training and one or two of us techs are sent to the city where these instruments are made and we are giving intensive training for several days. After the analyzer is installed, a rep from the company stays for a few days and gets us all familiar with the analyzer. The tech or two who is sent away for training becomes the "go to" person for any troubleshooting on those instruments. We do get a lot of hands on, very guided training.

I always thought a revolver was way less complex than a semi-auto pistol. I may be mistaken. But why, then, is a revolver often recommended as a good beginner gun?

I'm gonna quit whining and get doing.
I believe that revolvers are recommended because they do not need to dismantled under normal circumstances.
The complex part of a revolver is the timing.( complex enough that my Python that I have had for 43 years has never been apart)
My series 80 Gold cup on the other hand is taken down almost every time it I use it.
Hang in there we need some people that are not all knowing.
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Old 12-12-2010, 08:27 AM   #30
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I believe that revolvers are recommended because they do not need to dismantled under normal circumstances.
The complex part of a revolver is the timing.( complex enough that my Python that I have had for 43 years has never been apart)
My series 80 Gold cup on the other hand is taken down almost every time it I use it.
Hang in there we need some people that are not all knowing.
That is probably very true.

The friend who recommended a revolver as a first gun for me was because when you open the cylinder, empty is empty. With a pistol, when you remove the mag, it's not necessarily empty. Since I was greener than grass when it came to guns he didn't want any accident when it came to me and guns.
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