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Old 05-17-2014, 05:43 AM   #41
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That is interesting. I have noticed this as well. I have a degree in carpentry, but most of my work has been in precision sheet metal. I can switch between fractions and thousandths at will. It has served me well.
My early training was in carpentry also, but I have done just enough metal work to think in thousandths when I have too but it is not "at will" like it is for you. I have some mental gymnastics to get through first for the transition. Being able to switch back and forth at will would indeed serve a person well.
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Old 05-17-2014, 09:44 AM   #42
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One of my early jobs years ago was doing basic cad wiring diagrams. The boss would come in and yell at my if i wasnt using the snap setting which snapped the cursor to the closest line. He would say its all drawn to snap so use the snap function. But it wasnt. None of them were. They were his drawings.

When you zoomed the plans in the original drawings were all free hand. So of course everytime they built a power panel it would be off and the techs would come in for corrections . Thd lead engineer, my boss, would come in and yell at me for producing drawings that were wrong scale....

So one day i went through and copied one of the madter drawings he created and set universal snap to put every line to grid and then inserted the changes. I then took the drawing to the owner and took the original in handed it to him and said here is why your always running over cost...

I got fired by the head engineer after he got chewed out for not using the snap function.

Not all engineers are good people.
I agree, actually, Im a technician that does some engineering. I have dealt with too many things engineers designed that should have stayed on the drawing board longer than they were (or never left). I get working on a piece and start wondering what they were thinking when they buried X under Y, Z, A and F when they knew for sure X would need to be changed long before anything above it would be even worn. Then throw in the translation in the Tech Manual that makes more sense to someone in Korea than here and thats why technicians are often heavy drinkers.

"Remove the fixers that attach the powa suppry to the chasty and reprace defrective cromponent with encrosed regrurator as shown".

Not kidding, some of the early manuals from Japan and Asia as a whole were just terrible. Better off just going on a hunt than reading it!

When it comes to machining or tool and die making, I know Im a slop carpenter equivalent for sure. My TD buddy in the shop next door immediately comes in to check me out when he hears me fire up the dremel or drill press and start grinding. He's a pro at spinning steel into anything he wants, Im in awe just watching him! I do it just to get a rise out of him sometimes, "what are you doing JR?". "Nothing Gair, just cutting X to fit in Y spot"? Usually, he ends up walking out with X and Y in his paws and making it for me (perfectly of course).
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Old 05-17-2014, 10:31 AM   #43
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That video reminds me of a time I was requested to attend a certain town's Public Works meeting to explain why we needed such a large piece of equipment to pick a heavy precast concrete structure and set it in a 20 ft. deep excavation. One of the board members spent 15 minutes explaining how a contractor that built a deck in back of his house used a JD 510 combination backhoe and it did everything he needed to do. I got about a dozen members eyes staring at me like they were wondering what my problem was then I explained the structure we needed to set weighed more then two JD 510's put together. They kept staring at me like "so what just do it with the JD 510".

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Old 05-17-2014, 10:49 AM   #44
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That video reminds me of a time I was requested to attend a certain town's Public Works meeting to explain why we needed such a large piece of equipment to pick a heavy precast concrete structure and set it in a 20 ft. deep excavation. One of the board members spent 15 minutes explaining how a contractor that built a deck in back of his house used a JD 510 combination backhoe and it did everything he needed to do. I got about a dozen members eyes staring at me like they were wondering what my problem was then I explained the structure we needed to set weighed more then two JD 510's put together. They kept staring at me like "so what just do it with the JD 510".
Yes but a farmer could and would get it done with 2 pigeon toed Allis Chalmers, a Farmall, a few telephone poles and a couple come-alongs! Its amazing what you can do when you dont have money or a degree in engineering but you do have a barn in the wrong place!

A buddy of mine had his 150 year old dairy barn moved 8" in a freak windstorm a couple years back, part of it was hanging off the rubble foundation. His insurance paid him to demo the barn as a total loss but it wouldnt have built one 1/3rd the size so he moved it with his tractors, a dozer and some giant blocks of concrete he buried to anchor them for pulling.

He moved the 150' x 80' barn, took him a few days but its back where its supposed to be with no damage to the barn or foundation and he ended up with a good bit of jingle in his pocket. The bunker blocks will stay buried right where they are for life!
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Old 05-17-2014, 10:52 AM   #45
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Yes but a farmer could and would get it done with 2 pigeon toed Allis Chalmers, a Farmall, a few telephone poles and a couple come-alongs! Its amazing what you can do when you dont have money or a degree in engineering but you do have a barn in the wrong place!

A buddy of mine had his 150 year old dairy barn moved 8" in a freak windstorm a couple years back, part of it was hanging off the rubble foundation. His insurance paid him to demo the barn as a total loss but it wouldnt have built one 1/3rd the size so he moved it with his tractors, a dozer and some giant blocks of concrete he buried to anchor them for pulling.

He moved the 150' x 80' barn, took him a few days but its back where its supposed to be with no damage to the barn or foundation and he ended up with a good bit of jingle in his pocket. The bunker blocks will stay buried right where they are for life!
True but, in the construction world, OSHA would have you put in jail if you tried those techniques on a project funded with State and Federal money.
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Old 05-17-2014, 11:25 AM   #46
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True but, in the construction world, OSHA would have you put in jail if you tried those techniques on a project funded with State and Federal money.
Osha is pretty new to rural CNY, most of them know better than to come here. We call them O****.

The local Amish and Menonites are far more adventurous and dangerous than a Small Dairy farmer with a 70 year old tractor could ever be. I watched them replace a Gambrel roof on an old dairy barn once, OMG was that bizarre and dangerous. 70' in the air on a pitch that was nearly vertical, 10 guys with beards and black coats hanging off a couple extension ladders laid on the roof and tied off on the other side. They did the entire roof in one day, a General Contractor wouldnt have even had his job trailer set and these guys were done.

They can build a post and beam barn in a weekend, 3o guys with poles pushing an entire side of the barn in one shot without a single engine is amazing. Whats even more amazing is they have very few accidents or injuries that I am aware of, they are dangerous cautiously.

Its the Enlish (Us) that do dumb things like hook two full hay wagons to a little ford 611 with less than 50 HP and lousy brakes and drive it all down a giant hill! Seen it, not pretty, lots of hay everywhere and bent steel!
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Old 05-17-2014, 11:53 AM   #47
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The Amish, and those that live like them, are those that will do best when the SHTF at TEOTWAWKI.

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Old 05-17-2014, 12:10 PM   #48
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128 ounces of dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) = 1 gallon.
1 gallon of DHMO weighs 8.3 pounds.
8.3 pounds = 132.80 ounces.
132.80 - 128 = 4.8 ounces of DHMO left over.
Yeah, but you're trying to reconcile OZ. weight VS. OZ. volume. I don't think it works that way, no?
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I don't see what the problem is. Everybody is being nice, and getting along, and I, for one, am learning stuff. So, if you don't like the discussion, don't look at the thread. Or, simply cut to the chase, and close it.
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Old 05-17-2014, 01:06 PM   #49
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Yeah, but you're trying to reconcile OZ. weight VS. OZ. volume. I don't think it works that way, no?
Yeah I know, but how do I save the Hydric acid I keep getting left over? I'm a prepper and I've been trying to dehydrate it to make it lighter, save space, and last longer, but it's not working well.
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Old 05-17-2014, 01:36 PM   #50
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Ahhh engineers vs. the regular joe. Interesting topic on a gun forum; however, you have now stepped into to my world. I am no engineer, I came up from the field and now in an office job, but I have a crap load of engineers that support me. Here is how it works in my world. The way we are structured is – when a request is made it will either be funneled to one of the engineering groups or…well, me, the dumb ass (da). From there the engineer will come to the da and say, “I need to do this project, tell me how to do it so I can put the numbers to it and write it up”. On the other hand, if it comes to the da (that’d be me) I go to the engineer and say “I am doing this project, tell me the numbers so I can write it up”. Ehhh, not exactly like that, but just as a simplification how it kinda works for us. Either way, I essentially supply the secret decoder ring and they supply the technical pixy dust.

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