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Old 11-07-2013, 01:23 AM   #311
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I was told to keep your head level with the horizon (assuming the horizon is level) while leaning. Works for me on my Harley. No, I don't lean it like a sportbike, but I do more leaning than I should sometimes. I have cut back on spinning the rear tire while in a curve, though. I was getting way too brave doing that.

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Old 11-07-2013, 01:57 PM   #312
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Uh, does that have any relation to what kind of bike you're riding? To get my chin anywhere near my handlebars, I'd have a hell of a stretch.

The bike I'm looking at buying? I'd have to almost fold myself in half.

The bike I want? Nuh uh. Not happenin. It'd be easier to autofellate.

I can totally see this on a sport bike. Oh yes, very easily. A little more difficult on cruisers or choppers with tall or wide bars and forward foot controls.

Or am I completely off base? I don't have much experience on a street bike, only had mine for a couple months now, and I've logged a little over 4 thousand miles in my lifetime, MAYBE. But I don't see me making that reach on the style of bike I prefer, or this bike I have now, which is based on the old flat track bikes of the 70's and 80's, but some idiot put mini ape hangers on...
Trip, yes riding positions differ with different types of bikes. I spent most of my years on Japanese bikes from the 70's and 80's street bikes and motorcross,which were more of an upright style,opposed to a cruiser style bikes of today.

The few things i've learned through the years of riding,some I learned the hard way,as in OUCH! lol

Always ride your ride,never let anyone push your comfort riding envelope on 2 wheels.

Ride as though you're invisible and no one can see you,because a lot of times they don't.

Intersections are the most dangerous place for a motorcycle.
When approaching a cross intersection with traffic I always cover my brakes ready for a fast emergency stop and keep an eye on the lead vehicles front wheel,that's where you will see the first and slightest movement on a vehicle if they're pulling out in front of you.

While stopped in traffic or stop lights keep it in gear,constantly watch your mirrors,leave yourself enough room from the vehicle ahead of you in case some airhead behind you fails to stop and wants to add you as a hood ornament,you may have enough space and time to pull forward into your escape route.

Always ride defensive, and Never out ride your Guardian Angel.

I also highly recommend riders safety courses,they really emphasis safe and defensive riding skills and in our state you get a break on Ins. rates for passing the safety courses these days.

That's a great looking bike you're looking at there Trip
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:30 PM   #313
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Default Slow Speed Maneuvers

Check out this Officers riding skills,Amazing!!

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Old 11-07-2013, 02:38 PM   #314
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Check out this Officers riding skills,Amazing!!

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw1JCdMnE0Y
I've seen their obstacle course too. Those guys rely are amazing.
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:44 PM   #315
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Check out this Officers riding skills,Amazing!! Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw1JCdMnE0Y
Here's another amazing one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQkGb2lrs_A&feature=youtube_gdata
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:04 PM   #316
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Trip, yes riding positions differ with different types of bikes. I spent most of my years on Japanese bikes from the 70's and 80's street bikes and motorcross,which were more of an upright style,opposed to a cruiser style bikes of today.

The few things i've learned through the years of riding,some I learned the hard way,as in OUCH! lol

Always ride your ride,never let anyone push your comfort riding envelope on 2 wheels.

Ride as though you're invisible and no one can see you,because a lot of times they don't.

Intersections are the most dangerous place for a motorcycle.
When approaching a cross intersection with traffic I always cover my brakes ready for a fast emergency stop and keep an eye on the lead vehicles front wheel,that's where you will see the first and slightest movement on a vehicle if they're pulling out in front of you.

While stopped in traffic or stop lights keep it in gear,constantly watch your mirrors,leave yourself enough room from the vehicle ahead of you in case some airhead behind you fails to stop and wants to add you as a hood ornament,you may have enough space and time to pull forward into your escape route.

Always ride defensive, and Never out ride your Guardian Angel.

I also highly recommend riders safety courses,they really emphasis safe and defensive riding skills and in our state you get a break on Ins. rates for passing the safety courses these days.

That's a great looking bike you're looking at there Trip
Lots of good advice here.
The Rider classes might not be mandatory, but they are an extremely good idea nonetheless. Even if you've done one before, but you've been away for a few years, it's worth doing again. It's amazing how much you forget. Motorcyclists with too much training aren't really the problem out there.

http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?pagename=RiderCourse%20Info
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:29 PM   #317
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Lots of good advice here.
The Rider classes might not be mandatory, but they are an extremely good idea nonetheless. Even if you've done one before, but you've been away for a few years, it's worth doing again. It's amazing how much you forget. Motorcyclists with too much training aren't really the problem out there.

http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?pagename=RiderCourse%20Info
We actually have those classes. They have a beginner's course and an advanced riders refresher course. I do plan on taking it before I get the motorcycle endorsement, registration, and insurance on it. Probably next spring.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:11 AM   #318
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I'm in Virginia and have never done either of those. I guess I'll add them to my list.
Hwy 311 goes out to the Swinging Bridge. A suspended bridge and restaurant. We may try to go there for Thanksgiving Dinner. They are serving.
http://www.virginia.org/Listings/Dining/TheSwingingBridgeRestaurant/

My son has been riding for about 10 years and I learned they used to go up on the Blue Ridge Parkway at night with a switch for their tail light so they could ditch the cops. They would ride, race, get chased and disappear into the woods (tree line is about 20' from the road) - switch off their lights and watch cops go right by.

They had Wheelie Contests on the top of Bent Mountain right in front of the Firestation.

They are crazy.
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:43 PM   #319
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I've seen their obstacle course too. Those guys rely are amazing.
Those motor officers really go through the training and it shows,I always enjoy watching slow speed practice/competition.

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JW That's an awesome video! IMHO Slow speed is where the skill level shows in riders.

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Lots of good advice here.
The Rider classes might not be mandatory, but they are an extremely good idea nonetheless. Even if you've done one before, but you've been away for a few years, it's worth doing again. It's amazing how much you forget. Motorcyclists with too much training aren't really the problem out there.

http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?pagename=RiderCourse%20Info
Thanks Overkill
I totally agree,the problem isn't a well trained motorcycle rider. It's the inattentive drivers that are busy on their cell phones with texting and conversation,the safety courses help us survive on the roads with these drivers.
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:48 PM   #320
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Those motor officers really go through the training and it shows,I always enjoy watching slow speed practice/competition.
That and the fact that some of them spend more time on two wheels than some people spend AWAKE at one time.

Had to help a West Monroe officer pick up his bike when he dropped it in the middle of the Christmas parade last year. I think he was a regular patrol car officer who was just riding a bike for the parade.

Dude actually asked me, "you think anyone saw that?" And he was dead serious.
I just stopped mid lift and stared at him. I didn't know how to respond.
"My bad, that was a dumb question."
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