Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   The Club House (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/)
-   -   Military specialisms (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/military-specialisms-32953/)

Daniel_H 10-12-2010 04:50 PM

Military specialisms
 
Someone mentioned something in another thread that sparked my interest.

In the military, you can choose your speciality. Does that include most things?

I did give a passing thought to a military career, but am not at all sure. t's an interesting idea. I'm planning to major in accounting. Opportunities there?

Not sure my folks would like the idea of me being in the military, though. Not these days.

CA357 10-12-2010 04:59 PM

You can choose pretty much any field you want if you have qualified by testing and there are openings. But, if there are no vacancies or is no need, you will go where Uncle Sam needs you most.

Daniel_H 10-12-2010 05:01 PM

Thanks. This is just at an ideas stage really. I'm always open to ideas.

My interest in guns is not in question (especially Desert Eagles!) but that's not the same as being ready for the military. That needs a lot of thought.

CA357 10-12-2010 05:16 PM

BTW, two things, it's "specialty" or "specialties" and nice haircut. ;)

Daniel_H 10-12-2010 05:24 PM

Oh Ok! Thanks.

But it's true, isn't it? You can't go into something like that without a lot of careful thought.

CA357 10-12-2010 05:36 PM

I enlisted with my parents permission when I was seventeen. I went in the fall after HS graduation. I grew up there. I will tell you with all honesty that it is not for everyone. It can be tough.

If you're thinking about it, think hard, it may be the most serious commitment you'll ever make. It is not a decision to be undertaken lightly or on a whim. You may literally be putting your life on the line.

Overkill0084 10-12-2010 05:42 PM

Take the ASVAB test. That will tell you where you fall in aptitude/qualification for various carreer fields.
I recommend you have a word with a recruiter. They can explain the nuts & bolts aspects pretty well. That being said, you can pretty much assume that any info will be presented in the best possible light. I can honestly say that my recruiter never actually lied, but there were a number of facts that I could have used. I ended up doing 21.5 years in the USAF, so it wasn't all that big of a deal.
Don't forget the Guard/Reserve either. I know the Army guard here in UT had ton of educational incentives a few years ago. I know one guy who had his entire student loan inventory paid off by joining the UT Guard. The UT Air Guard has been spending a fair bit of money on advertising as well, geared toward, you guessed it, educational opportunities.

c3shooter 10-12-2010 06:36 PM

Ref: Accounting- all branches of the military have someone that does accounting. It may be in budgeting, it may be in finance. (It is nice to get paid sometimes). DO talk with a recruiter. Despite all the jokes, if a recruiter gives it to you in writing, it is an enforceable contract. You must meet all the requirements for the position, AND complete required training- AND there must be a need for what you want to do. You should also consider talking to someone familiar with the ROTC program. Basically, while going to college, you take some military classes, do some active duty training during summers, when you graduate you are a junior officer. And frankly, being a 2LT in the Finance Corps beats the daylights out of being a PFC Finance clerk. Take that from someone that has been a PFC and a 2 LT.

Troy Michalik 10-12-2010 06:57 PM

Daniel, you seem like a pretty smart kid, so I'm probably telling you something that you've already thought of. But whatever branch you join, take advantage of all they have to offer. Learn something that will serve you well when you get back out into the civilian world. I got a kid renting my house right now that just finished his commitment with the Marine Corps. I knew him when he was in high school with my son. He went in all hoorah and wanted to be a grunt, he was the squad machine gunner and did tours in both sand boxes. Only now he's out, and he's got jack to show for it. And the last time I talked to him, he was thinking of going back in because there is nothing for him out here.

So take everything they offer that will get you further.

BTW, does your high school have an JROTC program?

NGIB 10-12-2010 07:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 367204)
Ref: Accounting- all branches of the military have someone that does accounting. It may be in budgeting, it may be in finance. (It is nice to get paid sometimes). DO talk with a recruiter. Despite all the jokes, if a recruiter gives it to you in writing, it is an enforceable contract. You must meet all the requirements for the position, AND complete required training- AND there must be a need for what you want to do. You should also consider talking to someone familiar with the ROTC program. Basically, while going to college, you take some military classes, do some active duty training during summers, when you graduate you are a junior officer. And frankly, being a 2LT in the Finance Corps beats the daylights out of being a PFC Finance clerk. Take that from someone that has been a PFC and a 2 LT.

As always, c3 is spot on. I work for the Army as an accountant (civil service) and most of these highly technical jobs are civilian for stability. The Army has a Finance Corps but they focus mainly on payroll & disbursing. As others have said, if you choose this route, select a specialty that has openings in the private sector. While being an "operator" is rewarding, there aren't a lot of jobs on the outside for someone who's resume is limited to killing bad guys 722 different ways with common household items...


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:23 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.