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Old 02-26-2009, 09:14 AM   #31
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Bruce Lee incorporated Wing Chung into his Jeet Kune Do, along with western boxing and fencing... if anyone cares

Actually,if I may, Bruce Lee studied Wing Chun under Yip Man for four years before starting his own art, Jeet Kune Do. Bruce Lee was made into soooo much more than he was in my opinion.

TKD- 3yrs

Goju - 18yrs and still running


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Old 02-26-2009, 10:24 PM   #32
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Actually,if I may, Bruce Lee studied Wing Chun under Yip Man for four years before starting his own art, Jeet Kune Do. Bruce Lee was made into soooo much more than he was in my opinion.

TKD- 3yrs

Goju - 18yrs and still running
Yes it's true he studied under Yip Man, but he also trained with THE best in just about every martial arts and hand to hand combat. It was he who decided what components of each art were the most efficient and effective, and it was he who combined certain aspects of fencing and boxing. The problem, IMO is that Hollywood "watered down" the actual art of JKD. It's one thing to see him on screen screaming and doing flying kicks, but it's another to study the fundamentals from one of the few people that are certified by Jerry Poteet(one of Bruce's early students). Flying kicks and other moves aren't utilized because you : 1. Are telegraphing your move, and 2) it's a waste of movement and energy. The problem with today's JKD is that every shmuck who studied under someone who knew a guy who was taught by someone who knew Bruce Lee opens up a studio and calls himself a Jeet Kune Do instructor.


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Old 02-27-2009, 12:15 AM   #33
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Jeet kune do was supposed to be a training philosophy, not a style. Lee wanted people to experiment, study, and fight to develop the techniques that worked for them as an individual. It was never about ranks, schools, or anything else.

SO much of what people call jeet kune do nowadays is watered down wing chun flavored with kali. Just add some fencing footwork and serve with a dash of bad judo.

Turning JKD into a "style" is the last thing Bruce would have wanted.

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Old 02-27-2009, 12:45 AM   #34
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Judo for ten years.

Boxing (AAU) 4 years.

American Jujitsu (MMA) for 3 years.

Weightlifting for 15 years. (If you don't think weightlifting is a form of combat preparation, you're nuts!)

I actually got into firearms because I felt it was a natural progression for self-defense. No matter how far my physical skills advanced, it would always be trumped by a gun.

Besides, training all those years has left me with some pervasive injuries. Shooting is less damaging to my body! (Not counting my .454; that thing is brutal!)
On the weightlifting thing.... I watched a college recruiting film last night where a high school football standout was bragging about squatting 300 lbs. I went 502 at age 17 clean (A term which USED to mean "meeting all parameters of a legal lift" as opposed to "Steroid free".) and quite frankly couldn't understand why an athlete would consider 300# a squat worth mentioning.
At my age, I don't use 150# dumbells anymore, but I don't see a lot of emphasis being put on kids to push themselves these days. Sure, the genetically-blessed ones work with big stacks, but it seems like the only scrawny kids that get anywhere are juicing.
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Old 02-27-2009, 03:01 AM   #35
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Yes it's true he studied under Yip Man, but he also trained with THE best in just about every martial arts and hand to hand combat.
Yes, briefly and not nearly enough to get a good base in any of them.

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It was he who decided what components of each art were the most efficient and effective, and it was he who combined certain aspects of fencing and boxing.
And I still wonder why he thought he was the authority on any art's effectiveness. He went on about karate being linear and static, but he had very little experience or understanding of karate.

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The problem, IMO is that Hollywood "watered down" the actual art of JKD. It's one thing to see him on screen screaming and doing flying kicks, but it's another to study the fundamentals from one of the few people that are certified by Jerry Poteet(one of Bruce's early students). Flying kicks and other moves aren't utilized because you : 1. Are telegraphing your move, and 2) it's a waste of movement and energy. The problem with today's JKD is that every shmuck who studied under someone who knew a guy who was taught by someone who knew Bruce Lee opens up a studio and calls himself a Jeet Kune Do instructor.
Very true, but JKD is not the be all end all of martial arts. It is the beginning of mma though.
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Old 02-27-2009, 03:04 AM   #36
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Jeet kune do was supposed to be a training philosophy, not a style. Lee wanted people to experiment, study, and fight to develop the techniques that worked for them as an individual. It was never about ranks, schools, or anything else.

SO much of what people call jeet kune do nowadays is watered down wing chun flavored with kali. Just add some fencing footwork and serve with a dash of bad judo.

Turning JKD into a "style" is the last thing Bruce would have wanted.
I agree.

The only problem I have with this is that's it's no different from any other arts. They have basic principles, but you learn those principles to find the best use for your bodies movements. Everyone has a bag of tricks and each person's is different despite what they trained in.
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Old 02-27-2009, 04:45 PM   #37
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I agree.

The only problem I have with this is that's it's no different from any other arts. They have basic principles, but you learn those principles to find the best use for your bodies movements. Everyone has a bag of tricks and each person's is different despite what they trained in.
I agree completely. Bruce was a great athlete, but his contribution to the martial art was in exposure, not necessarily innovation.

He understood things like conditioning and aliveness (testing techniques at full speed against a resisting opponent), and how important they were to effective fighting. But MANY martial artists of the time were already doing it. Kyokushin and judo are classic examples. Muay thai has been practiced this way since the dawn of time; as well as wrestling, and boxing.

But Carl Gotch, Mas Oyama, Masahiko Kimura, and such were not on TV every week kicking ass in front of everyone. Bruce was. So he gets all the credit.
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Old 02-27-2009, 05:47 PM   #38
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Default Martial Arts Training-

Yeah-

As a young teen- started with Shorin-Ryu Karate
Late Teens- Shaolin 5 Animal Kung Fu, Yang Style Tai Chi
Military- Choy Lay Fut, Jeet Kune Do, Praying Mantis, Small Circle Ju-Jitsu,
and some (very limited) Aikido.
Mid-Late Twenties- Pa K'ua Chang, Hsing-I Ch'uan
Older and Know Better- Continued with Pa Kua, Hsing-I, and Chen P'an Ling Tai Chi Chuan (still training to this day...)

John



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