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Old 03-09-2014, 04:22 PM   #21
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My fingers have little scars all over from cuts, scrapes and smashes. Summer of 1976 I was helping Dad hook up the disc harrow to his 8N Ford, and the last joint of my little finger got smashed between the hitch and the harrow. Looked like a popped grape. Doc put 17 stitches in it, and finished taking the nail off, but it healed ok. Before that, I was at deer camp, and popped the top off a can of Vienna sausages (yeah, back then I'd eat anything), only the edge of the lid put a nasty cut in another finger. I think I sterilized it with some Jim Beam.

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Old 03-09-2014, 04:29 PM   #22
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Before that, I was at deer camp, and popped the top off a can of Vienna sausages (yeah, back then I'd eat anything), only the edge of the lid put a nasty cut in another finger. I think I sterilized it with some Jim Beam.
“Back then” nothing – I thought that was still a staple item? Jim Beam – cheap stuff that will give you a headache…if you are gonna do it, do Crown Royal Black.
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Old 03-09-2014, 04:44 PM   #23
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How to treat a laceration heh ? The same way you want laceration to treat you .! I knowled , I dated her sister Clowene .!



PS: That peeled finger , that was nasty , Oooouch .!

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Old 03-09-2014, 04:48 PM   #24
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If its greater than 10 hours, it shouldn't be closed (stitched or glued).

It sounds like the proper immediate first aid was conducted. Other things to check when you " see white" are function, such as range of motion in both flexion and extension, nerve checks to see if feeling is in tact and the same as the other unaffected fingers. Then check circulation by compressing the tip of the finger until the nail bed blanches white. Release tension and ensure that blood returns to the nail bed about as fast as the other nail beds.

Finger joints are pretty thin. The white you saw may have been connective tissue that allows muscle to glide, or the tendon sheath that allows the tendon to glide inside, kind of like a bicycle brake cable in it's tubing conduit.

If everything is intact early in a laceration, it can be sanitized with iodine and alcohol. (Hydrogen peroxide can slow healing by disrupting healthy cells). Flexing areas like that crease are hard to keep closed and are probably best left open, but covered and allowed to heal from the bottom of the cut outward to the surface. On non flexing areas, if multiple layers don't require closure, super glue works well. Cleaning the wound well before closure is absolutely key though. Dermabond, used in medical facilities is essentially superglue with an applicator, and cost about $65, as opposed to getting 4 tubes of super glue from a dollar store for less than $5.

If a wound is open greater than 6 hours it is questionable if closing it would be riskier than leaving it open, due to risk of enclosing bacteria or contaminants. Puncture wounds like nail punctures or dog bites need to be left open.

When doctors are available they should be utilized, but in remote locations the above advice can be given consideration.

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Old 03-09-2014, 05:07 PM   #25
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Last spring I was cutting some small branches with an electric chainsaw. No gloves either. Well figured since it was a small saw I could handle it with one hand and hold the branches with the other. See where this is going? Well the saw bucked and came down just in front of the knuckles of the index and middle fingers. Surprisingly no tendons or nerves were severed. Held my fingers out straight and no bleeding. Gauze and some cardboard to keep the fingers straight and it healed up nicely. Very lucky for me, should have seen the doctor.

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Old 03-09-2014, 05:24 PM   #26
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I get cuts like this a lot in the creases of my fingers. From work, knives, fishing line (YIKES!!!). I usually do the same procedure. Stop bleeding, wash, stop bleeding again, sterilize, neosporin, bandage. Unfortunately due to having to extensively use my hands all day long for work they sometimes take longer to heal when they are in the creases. Whenever I get the chance I always take off the bandage, clean most all of the neosporin off and let it air out. Seems to help it heal much much faster for me. Most bandages suck for lacerations on your fingers and esp the creases. the one thing that I HIGHLY recommend would be these pictured below just be sure to clean the skin really good that the bandage will be touching, maybe alcohol to remove oils, and make sure it is bone dry before applying. They stick better than anything, keep it dry, contain anti-biotics, and reduce pain. Also is not like a "wet" type of anti-biotic so the flesh does not stay mushy and easy to break open. These are my life savers. Couldn't live my life without them.

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Old 03-09-2014, 05:36 PM   #27
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I concede....

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Old 03-09-2014, 07:24 PM   #28
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Dang! You’re good; I’d have never thought that “The fact that you saw it means it likely isn't severed”. And you can tell from a finger that this is but a youth…I am impressed.
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We know the OP to be in high school.
Yep. Beastie boy has been around for a bit.

As far as stopping bleeding on small cuts like this, I don't do it right away. I hold it over the sink and let it flow for a while. What better way to wash out a cut, than from the inside out, and with the body's own natural hydraulic fluid?

Obviously, on a larger cut, especially one where there's a chance of bleeding out, my first priority is to stop the bleeding. If it's bleeding that hard anyway, then likely all the "natural washing" has been done that I'm comfortable allowing to begin with.
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Old 03-09-2014, 09:34 PM   #29
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“Back then” nothing – I thought that was still a staple item? Jim Beam – cheap stuff that will give you a headache…if you are gonna do it, do Crown Royal Black.
Um, no. If I were lost in the wilderness and Vienna wieners were all there was to eat, I *might* be able to choke some down now, but not willingly. Same with potted meat and bologna. And canned chili.

The Jim Beam? I poured it on the cut, I didn't drink back in my teens. Really! I was a Junior at Univ of Georgia before I started drinking. Took several six-packs of Budweiser before I could stand the taste of beer, but I persevered.
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"Then tell me this: Why would you want to hang around people that get uncomfortable, or even scared, about that kind of thing?" "Maybe to feel normal," I said. He laughed. "Normal's not all it's cracked up to be." "You think?" "Hell, I know." - from Spirits In The Wires, by Charles de Lint.

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Old 03-09-2014, 09:38 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by trip286 View Post
Yep. Beastie boy has been around for a bit.

As far as stopping bleeding on small cuts like this, I don't do it right away. I hold it over the sink and let it flow for a while. What better way to wash out a cut, than from the inside out, and with the body's own natural hydraulic fluid?

Obviously, on a larger cut, especially one where there's a chance of bleeding out, my first priority is to stop the bleeding. If it's bleeding that hard anyway, then likely all the "natural washing" has been done that I'm comfortable allowing to begin with.
This is true, let the initial blood flow flush the germs back out. When I get cuts, scratches etc from the critters here (some of these damn roosters love to flog me) I let the blood flow, then douse the wound with Betadine. I have no desire for another hospitalization for cellulitis infections, BTDT twice, and that's more than enough!
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"Well, we're all victims of our own gene pool. Someone must have peed in yours." - Walter Bishop, from Fringe.

"Then tell me this: Why would you want to hang around people that get uncomfortable, or even scared, about that kind of thing?" "Maybe to feel normal," I said. He laughed. "Normal's not all it's cracked up to be." "You think?" "Hell, I know." - from Spirits In The Wires, by Charles de Lint.

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