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How to make a REAL cajun jambalaya


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Old 01-13-2014, 01:47 PM   #71
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Now this is a real Food Fight.
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Old 01-13-2014, 02:17 PM   #72
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Jambalaya originated in southeast Louisiana. Spanish and French food cultures are responsible for the creation of jambalaya. Jambalaya is traditionally made in three parts, with meat and vegetables, and is completed by adding stock and rice. It is the Louisiana evolution of the saffron colored paella found in Spanish cuisine.

It says nothing about Cajun or Creole. But by your logic and the wording of the page you posted jambalaya is a creole dish no matter how you cook it.

When I ran Carencro we had a full service kitchen. We served what was in season other than roast beef po boys. We had roast beef po boys all the time. I had real Cajun cooks working in the kitchen. Anything less would not sell. People would have just brought their own food.

seancslaughter, I was raised in Acadiana myself. Why do you think I knew about Acadiana and the migration of the French from Canada. Mr Cajun authority didn't even know there was a region of LA called Acadiana. He probably doesn't know about the river parishes or the river rats. He is just running off at the mouth. If he wants to split hairs about things that don't even exist that is fine with me.

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Old 01-13-2014, 02:47 PM   #73
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Now this is a real Food Fight.
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:47 PM   #74
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This is over the top. Witt made sense for the most part. I wonder what he would say about tomatos and red jambalaya/red gumbo. Bet HE knows the difference between New Orleans style or creole style and what the cajuns usually cook. Hey John buddy, click on the little tab in that wikipedia article that says varieties.

You really should read the whole article before you claim to know what's in it.



Since you wanna get smart:

http://foodreference.about.com/od/traditional_foods/a/What-Is-Jambalaya.htm

http://www.cookinglight.com/m/healthy-living/travel/jambalaya-history-00412000085030/

http://www.avenueinnbb.com/blog/2010/04/cajun-vs-creole-how-does-one-know-the-difference/

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1447822/

That's my first five google results.

ALL OF THEM MENTION RED JAMBALAYA AS CREOLE. All of them define the difference between creole and Cajun cooking the same. (mostly TOMATOS).

And I did know the mid-southern region of Louisiana was Acadiana. However I confused Acadiana with Acadia, the area near Quebec that the Acadians migrated from. Which is not really a topic of conversation outside of a state history class. I know plenty of coonasses who speak Cajun French but couldn't point to the Acadiana parishes on a map. This is old news and has nothing to do with the fact that creole jambalaya is red and cajun jambalaya is not.

Thank you. That is all.
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Old 01-13-2014, 11:14 PM   #75
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Default po folks..............

I remember as a youngster eating jambalya at my aunts house. It contained one can of tomato sauce and a half dozen very, very, veryyyyyyy thin sliced hot dogs of unknown origin..................They toasted bread on the heater in the winter time................You bathed in water drawn from a cistern and just enough to wet your, lol..........
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Old 01-13-2014, 11:47 PM   #76
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This is over the top. Witt made sense for the most part. I wonder what he would say about tomatos and red jambalaya/red gumbo. Bet HE knows the difference between New Orleans style or creole style and what the cajuns usually cook. Hey John buddy, click on the little tab in that wikipedia article that says varieties.

You really should read the whole article before you claim to know what's in it.



Since you wanna get smart:

http://foodreference.about.com/od/traditional_foods/a/What-Is-Jambalaya.htm

http://www.cookinglight.com/m/healthy-living/travel/jambalaya-history-00412000085030/

http://www.avenueinnbb.com/blog/2010/04/cajun-vs-creole-how-does-one-know-the-difference/

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1447822/

That's my first five google results.

ALL OF THEM MENTION RED JAMBALAYA AS CREOLE. All of them define the difference between creole and Cajun cooking the same. (mostly TOMATOS).

And I did know the mid-southern region of Louisiana was Acadiana. However I confused Acadiana with Acadia, the area near Quebec that the Acadians migrated from. Which is not really a topic of conversation outside of a state history class. I know plenty of coonasses who speak Cajun French but couldn't point to the Acadiana parishes on a map. This is old news and has nothing to do with the fact that creole jambalaya is red and cajun jambalaya is not.

Thank you. That is all.
from what i gather, the cooking styles of Creole and Cajun are similiar but different. Creole cooking is more likely to have been found originally in the larger cities an cajun cooking was more likely to have been found out in the woods and swamps.
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Old 01-14-2014, 02:33 AM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willshoum
I remember as a youngster eating jambalya at my aunts house. It contained one can of tomato sauce and a half dozen very, very, veryyyyyyy thin sliced hot dogs of unknown origin..................They toasted bread on the heater in the winter time................You bathed in water drawn from a cistern and just enough to wet your, lol..........
I remember eating red jambalaya with my Grannie as a kid.

...in New Orleans somewhere.

They had Gumbo with a tomato roux too. I thought it was weird. But good.
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:44 AM   #78
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Oh Yes I did !.............

Slow Cooker Jambalaya

Ingredients

1lb chicken breast halves cut into 1 inch cubes
1lb andoille sausage, sliced
1 cup uncooked long grain rice
1 28oz can diced tomatoes with juice
1 large onion, chopped
1 large green bell pepper, chopped
1 cup chopped celery
1 1/2 cup chicken broth
2 teaspoons dried oregano
2 teaspoons dried parsley
2 bay leaves
2 teaspoons Cajun or Creole seasoning
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2lb medium shrimp, shelled and deveined.

Directions

In a slow cooker, mix together all ingredients except for the shrimp.
Cover and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours, or 3 to 4 hours on high. 40 minutes before serving, stir in the shrimp. Continue to cook for the remaining 40 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through and the shrimp and has turned pink, then before serving remove bay leaves. Serve hot with slices of lime, and add Tabasco sauce if desired.
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Old 01-17-2014, 03:38 PM   #79
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OK so what do you think ?................Recipe given to me by my Aunt Judy.
easy_jambalaya.jpg  
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Last edited by 303tom; 01-17-2014 at 03:42 PM.
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