Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   The Club House (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/)
-   -   High-powered 12 yr-olds! OMG! (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/high-powered-12-yr-olds-omg-27818/)

zhuk 06-02-2010 08:50 AM

High-powered 12 yr-olds! OMG!
 
From the "Why won't someone think of the children!" files...


and oh look it's those (highly secretive, yet loudmouthed) resident nutjobs, The National Coalition for Gun Control leading the righteous charge:


Push to let primary school kids shoot each other with paintball guns

http://resources0.news.com.au/images...tball-kids.jpg


By Geoff Chambers The Daily Telegragph


June 02, 2010 12:00AM


PRIMARY school kids will be allowed to shoot at each in combat situations if politicians approve a police push to change the rules on paintballing.

The NSW Police Force wants the legal age for paintball games dropped from 16 to 12.

That means Year 6 students could handle high-powered weapons in skirmish scenarios.

Local paintball operators also have backed school leagues, in which students would compete against each other for points.

Police Minister Michael Daley said he was aware of the police submission, which is expected to be handed to him this month.

"I'll await formal advice from the NSW Police Force on this matter. I would be happy to consult with the industry pending that submission," he said. Any changes made to the Firearms Registry guidelines would require approval from Mr Daley.


The National Coalition for Gun Control raised concerns last night that lowering the legal age for paintball would set a bad precedent for firearms use.

"If you allow one [issue] to be reduced, there's no doubt that it will move on to other categories of firearms use," spokeswoman Samantha Lee said.


But after spending 10 years lobbying for change, Action Paintball Games owner Michael Whybrew has backed the proposed reform, saying the sport had been left behind in Australia due to government restrictions.

"My 13-year-old daughter has been badgering me since she was a little girl because she wants to get out there. You look at all of the kids who suffer from obesity and this would be the perfect remedy," Mr Whybrew said.

"I don't think it is unsafe for a 12-year-old to get involved with paintball. You'll get the same types of injuries playing footy or tripping over a tree stump.

"The safety policies are very strict," he said.


Paintball guns shoot spherical gelatin capsules containing dye and leave welts and bruises on the body. In the US, high schools and universities are involved in regular skirmish battles.


Mr Whybrew, who operates paintball centres at Rouse Hill and in Perth, regularly travels overseas to compete.

He returned from an international tournament in Malaysia on Monday.

"It was easier getting the paintball gun through their customs compared with bringing it back into Australia," he said.

The Firearms Registry's guidelines on paintball were last changed in 2006, when the legal age was reduced from 18 to 16.

Senior officers in the Firearms Registry have endorsed the proposed change because it would put the state on a par with Western Australia and the UK.

Emails obtained by The Daily Telegraph show those same officers have no major concerns with a reduction in the legal age if safety guidelines were followed.


In Tasmania, paintball games were permanently banned after the 1996 Port Arthur massacre, while both Queensland and South Australia have an age limit of 15. The ACT and Victoria impose an age limit of 18.

Push to let primary school kids shoot each other with paintball guns | Herald Sun


Surely this is a recipe for total anarchy, people! :eek:

spittinfire 06-02-2010 11:11 AM

Paintball guns are indeed highpowered rifles. So powerful in fact that NC doesn't allow them for ANY type of hunting. The idea of a 12 year old with one just scares me.

robocop10mm 06-02-2010 01:03 PM

You poor bastages in Australia...Your birth rate must be near ZERO as it appears nearly every testicle in the land has been removed.

Rick1967 06-02-2010 01:35 PM

What a joke!!! My son has been paintballing with my friends and I since he was 9 years old. He would have started earlier. But, I knew he couldn't handle being shot. Do keep in mind my kid is big. He is 11 years old. He is 5' 7". I am waiting for people to ask if he drives yet.

Duddn 06-02-2010 02:33 PM

I think its great to get kids out there playing paintball. I am a big paintballer, have been since I first saw the sport on TV in 1997. Paintball is a great sport in need of younger players to keep it alive. On another note, that orange shocker is pretty.

zhuk 06-03-2010 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spittinfire (Post 293641)
Paintball guns are indeed highpowered rifles. So powerful in fact that NC doesn't allow them for ANY type of hunting. The idea of a 12 year old with one just scares me.


Yes they may be high powered, but under close supervision at a registered and licensed paintball range (the only place *anyone* can legally play it in Aust) I can't see that much of a problem, spittin. They wouldn't just be popping at each other out in the bush somewhere. What I really object to is insinuations like these, that allowing those 12+ to play paintball would somehow cause irresponsible attitudes which would automatically transfer to the use of other firearms:

Quote:

lowering the legal age for paintball would set a bad precedent for firearms use.

"If you allow one [issue] to be reduced, there's no doubt that it will move on to other categories of firearms use,"

12 yrs old is the minimum age here for a firearms Minor's Permit, and that's not going to be lowered, ever.

saviorslegacy 06-03-2010 02:18 AM

Wait, I was told that guns were banned in Austalia. Is this not true?

zhuk 06-03-2010 02:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by saviorslegacy (Post 293967)
Wait, I was told that guns were banned in Austalia. Is this not true?

Heh I think this popular misconception is approaching true "urban myth" status now :p


(For the moment anyway) No! we still have our guns...well most of them lol


Quick rundown on the current laws for you:

Quote:

Firearms categories

Firearms in Australia are grouped into Categories with different levels of control. The categories are:

* Category A: Rimfire rifles (not semi-automatic), shotguns (not pump-action or semi-automatic), air rifles, and paintball markers.

* Category B: Centrefire rifles (not semi-automatic), muzzleloading firearms made after 1 January 1901.

* Category C: Semi-automatic rimfire rifles holding 10 or fewer rounds and pump-action or semi-automatic shotguns holding 5 or fewer rounds.
(Restricted: only primary producers, occupational shooters, collectors and some clay target shooters can own functional Category C firearms)

* Category D: Semi-automatic centrefire rifles, pump-action/semi-automatic shotguns holding more than 5 rounds
(functional Category D firearms are restricted to occupational shooters; collectors may own deactivated Category D firearms).

* Category H: Handguns including air pistols, deactivated handguns and guns less than 65 cm long. Target shooters are limited to handguns of .38 calibre or less.

(Participants in "approved" competitions may acquire handguns up to .45", currently Single Action Shooting and Metallic Silhouette. IPSC shooting is not "approved" for the larger calibres, for unstated reasons. Category H barrels must be at least 100 mm (3.94") long for revolvers, and 120 mm (4.72") for semi-automatic pistols, and magazines are restricted to 10 rounds. Handgun collectors are exempt from the laws stated above.)

* Category R/E: Restricted weapons: machine guns, rocket launchers, assault rifles, flame-throwers, anti-tank guns, Howitzers, artillery, etc.
(Collectors in some states only, weapons must be comprehensively deactivated. Deactivated firearms are still subject to the same storage and licensing requirements as 'live' firearms in many states.)


Antique firearms can in some states be legally bought without licences. In other states they are subject to the same requirements as modern firearms.

All single-shot muzzleloading firearms manufactured before 1 January 1901 are considered antique firearms. Four states require licences for antique percussion revolvers and cartridge repeating firearms but in Queensland and Victoria a person may possess such a firearm without a license, so long as the firearm is registered.

Australia also has tight restrictions on air pistols, airsoft guns, and replica firearms, including toys that look realistic. Suppressors (or 'silencers') are extremely restricted and generally not available to most shooters.

Gun politics in Australia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So...no chance of ever getting hands on the object of my enduring lust :rolleyes:

Rick1967 06-03-2010 02:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spittinfire (Post 293641)
Paintball guns are indeed highpowered rifles. So powerful in fact that NC doesn't allow them for ANY type of hunting. The idea of a 12 year old with one just scares me.

I trust my son with my .357 mag. I'm sure he is fine with his paintball gun. He doesn't shoot my high powered rifles. He's just not into that.

Jess 06-03-2010 02:48 AM

paintball-the gateway gun

perfect


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:54 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.