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Old 07-31-2013, 02:11 PM   #11
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its a 2000 last of the detroit gas 4cyl's.

hey rockratt, you be rich. you got a door on your barn! :>

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Old 07-31-2013, 05:54 PM   #12
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its a 2000 last of the detroit gas 4cyl's.

hey rockratt, you be rich. you got a door on your barn! :>
Woo boy!!! Not hardly. I just drive junk and needed some where to work on it!!! Ha to go set with my mom while my dad went to town. Will PM you later.
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Old 07-31-2013, 10:17 PM   #13
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Bobski, I'm looking forward to enjoying your land for a weekend. I love the country life.

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Old 08-01-2013, 01:19 AM   #14
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if you shoot well, i'll let you drive ole jim dandy! hes the little guy on the farm!



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Old 08-01-2013, 01:28 AM   #15
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if you shoot well, i'll let you drive ole jim dandy! hes the little guy on the farm!
Looks like it may have a wisconsin engine n it!

Ken
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Old 08-01-2013, 02:09 AM   #16
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I heard they were going to ban the round bales. Seems the cows can't get a square meal.

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Old 08-01-2013, 03:40 AM   #17
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Wrong color of orange.

We did not get a baler until the mid 80s when grandpa had some heart problems. Until then we hauled it in loose. About 2:00pm grandpa would start to rake the hay into windrows, my brother and I would ride our bikes over there and by 3:00pm we were using pitchforks to make piles of hay about 3' around and high. The grownups would show up about 4:30. Mom or Aunt Dorothy would drive the tractor pulling the wagon( the smallest tractor in the picture, it was the biggest one we had at the time.)the men would load the wagon using pitchforks, there is a system to this to "build a load". The younger kids would ride on the wagon tramping down the hay as it was loaded.

When the wagon was loaded we headed for the barn, the wagon was pulled part way into the barn and unhitched. The tractor was then brought outside and used to push the wagon the rest of the way into the barn.

The tractor was then hooked to the rope connected to the hay fork. The hay fork was jambed down into the hay on the wagon and the tractor would pull the rope, a series of pulleys would take the hay fork with about 10 or 15 percent of the hay up and over the hay mow when the guy on the wagon (usually my dad) would pull the trip rope and drop the hay into the mow. The older boys were in the mow and would spread the hay around. The tractor would back up, the hay fork would come back down and the whole process started over again 6 or 8 times for a load. Then back to the field for another load.

You knew you were considered responsible when you got to drive the tractor pulling the hay rope, because of the way it was set up if you screwed up you would do a huge amount of damage to the barn.

About dark we would go up to the house for a cookout that grandma and the other women had ready. We ate outside or in the garage. Looking back I think that was because by this time we smelled too bad to allowed into grandmas house. lol
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Old 08-01-2013, 04:00 PM   #18
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Wrong color of orange.

We did not get a baler until the mid 80s when grandpa had some heart problems. Until then we hauled it in loose. About 2:00pm grandpa would start to rake the hay into windrows, my brother and I would ride our bikes over there and by 3:00pm we were using pitchforks to make piles of hay about 3' around and high. The grownups would show up about 4:30. Mom or Aunt Dorothy would drive the tractor pulling the wagon( the smallest tractor in the picture, it was the biggest one we had at the time.)the men would load the wagon using pitchforks, there is a system to this to "build a load". The younger kids would ride on the wagon tramping down the hay as it was loaded.

When the wagon was loaded we headed for the barn, the wagon was pulled part way into the barn and unhitched. The tractor was then brought outside and used to push the wagon the rest of the way into the barn.

The tractor was then hooked to the rope connected to the hay fork. The hay fork was jambed down into the hay on the wagon and the tractor would pull the rope, a series of pulleys would take the hay fork with about 10 or 15 percent of the hay up and over the hay mow when the guy on the wagon (usually my dad) would pull the trip rope and drop the hay into the mow. The older boys were in the mow and would spread the hay around. The tractor would back up, the hay fork would come back down and the whole process started over again 6 or 8 times for a load. Then back to the field for another load.

You knew you were considered responsible when you got to drive the tractor pulling the hay rope, because of the way it was set up if you screwed up you would do a huge amount of damage to the barn.

About dark we would go up to the house for a cookout that grandma and the other women had ready. We ate outside or in the garage. Looking back I think that was because by this time we smelled too bad to allowed into grandmas house. lol
My grandpa decided he would put his up loose one year. I was glad too. No buck'n square bales on to the back of the truck. It was just me and him and it was all done with pitchforks. Thank god the following year he decided to go back to square bales and never do that again is all I can say.
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Old 08-01-2013, 04:27 PM   #19
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I have terrible hay fever, burn under the sun and was a senior in high school before I weighed 120 lbs at 6' tall. Built a lot of character putting up bales all summer to buy school clothes.

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Old 08-01-2013, 04:52 PM   #20
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I guess I'm just a city slicker. I've only stacked hay bales for about a month of my life. I was around 14, and my friend's grandparents had a farm in Quebec. We went up there and stacked bales of hay, shoveled sh*t, painted, and whatever other odd jobs were necessary. We also de-rocked a couple fields.

It was hard work, but I really enjoyed it.

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