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-   -   Having a pet lynx (bobcat) (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/having-pet-lynx-bobcat-88295/)

ZombieBrawler 04-06-2013 04:56 PM

Having a pet lynx (bobcat)
 
Anyone have one? Any species doesnt matter bobcat included. Been looking for one in las vegas NV for a bit now (yes its legal here). Any info/ experiences would be nice to hear, i have also looked up all the info i can online and other facts. Thank you.

HockaLouis 04-06-2013 05:04 PM

I had a cat that looked like a Bobcat -- little ear tufts and all. He was so pretty -- yes, pretty. But Bobcats themselves are wild animals and could kill you. Maybe a mean Maine Coon could too but luckily they are big, snow-designed, mushes who need room to play otherwise you shouldn't consider one of them either!

beaglesam 04-06-2013 05:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ZombieBrawler (Post 1205295)
Anyone have one? Any species doesnt matter bobcat included. Been looking for one in las vegas NV for a bit now (yes its legal here). Any info/ experiences would be nice to hear, i have also looked up all the info i can online and other facts. Thank you.

Let me get this right, you want this for a pet?

http://pictures-of-cats.org/wp-conte...cat-middle.jpg

Axxe55 04-06-2013 05:21 PM

wild animals by nature do not usually make good pets. even those gotten when real young usually at some point when they mature have a tendency to revert to wilder instincts. unless you are well versed in dealing with wild animals, not a good idea.

Steel_Talon 04-06-2013 05:38 PM

I grew up in a ranching family. I came into possession of a little baby Raccoon.... With "Clyde" at times it was a challenge with him and his opposable thumbs. And when he got to feeling his oats he developed a fondness for crotch sniffing. I wouldn't suggest a Raccoon for a pet. They are curious, destructive, and temperamental.

winds-of-change 04-06-2013 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by axxe55 (Post 1205317)
wild animals by nature do not usually make good pets. even those gotten when real young usually at some point when they mature have a tendency to revert to wilder instincts. unless you are well versed in dealing with wild animals, not a good idea.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steel_Talon (Post 1205325)
I grew up in a ranching family. I came into possession of a little baby Raccoon.... With "Clyde" at times it was a challenge with him and his opposable thumbs. And when he got to feeling his oats he developed a fondness for crotch sniffing. I wouldn't suggest a Raccoon for a pet. They are curious, destructive, and temperamental.

I have hand raised several raccoons and a couple squirrels. All were very fun and cute. But, as mentioned, they are wild animals. All.......everyone one of my 'babies'.......were allowed to be wild animals when they grew. Once they reach sexual maturity, nature kicks in and they aren't really interested in hanging with the humans. All of my 'babies' were allowed to come and go as they pleased. Eventually, they were gone more than they were here with me. I always left food out for them and have a special feeder that they need to lift the lid on to get at the food so my dogs don't eat the raccoon food.

Wild animals can make interesting pets but in the long run, they should be allowed to be what they are.........wild. I always look forward to getting a new wild animal to hand raise when I can but I know they eventually go their own way........as it should be.

Also, all animals I raise get wormed and a prophylactic injection of penicillin.

Here he is as a baby...

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r...psfbe27276.jpg

Here he is older and spending time outside......

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r...ps008c6986.jpg

Here he is one morning after he spent the night outside. He heard me letting the dogs out and wanted to see what was going on. He came out of the tree and ran to the back door for some scrambled eggs.

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r...ps55f433f0.jpg


Okay.......that all being said, it is very difficult to find a vet that will treat a wild animal. Almost impossible if you aren't a licensed wild life rehabber. Also, getting a bobcat neutered would be an absolute necessity for having it as a pet. I can't imagine the litter box situation. And if the animal becomes unmanageable, what would you do with it?

Cattledog 04-06-2013 06:48 PM

I sense ....yes! the prelude to another thrilling episode of Fatal Attractions!

I love that show

:P

winds-of-change 04-06-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cattledog (Post 1205400)
I sense ....yes! the prelude to another thrilling episode of Fatal Attractions!

I love that show

:P

How big is a Bobcat? Can they really kill a person? :eek:

Cattledog 04-06-2013 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by winds-of-change (Post 1205406)
How big is a Bobcat? Can they really kill a person? :eek:


having ones face eaten off may not necessarily be lethal, no.

Seriously, it's a wild cat. Domesticated cats are self centered jerks. Its just math. wild+cat= face eating .

That said, I fully endorse this decision on the grounds that 1) there is potential entertainment in the future for me and 2) laws prohibiting ownership of wild animals decreases mans respect for dangerous, face eating creatures.

To the OP: please be careful to not endanger your neighbors or their animals.

Axxe55 04-06-2013 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by winds-of-change (Post 1205406)
How big is a Bobcat? Can they really kill a person? :eek:

at the largest around 40 pounds and the average is a little over 20 pounds. possibly, but not likely.


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