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Old 12-21-2011, 08:07 PM   #11
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yeah, but the recoil would send you into the Sun.
Rocket packs.


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Old 12-22-2011, 09:46 AM   #12
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No splash down. The craft shown was created using guidelines for what was known as the "XPrize". The contest was to reward the creator of a civilian craft that could reach 100km(62mi) above sea level, return to a landing site, and be made ready for, and be launched again, within (I think) 24 hours. This is the reason why this is so revolutionary and ground breaking. When the "Age of Discovery" was going on, nations competed to try to map the world and therefor lay claim to the spice wealth of the world (spices were more valuable than gold at the time). This was a military endeavor. Then, private corporations sprung up to capitalize on these newly discovered spice producing locations. This was what drove the colonization and use of these areas. My question is this: Except for satellites and tourism, what is going to be the economic drive behind any company capitalizing on civilian access to space? What will be this era's "spice"? Right now it's like a European country in the 1300's developing transatlantic capabilities before knowing what was across the Atlantic.



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Old 12-22-2011, 05:03 PM   #13
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No splash down. The craft shown was created using guidelines for what was known as the "XPrize". The contest was to reward the creator of a civilian craft that could reach 100km(62mi) above sea level, return to a landing site, and be made ready for, and be launched again, within (I think) 24 hours. This is the reason why this is so revolutionary and ground breaking. When the "Age of Discovery" was going on, nations competed to try to map the world and therefor lay claim to the spice wealth of the world (spices were more valuable than gold at the time). This was a military endeavor. Then, private corporations sprung up to capitalize on these newly discovered spice producing locations. This was what drove the colonization and use of these areas. My question is this: Except for satellites and tourism, what is going to be the economic drive behind any company capitalizing on civilian access to space? What will be this era's "spice"? Right now it's like a European country in the 1300's developing transatlantic capabilities before knowing what was across the Atlantic.
The launch platform can be re-used as you state, but the rocket in the video does not appear to have the ability to re-enter the atmosphere and land on an airfield like the X-prize winner SpaceShipOne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I believe the "spice" in space is minerals. That and research.
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:11 PM   #14
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The launch platform can be re-used as you state, but the rocket in the video does not appear to have the ability to re-enter the atmosphere and land on an airfield like the X-prize winner SpaceShipOne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I believe the "spice" in space is minerals. That and research.
I would guess that the carrier will be multi-purpose and launch ballistic rockets such as the one in the video, and likely returnable craft like a larger and more capable Spaceship Two.
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Old 12-24-2011, 04:44 AM   #15
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I am guessing here but my guess is that it is not economically feasible to have a heavy-lift space vehicle that is like the Space Shuttle. The Space Shuttle had a hugely wasteful launch system. The Shuttle could return to Earth but the launch system was lacking. The SS was a victim of economics. That and the fact that the computer systems were not upgradable. They were literally flying the Space Shuttle on 40 year old computers (or maybe 30 year old). SpaceShipOne is designed to be a passenger vehicle that can return to Earth and redeploy within 24 hours and nothing more. It was not designed to place large payloads into space.

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Old 12-24-2011, 05:30 AM   #16
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Just think about shooting competitions in space! Virtually no gravity= no bullet drop. It would take a lot less skill to shoot a mile and hit your target.
Yeah, and you could probably hit deer at further distances too.


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