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sculker 03-13-2008 01:01 AM

Emergency Rooms in America: A Deadly Prognosis
 
:mad:

Emergency Rooms in America: A Deadly Prognosis
Wednesday, March 12, 2008

By Donald Snyder


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In a crowded Arizona emergency room, a 10-year old boy struggles to breathe. He is having an asthma attack.

Within 15 minutes, he is dead.

Had he not been turned away from two children’s hospitals closer to his home, he might be alive.

However, those ERs were too full to take the boy.

“The boy might be alive today if he was treated at one of the children’s hospitals instead of the ambulance being diverted to my crowded emergency department 20 to 30 minutes away,” said a doctor who formerly worked in that emergency department, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

The practice of diverting ambulances from overcrowded emergency rooms has become widespread — and the delay in treatment can have fatal consequences.

Consider these overwhelming statistics:

— One ambulance per minute is diverted — that’s 500,000 per year, according to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

— In 2000, Columbia University in New York City found that fatalities from heart attacks increased by as much as 47 percent as a result of diverting ambulances.

— In Houston, Texas, the average rate of diversion was 14 percent in 2001. Today, the rate is 40 percent, said Dr. Guy Clifton, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Texas in Houston.

— Americans are using emergency rooms more than ever in today’s society. In 2005, 115 million Americans went to the ER, up five million from the year before, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

— Between 1994 and 2004, there was a 20 percent increase in the demand for emergency care, according to the CDC, which is most likely due to an increase in the nations’ uninsured and growing elderly population.

During those years, 9 percent of the nation’s ERs closed, having lost money from inadequate reimbursement, according to the CDC.

— A recent Harvard study found the average waiting time for a patient to see a doctor in the ER jumped from 22 minutes in 1997 to 30 minutes in 2004. The same study showed patients with coronary episodes waited 8 minutes in 1997; in 2004, they waited 20 minutes.

— Of 1,000 doctors polled by the American College of Emergency Physicians last year, 200 said they knew of a patient who died because of failure to deliver prompt care in an overcrowded emergency department.

Combine these factors and the system is at a breaking point.

Dr. Brian F. Keaton, chairman of the board of directors of the ACEP, practices emergency medicine in Akron, Ohio. His story illustrates the situation faced by many doctors.

“I have people who come to my clinic with a headache caused by high blood pressure. I give them the medicine to bring the blood pressure down and a prescription,” Keaton said in an anguished tone.

“Many of them don’t have the money to fill it. I have no place in the system to care for them until they end up back here with a stroke because they weren’t taking their medication.”

Bellevue Hospital Center, the nation’s oldest public hospital, treats many of New York City’s disenfranchised residents. Few of these patients can afford private doctors.

One night last February, a doctor moved effortlessly from one cubicle to another inside Bellevue’s emergency department; her voice rising above the din of frenzied activity.

“He lives paycheck to paycheck and sometimes runs out of his heart medication and gets sick,” the doctor said about a distinguished-looking, white-haired man who sat on a bed, seemingly unfazed by the noise around him.

The doctor moved on to another bed, where a sleeping man was covered by blankets to warm his cold body. She recorded his temperature and added two more blankets. He was found sleeping in a doorway in the bitter cold.

This is a snapshot of an American emergency system in meltdown.

“Today we have a crisis that we cannot continue to survive in,” said Dr. Linda Lawrence, president of the ACEP. “We often don’t have beds for emergency patients. We don’t have enough heart monitors to go around. The nursing staff is badly stretched. We’re at a breaking point.”

One cause of emergency department gridlock is the practice known as “boarding.”

Admitted patients are left in the emergency department for extended stays until hospital beds become available — and patient care suffers.

“Studies show that patients are not receiving antibiotics on time when they have serious infections and that patients are not receiving adequate pain control,” Lawrence said.

Robert Roth, a New York resident, wrote a letter to the New York Times about his mother’s boarding experience at an emergency room.

“My mother, who is 89, recently had two extremely traumatic experiences in the emergency room,” he wrote. “One time she waited over 36 hours, the other time over 20 hours before they found a room for her. Both times she emotionally came apart and her condition dramatically deteriorated.”

One possible solution is to create more public clinics for preventive care, which would reduce the use of emergency departments for routine visits.

Bellevue has a large outpatient clinic, which treats 500,000 to 600,000 patients a year, said Dr. Lewis Goldfrank, chairman of emergency medicine at the hospital.

“Every patient who comes to the emergency department is a failure of the public health system,” Goldfrank said. “Many of the patients have chronic diseases that are monitored and treated at the outpatient clinic.”

The American College of Emergency Physicians supports Congressional passage of the Access to the Emergency Medical Services Act. This bill would recognize the need for more money to sustain an ailing system that must provide care to everyone, including those who can’t pay by creating a national bipartisan commission to examine the delivery of care in the nation’s emergency departments.

The act also calls on the government to collect data on the widespread practice of boarding so that new guidelines can be applied. A vote on the bill is expected by April.

“The system is sick and in danger of breaking,” Keaton said. “When it fails, it will be a catastrophic failure.”


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,337295,00.html

Righteous 03-13-2008 01:51 AM

well ...hmmmmmmmmm.... let me see.... speaking of somebody that uses the ER alot nowdays and not cause I want to but because I have Congestive heart failure I've seen the good and bad of it, I seen alot of people wait beacuse they be just sick...flu...etc. But people like me soon as they see I have CHF theres no waiting, I am took back ASAP, they tend to take the life threating people first and if you got the flu I would expect to wait. I was not turned down once but left under pain for a gall bladder that erupted once all because the guards said I cant leave my truck parked in the ER lane and wanted me to go park it pain or no pain, I left and drove 30 min to another hospital where i dam near drove thru the door and the guard didnt say a word and parked my truck for me later. Think the problem lies where to many people go to the ER for something they dont need and just need to stay at home.

allmons 03-13-2008 02:09 AM

You are so right, Mr Righteous!
 
ER's are designed for the worst human problems, but we are just overwhelmed by the sheer volume of people who come to the ER for minor, clinic level problems.

Hell, I can't believe people with the regular flu and colds go the ER for ANY reason. We have never been able to cure a viral infection and we still can't! All these people do is SPREAD the flippin' flu to the hundreds of people who are in the waiting area.

If they are dehydrated or can't control a fever ( by the way, if a fever isn't over 101.5, we don't usually treat it - it helps the body chase out the virus! ) or there is any respiratory difficulty, then the ED is the place for you (after hours). See your doctor or clinic in the daytime, however, to keep some pressure off the ER's.

Lastly, be aware that ER's see many patients that you don't know about. My ER gets all the county DOA's to process and place in the morgue. Our living patients rarely know these bodies are even there. Every ER has multiple entrances, and there is no way the public can know who all comes in for treatment. Then there are the multitude of poor and illegals who use ER's for ALL of their healthcare ( including child birth! ).

Righteous, ER's were built and designed for people who have serious problems, like yourself. You should be seen first. Hope your condition improves, my friend. And for goodness' sakes, take your medicines as prescribed!

;)

MarkoPo 03-13-2008 03:24 AM

As a registered nurse I can attest to this problem. Like mentioned above ER overcrowding is partly due to non-critical cases being seen by ER docs. I don't want ot de-rail this thread but I see the biggest problem coming from people with Medicaid or no insurance. They use the ER because it is free and an office visit would cost them $25.00. This is one reason I am against socialized medicine. A hospital has to see a patient no matte their ability to pay. Doctors on the other hand can turn patients away from their office if they owe money. The hospital I work at made it a policy to ask for the co-pay if any before being seen. This had reduced the load of or ER slightly.

nancy97056 03-13-2008 05:40 AM

Winchester 20 gauge
 
I'm brand new to this web site. I just inherited a Winchester 20 gauge double barrel shotgun. It is Model 24, Serial #26391. How do I find ou the history of this gun, and how can I value it for insurance purposes? HELP!

hillbilly68 03-13-2008 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Righteous (Post 18952)
... .Think the problem lies where to many people go to the ER for something they dont need and just need to stay at home.

Again, no one is willing to take responsibility or consider the second and third order effects of their self centered behavior. ERs are for emergencies like the man said. Think its bad now, wait until "universal" health scam is implemented. Better get that MD you have been putting off for so long.

Boris 03-13-2008 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkoPo (Post 18959)
As a registered nurse I can attest to this problem. Like mentioned above ER overcrowding is partly due to non-critical cases being seen by ER docs. I don't want ot de-rail this thread but I see the biggest problem coming from people with Medicaid or no insurance. They use the ER because it is free and an office visit would cost them $25.00. This is one reason I am against socialized medicine. A hospital has to see a patient no matte their ability to pay. Doctors on the other hand can turn patients away from their office if they owe money. The hospital I work at made it a policy to ask for the co-pay if any before being seen. This had reduced the load of or ER slightly.


There is to be expected to be some delay at ER notwithstanding, by virtue of the triage etc., I do not understand your arguement against socialized medicine, I have called medical services in the US a couple of times and I spent more time explaining how the bill was going to be paid before being treated! I was stiched up with a knife wound in my side in Nairobi one year and it was free......... I attended an ER in Anson, Texas with an infection in my gum, doctor looked at it (approximately 2 minutes 30 seconds), the bill was $123......14 tablets at $94, give me national health care anytime.....

hillbilly68 03-13-2008 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boris (Post 18984)
... I do not understand your arguement against socialized medicine, ...

Thought it would be clear, I guess further background is necessary. I and our friend from above Mark appear to be capitalists, not s*******ts. Think the system is overcrowded and underfunded now? Just consider the "free" medical care if it comes. Yes there are flaws in the system, I agree. But it is the best care money can buy. How many doctors are going to dig themselves into debt to become hostage to a national system? The medical community is operating at a shortage as it is, it would only become worse. We have successfully bankrupted S.Security for our offspring, how long would it take to bankrupt a national healthcare system? Who pays? We do. Another step toward destroying the middle class. Not to get off the subject of the original thread, but it is relevant to the point. SEN Davy Crockett once delivered an excellent speech on the temptation of the leadership to tap into the national treasury to provide assistance. The speech is titled "Not Ours to Give". No Sir, anything "socialized" can go elsewhere.

Boris 03-13-2008 03:45 PM

I would hold your judgement until you experience it. You already paid as much in taxes as we do, the problem is you have no idea where yours is spent! We I lived over there, although for only a short time I was amazed at the double taxation, and no one I ever asked knew where it went. Most of the country roads where dirt, and in the town I lived in there where only four paved roads.

I am a conservative, but as I have said in the past there is not a conservative politician anywhere over here that would even consider attacking the national health system. He simply wouldn't get elected, the care is some of the best in the world, and we are rightly proud that care is free to all at the point of need.

Samhain 03-13-2008 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hillbilly68 (Post 18997)
Thought it would be clear, I guess further background is necessary. I and our friend from above Mark appear to be capitalists, not s*******ts. Think the system is overcrowded and underfunded now? Just consider the "free" medical care if it comes. Yes there are flaws in the system, I agree. But it is the best care money can buy. How many doctors are going to dig themselves into debt to become hostage to a national system? The medical community is operating at a shortage as it is, it would only become worse. We have successfully bankrupted S.Security for our offspring, how long would it take to bankrupt a national healthcare system? Who pays? We do. Another step toward destroying the middle class. Not to get off the subject of the original thread, but it is relevant to the point. SEN Davy Crockett once delivered an excellent speech on the temptation of the leadership to tap into the national treasury to provide assistance. The speech is titled "Not Ours to Give". No Sir, anything "socialized" can go elsewhere.

Davy Crockett speech

http://www.pointsouth.com/csanet/greatmen/crockett/crocket2.htm


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