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-   -   drop of a bullet vertically vs. horizontally (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/drop-bullet-vertically-vs-horizontally-3027/)

thepit56 01-16-2008 11:41 PM

drop of a bullet vertically vs. horizontally
 
My physics teacher told us that if you drop a bullet and fire a bullet horizontally that they will fall at the same rate and hit the ground at the same time. somehow I don't believe this. if this is true how can a bullet travel hundreds of yards? can anyone explain this to me.

Righteous 01-17-2008 12:44 AM

I dont believe it either but how hell ya gonna prove it

Tanker60A3 01-17-2008 01:05 AM

Gravity
 
Gravity is pulling both bullets down at the same rate (assuming both bullets are the same). Both bullets should hit the ground at the same time, if the ground is level, and if the fired bullet was fired parallel to the ground. The difference in impact points is due to the explosive energy from the gun powder driving the fired bullet forward as it falls.

deadin 01-17-2008 01:15 AM

A bullet begins to fall the instant it leaves the muzzle. That's why the line of bore is higher than the line of sight. Where they cross is what the gun is sighted in for. However there are other things to consider. The main one is barrel rise due to recoil (especially in a handgun). But these are interior ballistics that effect things before the bullet exits the bore. Once its out, gravity takes over and is boss.

cpttango30 01-17-2008 02:00 AM

If both bullets are exactly the same. Say a .224" 50gr Hornady V-max. If you shoot a bullet and drop it at the same time yes they will hit the ground at the same time. Gravity is a constant and never changes on earth.

MarkoPo 01-17-2008 03:35 AM

This would only prove true in a vacuum. Same as droping a lead weight and a feather. In a vacuum both will hit bottom at the same time.

Flint Rock 01-18-2008 02:10 AM

Gravity
 
I can't think of any bearing that a vacuum would have on the rate of fall, unless by vacuum you just mean a lack unequal external forces acting on the bullets. Gravity is the determining factor here.

jeepejeep 01-18-2008 02:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkoPo (Post 14367)
This would only prove true in a vacuum. Same as droping a lead weight and a feather. In a vacuum both will hit bottom at the same time.

Doesn't need to be a vacuum. Gravity pulls the same no matter what just as others have said here.

jeepejeep 01-18-2008 02:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deadin (Post 14347)
A bullet begins to fall the instant it leaves the muzzle. That's why the line of bore is higher than the line of sight. Where they cross is what the gun is sighted in for. However there are other things to consider. The main one is barrel rise due to recoil (especially in a handgun). But these are interior ballistics that effect things before the bullet exits the bore. Once its out, gravity takes over and is boss.

Correct except line of bore is BELOW line of sight. Think about it: sights or scope on a gun (line of sight). Above or below the barrel?

Duck 01-18-2008 03:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeepejeep (Post 14467)
Doesn't need to be a vacuum. Gravity pulls the same no matter what just as others have said here.

Yes, you do need the vacuum. Air creates resistance that takes a greater effect on a lighter object. Don't believe me? Drop a piece of paper and a rock at the same time. The air resistance restricts the paper's fall. In a vacuum, there is no air so the resistance isn't there.

Also, a bullet actually arcs upwards as it leaves the muzzle. That bullet would have a further distance to fall, so would probably hit the ground last.


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