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Old 09-30-2013, 10:57 AM   #11
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I take pride in knowing that I have completed the entire process. Loading the round, making the shot, cleaning, skinning, butchering, packing. It makes eating it that much better. It is an accomplishment. Buying something from the store makes it easy to take things for granted.

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Old 09-30-2013, 10:58 AM   #12
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Anyone hunting animals should be a proficient shooter before they start, wounding is a no no even for trash animals! Shooting varmints is AOK, Ive tried eating a few but for the most part, killem and keep walking. Farmers killing varmints on their own land is perfectly OK, when you live off your land, you know good from bad better than anyone. You cant imagine what kind of trouble woodchucks and coyotes can cause on a farm.

Feral Swine are crossover varmints, they are pig afterall, dont leave them to rot, eat them, yum!
Pigs here are a bit of a lottery eating wise. Pigs out of the more mountainous areas of Australia(East Coast) most pigs are a reasonably safe bet but anything out in the back country(read Western Plains) is a dodgy bet as they'll eat anything.

Over here rabbits, Hares, ducks, Magpie Geese, pigs, goats, camel and buffalo can be eaten but animals like foxes, wild dogs, feral cats, horses, donkeys are shot and left or used as bait for feral pigs or wild dogs.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:11 AM   #13
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I only feel bad about killing a game animal, if I didn't make a good quick killing shot. I haven't had to kill other animals for any other reason, except for mice, rats and a couple of dogs that I loved dearly and it was best to have them put down.

This little story illustrates my view of killing & being part of the food chain. Many moons ago when I was 18 or 19 years old, I was hunting with my smooth bore 12 guage, shooting rifled slugs. I shot a forkhorn buck in the spine at about 50 yards. He went down, but wasn't going to die very quickly. After I got over to him, he was still breathing and looking at me but was paralyzed from the neck down.

I decided to pull out my Buck knife and slit his throat, which I did by getting down behind his head and, pulling his chin up and slitting his windpipe and various arteries & veins. He died quickly after that, but the spurting and gurgling of blood in his lungs and the look in his eye, freaked me out a bit. After taking that buck to the butcher, I didn't hunt the next season.

After much reflection, I chose to continue hunting, because I didn't want to forget what it takes to be willing to take a life, so that my life could continue.

I'm not one of those guys who does the high-five, cheesy smile and war whoop every time I harvest game.

NO meat begins plasti-wrapped in the butcher's case. I feel we need to be mindful of the lives that are taken so that we can enjoy the benefits of eating meats. I always take a moment and thank God for the bounty that is available, every time I kill a game animal. I don't feel that connectedness when I grab a steak or chicken breast out of the refrigerated case at the store.

I don't want to lose that connection.

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Old 09-30-2013, 11:54 AM   #14
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I only feel bad about killing a game animal, if I didn't make a good quick killing shot. I haven't had to kill other animals for any other reason, except for mice, rats and a couple of dogs that I loved dearly and it was best to have them put down.

This little story illustrates my view of killing & being part of the food chain. Many moons ago when I was 18 or 19 years old, I was hunting with my smooth bore 12 guage, shooting rifled slugs. I shot a forkhorn buck in the spine at about 50 yards. He went down, but wasn't going to die very quickly. After I got over to him, he was still breathing and looking at me but was paralyzed from the neck down.

I decided to pull out my Buck knife and slit his throat, which I did by getting down behind his head and, pulling his chin up and slitting his windpipe and various arteries & veins. He died quickly after that, but the spurting and gurgling of blood in his lungs and the look in his eye, freaked me out a bit. After taking that buck to the butcher, I didn't hunt the next season.

After much reflection, I chose to continue hunting, because I didn't want to forget what it takes to be willing to take a life, so that my life could continue.

I'm not one of those guys who does the high-five, cheesy smile and war whoop every time I harvest game.

NO meat begins plasti-wrapped in the butcher's case. I feel we need to be mindful of the lives that are taken so that we can enjoy the benefits of eating meats. I always take a moment and thank God for the bounty that is available, every time I kill a game animal. I don't feel that connectedness when I grab a steak or chicken breast out of the refrigerated case at the store.

I don't want to lose that connection.
So wise, so true!

I once shot a Robin with my BB Gun, it was quick and done but it ate at me for years, shooting song birds is a big no no. Ive done a few things I regret in life, most of them were associated with causing mental or physical pain to others be them animals or human animals, I would be lying if i said I hadnt made bad choices, I try daily to make fewer of them.

Life is the most precious commodity for all living organisms, we being the thinking animal we are must reason our actions or risk self if not deity imposed purgatory. The phrase "a Righteous Kill" is truly relative to the situation at hand, "God give me the insight to know good from bad" is my mantra.

There is no joy of killing I can appreciate but there are many reasons to terminate the life of one thing in the hopes of preserving another. Self Defense, Clothing, Shelter, Population Control and maintenance and lastly but not least, yummy meals for you and your family that is safer to consume than chicken McNugglets!
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:34 PM   #15
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Humans are by nature hunter-gatherers,, the hunting instinct is in everyone, how it is acted upon depends on many factors but the instinct is still there. A house wife zeroing on a sale at the local market to get more for her money for the family can correlate to a prehistoric woman gathering clams at low tide,, she can get more for the energy expended to gather them then, a stock broker going for the kill on Wall Street is essentially the same as a group of ancient hunters closing in on a mastodon generations past. We all hunt and gather in our own way, I feel the connection with my forefathers most when I am in the woods with my rifle or longbow or whatever hunting implement I may use. When I do make a kill, there is some remorse but also a sense of reverence for the animal taken and the responsibility to use all I can from the kill. Most people in urban areas will never have that experience due to their particular circumstance. To me, hunting and taking an animal is a very reverent experience, I have what my wife calls weird quirks such as placing grass in the mouth of a deer I have taken,, giving him his last meal, thanking the deer for giving me many meals, or while processing the animal, I like to place it's head so it can see that it is being used well and not wasted. It may be kind of corny to some, but that is the way I was taught to respect the animals life. I feel that most hunters have a higher regard for the animals in the forest than most so called environmentalists. There is a responsibility that comes with hunting, I think most try to uphold that/ some don't, which everyone hears about, casting an unfair pall on those who do their best to be ethical.

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Old 09-30-2013, 12:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eatmydust View Post
I only feel bad about killing a game animal, if I didn't make a good quick killing shot. I haven't had to kill other animals for any other reason, except for mice, rats and a couple of dogs that I loved dearly and it was best to have them put down.

This little story illustrates my view of killing & being part of the food chain. Many moons ago when I was 18 or 19 years old, I was hunting with my smooth bore 12 guage, shooting rifled slugs. I shot a forkhorn buck in the spine at about 50 yards. He went down, but wasn't going to die very quickly. After I got over to him, he was still breathing and looking at me but was paralyzed from the neck down.

I decided to pull out my Buck knife and slit his throat, which I did by getting down behind his head and, pulling his chin up and slitting his windpipe and various arteries & veins. He died quickly after that, but the spurting and gurgling of blood in his lungs and the look in his eye, freaked me out a bit. After taking that buck to the butcher, I didn't hunt the next season.

After much reflection, I chose to continue hunting, because I didn't want to forget what it takes to be willing to take a life, so that my life could continue.

I'm not one of those guys who does the high-five, cheesy smile and war whoop every time I harvest game.

NO meat begins plasti-wrapped in the butcher's case. I feel we need to be mindful of the lives that are taken so that we can enjoy the benefits of eating meats. I always take a moment and thank God for the bounty that is available, every time I kill a game animal. I don't feel that connectedness when I grab a steak or chicken breast out of the refrigerated case at the store.

I don't want to lose that connection.
That pretty well describes how I feel about hunting. I really like being outdoors hunting and the fun of hunting with friends and family, but I don't look forward to actually killing one of God's creatures. I think it's better though for me to go out and humanly kill a wild animal to supply my meals than to go to the grocery store and get an animal that is so far removed from it's natural environment that it really isn't even viewed as an animal anymore. Like you said "no meat begins plasti-wrapped", but we don't see that with store bought meat and we don't give the animals that provided that meat the respect they deserve.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:37 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by magnumman View Post
I take pride in knowing that I have completed the entire process. Loading the round, making the shot, cleaning, skinning, butchering, packing. It makes eating it that much better. It is an accomplishment. Buying something from the store makes it easy to take things for granted.
there is nothing 'humane' about a meat processing facility. people just don't have to look at reality when they buy ground chuck at the store. out of sight out of mind

tempted to see if Mods will move this thread to the 'puppies and kittens' section of the forum.......
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:38 PM   #18
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Op, lots of good thoughts here. My thought is put yourself in the animals "shoes". I would rather live my life in the wild, running, playing (deer do that), reproducing, etc., and would rather die in the wild, looking up into the sky.

Compare that to living in a pen, often times immovable, smelling your own waste along with 999 others waste, and dying in line with the others.

Add in the health benefits of wild game with no antibiotics, steroids, etc.

Everyone should kill, clean, and eat an animal once in their lives, unless they choose to be a vegetarian. Doing this gives a great appreciation to the process and amount of work involved. Buying meat is paying someone to do the dirty work for you.

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Old 09-30-2013, 12:39 PM   #19
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I personally do not hunt.

Sound of brakes locking up, and a loud bang, broke the silence about midnight some years back, outside my country home.

I go outside to see a large, almost moose size, male deer in the ditch. The vehicle drives off to get a rifle. I go get my Glock 20. As I come back outside, I see the deer limp off slowly into the woods.

I follow the deer. It had walked south some, paralleling the road 200 yards, and laid down by a tree. I approached the deer, and he raised his front up, without getting up. Sitting like a house dog on a favorite rug. I decided it was hurt bad, but sometimes, nature fixes its own problems. I holstered my Glock.

About then, four pickups pull up, and ten hunters get out with rifles.
I and the deer, hiding behind some trees, watch as these men with flashlights enter the woods.

I and the deer watch quietly as the men, first walk south 100 yards, then turn north. They walk 300 yards away, and return to the road, and drive away. This lasted the longest 20 minutes of my life.

The deer and I are very close, just feet apart. The deer stands up, looking down on me with huge eyes, and a massive rack. The look in his eye, was the look of a thank you, and he turned and walked out of the woods toward the east, and into a mature corn field and disappeared.

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Old 09-30-2013, 12:47 PM   #20
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If it's a varmint or food, no problem!

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