Brake Caliper and Piston question
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Old 05-31-2013, 06:53 PM   #1
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Alright y'all, got a small debacle and I can't seem to find much on it from google. The rear brake on my Yamaha is seized up. But not like it would be normally. The piston is stuck inside the caliper and won't budge at all. I've already flushed the system, checked the line for kinks to make sure it's getting fluid to it and everything. Even sprayed a de-greaser lubricant on it and re-lubed it but still nothing. Any ideas? I'd like to avoid taking it to a shop due to the outrageous hourly charges

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Old 06-01-2013, 12:34 AM   #2
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You will need a air compressor,take your caliper off the bike,drain the remaining fluid,now where the brake line attaches use a air nozzle with a rubber tip that will fit the brake line opening.
Be very very careful not to get your fingers in the way of the piston that should shoot out like a missile,don't ask me how I know. lol

Inspect your piston for pits or rust,if it's in bad shape you may need to order a new piston along with a seal kit.

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Old 06-01-2013, 09:50 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOshooter
You will need a air compressor,take your caliper off the bike,drain the remaining fluid,now where the brake line attaches use a air nozzle with a rubber tip that will fit the brake line opening.
Be very very careful not to get your fingers in the way of the piston that should shoot out like a missile,don't ask me how I know. lol

Inspect your piston for pits or rust,if it's in bad shape you may need to order a new piston along with a seal kit.
Is there any way besides an Air Compressor? I don't have one where I live
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Old 06-01-2013, 11:03 PM   #4
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Air compressor is best but I have pulled them off and used the brake pedal but it makes a mess. Also when using an air compressor I lay a wooden hammer handle inside the caliper to catch the piston. And lastly I am not sure about how it is in the motorcycle world but in the automotive world you can buy a rebuilt caliper for just about the same price as you can build one anymore.

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Old 06-02-2013, 09:07 AM   #5
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Diagosis of the problem would be easier with the year and model.

Since you don't have a compressor, use the brake pedal to build up the pressure needed to pop the piston out of the bore. When you do this, take an old towel and fold it over then stick it between the piston and the caliper on the stationary side. This will catch the piston and reduce the amount of mess from the brake fluid when the piston come out. Or see if you have a friend that will let you use their compressor, and do the same thing with the air hose atachment.

Contact your local Yamaha dealer, oe check the internet for a caliper rebuild kit for you bike. You will need sandpaper, a scotchbrite pad, brake cleaner, and some fine steel wood. With the piston out of the bore, inspect it for rust, pits, and cracks. Check the seals for tearing or cracking. Remove the seals and clean both the bore and the piston with the above mentioned abrasives , starting with the sandpaper, ending with the steel wool, using the brake cleaner between products, and rinse the bore and piston with the cleaner after you use the steel wool. Be gebtle. All you are trying to do is remove the rust and crud from the parts. Only use the Scotchbrite and steel wool to clean the grooves for the seals, and make sure the a completely clean before installing the new seal. Make sure you remove the banjo bolt (Hose xonector) and the blleder screw when you start the process, and leave them out until you have put the caliper back on your bike.

To re-install the piston after the seals are replaced, line up the piston with the bore. Next, Put the stationary part of the C-clamp on the outside back of the bore, and the conpressing side centered in the piston, and start cranking. this should center and seat the piston in the bore. Re-install the caliper on the bike, hook up the brake hose, and bleed the brake. Your rear caliper is now rebuilt, and you should be good to go.

rebuilding the caliper is about a half hour to 45 minute job. and the parts, assuming that you caliper and piston are in good shape,should e less than $30. Best of luck, and let us know how it works out

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Old 06-02-2013, 09:33 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kfox75
Diagosis of the problem would be easier with the year and model.

Since you don't have a compressor, use the brake pedal to build up the pressure needed to pop the piston out of the bore. When you do this, take an old towel and fold it over then stick it between the piston and the caliper on the stationary side. This will catch the piston and reduce the amount of mess from the brake fluid when the piston come out. Or see if you have a friend that will let you use their compressor, and do the same thing with the air hose atachment.

Contact your local Yamaha dealer, oe check the internet for a caliper rebuild kit for you bike. You will need sandpaper, a scotchbrite pad, brake cleaner, and some fine steel wood. With the piston out of the bore, inspect it for rust, pits, and cracks. Check the seals for tearing or cracking. Remove the seals and clean both the bore and the piston with the above mentioned abrasives , starting with the sandpaper, ending with the steel wool, using the brake cleaner between products, and rinse the bore and piston with the cleaner after you use the steel wool. Be gebtle. All you are trying to do is remove the rust and crud from the parts. Only use the Scotchbrite and steel wool to clean the grooves for the seals, and make sure the a completely clean before installing the new seal. Make sure you remove the banjo bolt (Hose xonector) and the blleder screw when you start the process, and leave them out until you have put the caliper back on your bike.

To re-install the piston after the seals are replaced, line up the piston with the bore. Next, Put the stationary part of the C-clamp on the outside back of the bore, and the conpressing side centered in the piston, and start cranking. this should center and seat the piston in the bore. Re-install the caliper on the bike, hook up the brake hose, and bleed the brake. Your rear caliper is now rebuilt, and you should be good to go.

rebuilding the caliper is about a half hour to 45 minute job. and the parts, assuming that you caliper and piston are in good shape,should e less than $30. Best of luck, and let us know how it works out
It's a 2012 Yamaha FZ6r. And I'll have them check it if I can't get it working when I take it up for an oil change next week
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Old 06-02-2013, 09:39 AM   #7
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Another option occurs to me. If the caliper is still on the bike, apply the rear brake, and give the caliper a couple raps with a soft faced hammer. It may loosen up the piston. You may have to reset it with a C-clamp a couple of times and repeat the process, but this may work.

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Old 06-02-2013, 10:50 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kfox75
Another option occurs to me. If the caliper is still on the bike, apply the rear brake, and give the caliper a couple raps with a soft faced hammer. It may loosen up the piston. You may have to reset it with a C-clamp a couple of times and repeat the process, but this may work.
I actually never thought of that.. I have a rubber mallet at home, sitting on the dining room table
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:01 AM   #9
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Be very careful of the brake fluid.

It is hydraulic fluid, and will instantly

remove the paint from any surface

it touches.

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Old 06-02-2013, 11:45 AM   #10
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Sometimes a little brake fluid applied around the outside of the cylinder may help (as well as other suggestions given.)

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