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dragunovsks 03-19-2009 03:37 PM

Bhp?
 
I was watching Top Ten Infantry Fighting Vehicles on the Military Channel a couple weeks back and they were using a term that I've never heard of. Maybe some of you Jeep guys could answer it. When they got to the German half-track of WWII, they used the term "Brake" (or break) horsepower, BHP. They didn't use the term to describe the horsepower of all WWII vehicles and in fact didn't use it to describe more than two German WWII vehicles.

What does BHP mean?

I know this is a gun forum but IFVs have guns too.:D

cpttango30 03-19-2009 04:09 PM

break horse power

AsmelEduardo 03-19-2009 04:21 PM

Brake horsepower
 
Brake horsepower (abbreviated bhp) is the measure of an engine's horsepower without the loss in power caused by the gearbox, generator, differential, water pump, and other auxiliary components such as alternator, power steering pump, muffled exhaust system, etc. "Brake" refers to a device which was used to load an engine and hold it at a desired RPM. During testing, the output torque and rotational speed were measured to determine the "brake horsepower". Horsepower was originally measured and calculated by use of the indicator (a James Watt invention of the late 18th century), and later by means of a De Prony brake connected to the engine's output shaft. More recently, an engine dynamometer is used instead of a De Prony brake. The output delivered to the driving wheels is less than that obtainable at the engine's crankshaft

c3shooter 03-19-2009 08:16 PM

Agree- was probably Brake Horsepower. However, there WAS an infrequently used British Horsepower. You may also encounter SAE Horsepower, Boiler Horsepower (steam boiler) and Shaft Hosrepower (aircraft, ships). Horsepower - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

skullcrusher 03-19-2009 08:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AsmelEduardo (Post 84231)
Brake horsepower (abbreviated bhp) is the measure of an engine's horsepower without the loss in power caused by the gearbox, generator, differential, water pump, and other auxiliary components such as alternator, power steering pump, muffled exhaust system, etc. "Brake" refers to a device which was used to load an engine and hold it at a desired RPM. During testing, the output torque and rotational speed were measured to determine the "brake horsepower". Horsepower was originally measured and calculated by use of the indicator (a James Watt invention of the late 18th century), and later by means of a De Prony brake connected to the engine's output shaft. More recently, an engine dynamometer is used instead of a De Prony brake. The output delivered to the driving wheels is less than that obtainable at the engine's crankshaft

Amsel, while I am impressed with your post, it seems as you have copied and then pasted. No problem with doing so, but you did not write that post. Your English is understandable, but you don't do as well as that.

I believe you are a valuable poster here, especially since you are deep-deep behind enemy lines. Maybe show a source of something so techinical, albeit understandably simple.
:D

AsmelEduardo 03-19-2009 09:33 PM

it was cut and paste from a CD that I recived in a Caterpillar training :D ...Sorry for not put the source... the CD was a backup (copy) and only says TSRV003... is a course of diesel engines that I recived in the company that I used to work :D

skullcrusher 03-19-2009 09:42 PM

Cool. Great info.

dragunovsks 03-20-2009 02:40 AM

Thanx for the info. I've heard on boiler horsepower and shaft horsepower but I've never heard of SAE hp either. Of course, I'm not a mechanic or anything.


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