Beekeeping - Page 6
You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of FirearmsTalk.com!    
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Discussion Forums > The Club House >

Beekeeping


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-01-2013, 02:52 AM   #51
Lifetime Supporting Member
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,922
Liked 9088 Times on 5276 Posts
Likes Given: 11970

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by towboater View Post
A guy that lives nearby says he will help me get started. Maybe I should give him a call tomorrow.
Good idea. When bees start swarming he will be too busy to help you get your stuff together.

There are a couple of beekeeping supply outfits in KY, but you need to know what to get before you go in.

I found this place in Clarkson https://kelleybees.com/

And Dadant in Frankfort- http://www.dadant.com/

I have used Dadant before, they have been around for over 100 years, one of the premier books on beekeeping is Dadant's "First Lessons in Beekeeping" that has been updated by Kieth Delaplane- it is a great book. I recommend reading at least one book on the subject before getting your bees and this is a good one. http://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=32_58&products_id=932

I don't think there are a lot of books out there on top-bar hive beekeeping, most all of the major beekeeping suppliers use the Langstroth. You can build your own top-bar hive with minimal tools and a small amount of skill. I have seen kits for around $100, but quite honestly my Dad built mine for much less and he was a freaking nut case about the details, so he went all-out on the materials, using 5/8" marine plywood for the main pieces. A piece of that was the most expensive part. But if you are up for building one it is a fun project. Dad loved building them for me, he liked telling everybody about it too.
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:59 AM   #52
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
towboater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Somewares,Ky
Posts: 3,594
Liked 1734 Times on 902 Posts
Likes Given: 3667

Default

Thanks. for the links. I'll keep ya updated on how it goes.
towboater is offline  
Vikingdad Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:11 AM   #53
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: The green, green grass of home.
Posts: 448
Liked 135 Times on 109 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikingdad View Post
LOL! I will have to add that to my resume for my voice work! I have it described as a deep baritone/bass, etc., Have to make that a "sexy baritone/bass"!

(I wish more women told me that!)
Women, hell, I was gonna say the same thing! LOL Seriously, I thought "that guy has a good voice for unassuming, Peoria, voiceovers."

Now, when I get hives there are no bees nor honey!

Last edited by MattShlock; 04-01-2013 at 03:15 AM.
MattShlock is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:18 AM   #54
Lifetime Supporting Member
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,922
Liked 9088 Times on 5276 Posts
Likes Given: 11970

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattShlock View Post
for unassuming, Peoria, voiceovers."
I missed that reference.....

Quote:
Now, when I get hives there are no bees nor honey!
LOL! I will take the bees and the honey too!
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:29 AM   #55
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3,617
Liked 815 Times on 623 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikingdad View Post
I missed that reference.....



LOL! I will take the bees and the honey too!
He is saying that although you wouldn't excite anyone but Wind-of-Change you'd be good and non-offensive to the everyman (or woman) in middle-America. As in "but will it play in Peoria?" For the longest time in the marketing world Peoria, Il, was a significant community that proportionately reflected the demographics of the entire nation and it was very convenient to test new products and advertising there.

Last edited by HockaLouis; 04-01-2013 at 03:37 AM.
HockaLouis is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:44 AM   #56
Lifetime Supporting Member
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,922
Liked 9088 Times on 5276 Posts
Likes Given: 11970

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HockaLouis View Post
He is saying that although you wouldn't excite anyone but Wind-of-Change you'd be good and non-offensive to the everyman (or woman) in middle-America. As in "but will it play in Peoria?" For the longest time in the marketing world Peoria, Il, was a significant community that proportionately reflected the demographics of the entire nation and it was very convenient to test new products and advertising there.
Ah! OK, I'm familiar with the Peoria remark now that you remind me.


Little bummed that Winds is the only one that would be excited by my voice though...... no offense to Winds intended.
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 04:17 AM   #57
Lifetime Supporting Member
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,922
Liked 9088 Times on 5276 Posts
Likes Given: 11970

Default

I've been looking over videos on beekeeping and have found a few that I thought were worthwhile. This first one is not so much what he does right, but what he does wrong. I am not sure what this "birdhouse" thing he is taking about is all about, but I will say there are a couple of things wrong with his design. First of all it is too tall, the combs will not support themselves if they are hung entirely from the top bars, making them more easily removed for inspections. I made mine 12" deep. A comb that tall should be self-supporting without being attached to the sides. On the other hand though you can make it wider, instead of taller. They don't care how wide the combs are really, though I think anything over about two feet would probably be a bit too wide. They would leave transit holes in the combs if they want them, but I can't say I have seen combs wider than about 2 feet.

Another thing is his sides are not built to the correct angles. A top-bar hive should look like one half of a hexagon, with the angles between the sides and floor at about 60 degrees (or one sixth of 360 degrees) to each other. A hexagon being the shape of a honeycomb cell. The bees will build their comb entirely supported off of the top bar, leaving the sides and bottom unattached so they can walk around the combs to work. If you build the sides at any other angles, or if the hive is too deep (space from the top bars to the floor) they will attach their combs to the sides for support.

Lastly I would say that the entrance should be perpendicular to the combs. I have seen several times where the bees will build their combs perpendicular to their entrance, even when there are frames in place to encourage them to do otherwise. I am not sure if this is just an observation of something that is not always so, but I do it my way just in case.

He is also a dumbass for using that noisy electric drill as he does. He deserves to get stung. If it is absolutely necessary to do something like that, use hand tools and work very slowly, also smoke them so they will be more docile. Too much noise and vibration will cause them to do what they did. You can see when they start getting agitated the guard bees start spilling out of the entrance hole at the bottom of the side facing the camera. They are pissed off at this point. He should have cut the hole and left them for awhile before attempting to put the blocking board and other top bars back in. They probably would have let him do this without attacking if he had just waited until all of those bees that were spilling out of the entrance had gone back inside.

Here is the video- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GKPRKjujzQ
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:49 PM   #58
FAA licensed bugsmasher
FTF_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ScottA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Davenport,IA
Posts: 7,140
Liked 2477 Times on 1328 Posts
Likes Given: 879

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikingdad View Post
I've been looking over videos on beekeeping and have found a few that I thought were worthwhile. This first one is not so much what he does right, but what he does wrong. I am not sure what this "birdhouse" thing he is taking about is all about, but I will say there are a couple of things wrong with his design. First of all it is too tall, the combs will not support themselves if they are hung entirely from the top bars, making them more easily removed for inspections. I made mine 12" deep. A comb that tall should be self-supporting without being attached to the sides. On the other hand though you can make it wider, instead of taller. They don't care how wide the combs are really, though I think anything over about two feet would probably be a bit too wide. They would leave transit holes in the combs if they want them, but I can't say I have seen combs wider than about 2 feet.

Another thing is his sides are not built to the correct angles. A top-bar hive should look like one half of a hexagon, with the angles between the sides and floor at about 60 degrees (or one sixth of 360 degrees) to each other. A hexagon being the shape of a honeycomb cell. The bees will build their comb entirely supported off of the top bar, leaving the sides and bottom unattached so they can walk around the combs to work. If you build the sides at any other angles, or if the hive is too deep (space from the top bars to the floor) they will attach their combs to the sides for support.

Lastly I would say that the entrance should be perpendicular to the combs. I have seen several times where the bees will build their combs perpendicular to their entrance, even when there are frames in place to encourage them to do otherwise. I am not sure if this is just an observation of something that is not always so, but I do it my way just in case.

He is also a dumbass for using that noisy electric drill as he does. He deserves to get stung. If it is absolutely necessary to do something like that, use hand tools and work very slowly, also smoke them so they will be more docile. Too much noise and vibration will cause them to do what they did. You can see when they start getting agitated the guard bees start spilling out of the entrance hole at the bottom of the side facing the camera. They are pissed off at this point. He should have cut the hole and left them for awhile before attempting to put the blocking board and other top bars back in. They probably would have let him do this without attacking if he had just waited until all of those bees that were spilling out of the entrance had gone back inside.

Here is the video- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GKPRKjujzQ
I would guess he's one of those guys that thinks smoke is for wusses, teaches their kids to beat up other kids, and likes to watch his dog going to town on someone's leg.
__________________
Scott

Quote:
If you're not representing Jesus in a way that makes people want to hang out with you, you're doing it wrong.
Quote:
Those who refuse to participate in politics shall be governed by their inferiors. -Plato
Join the NRA
ScottA is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 01:34 AM   #59
Lifetime Supporting Member
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,922
Liked 9088 Times on 5276 Posts
Likes Given: 11970

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottA View Post
I would guess he's one of those guys that thinks smoke is for wusses, teaches their kids to beat up other kids, and likes to watch his dog going to town on someone's leg.
That tough guy BS will only get you stung when working with bees. Well, that and stupid.
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes




Newest Threads