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-   -   Any Commercial Contractors? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/any-commercial-contractors-88646/)

idareya 04-12-2013 01:13 AM

Any Commercial Contractors?
 
If any of you guys have this job or anything similar to it please give a description and what education is needed. Do you like it or should I look for a new carrier?

fa35jsf 04-12-2013 01:35 AM

Like a Defense Contractor?

c3shooter 04-12-2013 02:01 AM

I think the gent is referring to a General Contractor for Construction- one who oversees the building of a structures, and coordinates the work of specialty subcontractors, such as electricians, plumbers, etc.

Yeah, have some experience in the construction field- will try to answer-

Education- you better know business. It is good to know how much concrete you need to order, but if you do not know how to create an estimate that can be transformed to a proposal, and how much you need to charge to cover materials, labor, insurance, equipment, etc- you may get the contract- and go broke trying to fill it.

If you mean being a homebuilder- Hoo boy! Better look at what has happened to business volume for those folks over the past 3 years- it has been DESOLATE out there. But there are still houses built, and folks still in business, Just a lot fewer of both.

So what is your background, and what experience have you had beyond swinging da hammer?

SB777 04-12-2013 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by idareya (Post 1211056)
If any of you guys have this job or anything similar to it please give a description and what education is needed. Do you like it or should I look for a new carrier?

You’re talking about an industry that employees many types of career opportunities. If you’re looking to start your own business you better have expertise in a particular trade then seek to gain the business skills needed to handle the financial requirements. If you are looking to get into the business as an employee then what are your ambitions? Are you interested in management or other administrative functions? Are you interested in learning a trade or shopping out a trade in which you have already acquired the skills?

NotMormon 04-12-2013 05:41 AM

In my seven years as a GC, two items come to mind as a requirement. You need to be heavily insured and you better have a dam good lawyer. The rest was basically covered by C3. Commercial construction is not for the faint of heart. There are many devious ways to get your ship sunk.

Save your sanity and work your way up the ranks at McDonalds.;)

Jake86 04-12-2013 05:57 AM

or a fourth generation family owned business. We have different divisions, the division I head up does work in the government sector. I grew up doing commercial demolition though....

I went to school for engineering, but a degree isn't needed. My grandfather never graduated high school and took a two mam trucking company (him and my great-grandfather) to a multi million dollar a year business.

Seeing as I am a general contractor in the gov sector. I can try to answer any questions you might have.

First, figure out what market you want to play in. I assume you have a LLC? Work Comp/General Liability Insurance? OK you have all that, what about your estimator? Are you bidding work yourself? If nor then you better hire a good one. Not some bid assembler who relies on quotes from subs to price a job. Someone who knows what the work is worth.

You got that, OK what about your project administration? Submittals, health and safety plans, pre construction surveys, work plans, accounts for supplies, etc....

Get that far yet? Who is going to run the job? Do the job costing, scheduling, write rfi's, contracts, purchase orders, do Billings, certified payroll, etc...

What about misc clerical? Who is going keep the phones answered, office supplied, take care of paying bills, opening mail? It nay not seem like much now, but when you're ******* deep in a project working 90hrs a week any help counts.

What about project superintendent. Someone on the site all day everyday? This guy needs to know his ****. He's your quality control.

What about a general labor? You're going to need some guys doing the stupid ****. Building partitions, sweeping floors, etc.

There is oh so much more. Think about it before jumping into it.

Jake86 04-12-2013 06:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NotMormon (Post 1211231)
In my seven years as a GC, two items come to mind as a requirement. You need to be heavily insured and you better have a dam good lawyer. The rest was basically covered by C3. Commercial construction is not for the faint of heart. There are many devious ways to get your ship sunk.

Save your sanity and work your way up the ranks at McDonalds.;)

Great advice! Prepare for a lifetime of stress. Sometimes I wonder why I still do it. I love taking a concept and turning it into a tangible reality. Being born and bred for it helps too. Being only 27yrs old, I am quite good at what I do....

NotMormon 04-12-2013 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jake86 (Post 1211242)
Great advice! Prepare for a lifetime of stress. Sometimes I wonder why I still do it. I love taking a concept and turning it into a tangible reality. Being born and bred for it helps too. Being only 27yrs old, I am quite good at what I do....

I like your bid assembler comment.:D That was a great summation on the diseased portion of being a GC.

Jake86 04-12-2013 06:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NotMormon (Post 1211252)

I like your bid assembler comment.:D That was a great summation on the diseased portion of being a GC.

I never understood how some of these guys made any money...

c3shooter 04-12-2013 08:53 AM

How do those guys make money?

Three contractors were visiting a tourist attraction on the same day. One was from New York, another from Texas, and the third from Florida.

At the end of the tour, the guard asked them what they did for a living. When they all replied that they were contractors, the guard said, "Hey, we need one of the rear fences redone. Why don't you guys take a look at it and give me a bid?"

So, to the back fence they all went to check it out.

First to step up was the Florida contractor. He took out his tape measure and pencil, did some measuring and said, "Well I figure the job will run about $900. $400 for materials, $400 for my crew, and $100 profit for me."

Next was the Texas contractor. He also took out his tape measure and pencil, did some quick figuring and said, "Looks like I can do this job for $700. $300 for materials, $300 for my crew, and $100 profit for me.

Without so much as moving, the New York contractor said, "$2,700."

The guard, incredulous, looked at him and said, "You didn't even measure like the other guys! How did you come up with such a high figure?"

"Easy," he said $1,000 for me, $1,000 for you and we hire the guy from Texas."


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