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Old 05-05-2012, 03:57 AM   #21
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This was not the first time the military fired on civilians and it will not be the last. It was a sad time in history but it should leave no doubt that the military will fire on civilians again. Not all but some.

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Old 05-05-2012, 05:00 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by 2ndAmendmentFreedom View Post
Ok I'm reading contradicting information all over the internet, some sources are saying they started shooting at a distance of more than 300ft, and other sources are saying that protesters were about to attack the guards.
The victims of the shootings, both dead and wounded, were hit from a distance of 100 yards or more, that is correct. The report of the beginning of the shooting scene was as follows, according to the National Guard version. You also need to bear in mind that the day before, this crowd had burned the ROTC building to the ground, so it was a violent group.

General Robert Canterbury was not technically in command of the Guard at the time, LtCol Charles Fassinger was. These were both regular Army officers, not guardsmen themselves. But as things got tense on the scene, the general took over, as follows.

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Late in the morning a police official, riding in a Guard jeep, approached the main body of students and read them the “riot act” ordering them to disperse or face arrest. While repeating this warning the jeep was pelted with rocks, forcing it to retreat. One Guardsman was injured by shattered glass from the windshield; the first of 50 soldiers who would be hurt in the next hour.
General Canterbury, who was on-site by the ROTC ruins, decided to have the troops move the students off the Commons and to the other side of Taylor Hall (the building with the colonnade). In a quick meeting with LTC Fassinger and the three company commanders a plan was developed. It called for Company C, with 36 men, to move to the left of Taylor Hall while Company A and Troop G totaling about 90 men) would move straight ahead, pushing the crowd over “Blanket Hill” on the right of Taylor Hall.

At noon Canterbury gave his approval to begin. The company officers ordered their men to “lock and load” their weapons, fix bayonets, adjust their gas masks and, as the grenadiers fired their first CS rounds, 125 Ohio Guardsmen stepped off to confront the students and in the process, entered American history.

The protesters, still shouting obscenities, allowed themselves to be pushed back at first. This changed as the troops approached the base of Blanket Hill. The men came under an intense shower of rocks, bricks and pieces of concrete with steel rods protruding from them. Some of the protesters had actually stockpiled these missiles for just this purpose. The Guardsmen started taking causalities with several men falling out due to injuries. Company C on the left had six men hurt, three of whom needed hospital treatment including one man hit in the mouth, breaking some teeth. By far the largest numbers of Guard causalities were suffered in the main body on the right. Company A had 10 men injured, one of whom was struck seven times by missiles. The soldiers of Troop G fared the worse with 33 men being hit. Among these were several men with cut faces and broken bones.

Amid thick clouds of gas the remaining Guardsmen of the main body (estimated to be only about 70 men) finally crested the hill, moving to the left of a metal sculpture, nicknamed the “Pagoda.” After some maneuvering which pushed the protesters into a parking lot by Prentice Hall (a dorm overlooking the hill), the troops came back up on the right side of the Pagoda. At this point, they ran out of tear gas. Perhaps sensing the Guard’s helplessness the crowd moved toward the soldiers. The barrage of rocks increased and men continued to be hurt. The troops felt cut off and many later said they feared for their lives. Suddenly the shouting was broken by a sound which caught all who heard it by surprise. It was the sound of gunfire, as the Guardsmen shot into the crowd they feared.

Despite extensive federal, state and private investigations, no one has ever determined who actually fired the first shot. No one ordered it. Many of the Guardsmen and some bystanders in the crowd said they heard a single shot from Prentice Hall, which was quickly followed by a ragged volley from the troops. Though various sources give different numbers of Guardsmen shooting and the number of rounds fired, the official accounts state 16 men fired between 35—40 rounds, all from M-1 rifles. Of these 13 people were struck, four of whom were killed. Some unofficial accounts say that one of those hit was struck by a non-military round, though the bullet was never produced as evidence. A search of Prentice Hall uncovered firearms but none were recently fired. To this day a metal sculpture near the Pagoda, which was behind the troops when they fired, has a bullet-type hole indicating the round came from the area of the crowd, toward the soldiers. But no official report supports the theory that the troops were fired upon.

The crowd and the Guardsmen were stunned. For a moment, a hush fell over the scene as the last of the gas and rifle smoke cleared. Then the silence was broken by protesters shouting “Kill the Pigs!” and other curses. However, they maintained their distance and stopped throwing rocks. The troops, some still in shock, reformed their ranks and marched without interference back to their start point. When they arrived they surrendered their weapons for the upcoming investigation. All ammunition was counted when turned in though the exact number of rounds issued remains unclear. The Guardsmen were then taken away for debriefing.

The university president closed Kent State for the rest of the school year. All students were off campus by Tuesday, the 5th and the last of the Guardsmen left on May 8th.

In the aftermath of the shootings, there were detailed federal and state investigations. An Ohio grand jury refused to charge any Guardsmen with criminal conduct. However, in 1973 the federal government charged eight men with violating the student’s civil rights; but the case was later dismissed. In 1974 the families of two of the dead students sued Governor Rhodes and the State of Ohio in federal court but settled the case before a verdict was reached. No Guardsman was ever convicted for the shooting. And no protesters were charged for assaulting the troops prior to the shootings.

http://www.ngef.org/index.asp?bid=265
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:17 AM   #23
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Cant say as that i "remember " this at all...considering my dear departed daddys FIRST order of business upon graduating from the university of "South East F**KING Asia" was making me and my skwaling self first drew breath on a snowy day in January 42 years ago....but i am astute enough a student of american history to know of these events only too well.

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Old 05-05-2012, 05:20 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canebrake View Post
42 years, WOW how time flies!

I was on patrol when we got word of the Kent State shooting.

How many of you remember this?



Tin soldiers and Nixon coming,
We're finally on our own.
This summer I hear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio.

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are gunning us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?





Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are gunning us down
Should have been done long ago.
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Tin soldiers and Nixon coming,
We're finally on our own.
This summer I hear the drumming,
Four dead in Ohio.







It happened during the last year I was in the service. If it had happened one year later in the spring of '71, I may have been there!
I remember it very well and have remembered it every May 4th since the day it happened. It was very much a part of my growing up during the Vietnam War era and all that was happening at that time here in America.
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:57 AM   #25
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I was an idea in my dads head to get "it" wet... Nice post shoobee, that's more than I ever learned about that day. P.s. Live rust is one of my all time favorite albums.

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Old 05-05-2012, 07:51 PM   #26
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I remember it well. "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times."

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Old 05-06-2012, 06:45 PM   #27
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I was a senior in college when it happened. I saw the film of the incident (at least what was shown in Athens, AL) and had a hard time believing it had happened.

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Old 05-06-2012, 07:40 PM   #28
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Quote:
This was not the first time the military fired on civilians
If you are a history buff, look up the strike at CFI in Colorado where the strikers were fired on with belt fed machine guns.

Of course, the largest insurrection since the 1860s was the Battle of Blair Mt WV, when the Army Air Corps bombed civilians with gas rounds left over from WW 1.

Then of course, we have the matter of the arsonist known as William Sherman..........
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:36 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
If you are a history buff, look up the strike at CFI in Colorado where the strikers were fired on with belt fed machine guns.

Of course, the largest insurrection since the 1860s was the Battle of Blair Mt WV, when the Army Air Corps bombed civilians with gas rounds left over from WW 1.

Then of course, we have the matter of the arsonist known as William Sherman..........
Ah, Sherman, the original American terrorist. He taught us how to make war on women and children. May he rot in Hell.
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:47 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chainfire

Ah, Sherman, the original American terrorist. He taught us how to make war on women and children. May he rot in Hell.
"It's easy, ya just don't lead them so much! Get some! Get some!"

Sorry, just watched Full Metal Jacket. All I could think of.
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