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Old 11-27-2012, 04:06 PM   #11
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Thats why I like my Arisakas..... Mine have the "mum" so Its very likely that they were taken from a dead solider.
I sometimes wonder what has been in the crosshairs of my Mosin PU or how many wars my M1903 has been in (mines from 1933 and ive read that the Marines still didnt want to give them up during Vietnam)

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Old 11-27-2012, 07:11 PM   #12
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It is very likely that between my Mosin Nagant (1939), and Nagant Revolver (1937), that one of them saw combat. That just adds to the coolness.

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Old 11-27-2012, 07:13 PM   #13
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Cool = when you can say your hunting rifle has very likely killed more men than deer.... and you don't have to worry about going to prison...

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Old 11-27-2012, 08:20 PM   #14
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The Soviets were always short of rifles, WWI and WWII. Any rifle that was produced before 1945 was almost certainly a vet. At times they went straight from the factory to the front. Many times the supply was so short the troops went to the front unarmed, expected to arm themselves with pick-ups. There was never enough supply of rifles for them to sit gathering dust in a warehouse.

If there was ever an inanimate object that held a ghost, these rifles would be it.

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Old 11-27-2012, 09:18 PM   #15
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Well, I have firearms that date back to the late 1800s (or at least I did before that HORRIBLE boating accident) Most were well used before I got them. For the hunting arms- I wonder how many crisp mornings with a touch of frost on the ground these saw with their former owners? Or a golden afternoon in dove season. How did that scratch get on the stock.

Who carried that revolver before I did? Honest holster wear- was it a fellow LEO that carried in some spooky places- but knew he always had at least one friend with him- in that holster.

Military arms- Was that rifle used to train soldiers for WW 1- or was it carried by some youngster pulling guard duty somewhere in 1936?

One of my 91/30s dates to 1924- carried in the Revolution?

Who were the sailors that learned to shoot at Great Lakes in 1944 with my Mossberg 22? Did they like it as much as I did?

My Mauser may have been caried by a sentry during the cold war.

I know who carried my K-31 for a buncha years- have swapped letters with him (left his name and address under the buttplate)

My first SKS- I know who had that- did not know his name, but I know what he looked like.

Never thought of it a spooky- more like a link between self and the guy that shot them before I did. Never get lonely with all that company!

Say, I wonder where my first M-14 is today???

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Old 11-27-2012, 09:52 PM   #16
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This ^^^^^^^ is exactly why I would prefer to keep (and spontaneously decided I WILL keep) my 1911 in it's original finish. I've only had it since February of this year, and look at the wear already. Every mark, scuff, chip in the grips, and shiny spot speak to me, saying "remember when...?" As I hope it will also one day speak to my son and my grandchildren.



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Old 11-28-2012, 01:04 AM   #17
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I have an 1873 Springfield Trapdoor. It was made in 1884 and shoots true. I have to wonder if it was used by someone in the U.S. Army Cavalry.

I have two Mosin-Nagants, one made in 1944 and the other made in 1946. Was one used to kill Nazis? Were they used to guard the border between East and West Germany.

Yes, I get an eerie feeling when I shoot them.

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Old 11-28-2012, 01:10 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
Well, I have firearms that date back to the late 1800s (or at least I did before that HORRIBLE boating accident) Most were well used before I got them. For the hunting arms- I wonder how many crisp mornings with a touch of frost on the ground these saw with their former owners? Or a golden afternoon in dove season. How did that scratch get on the stock.

Who carried that revolver before I did? Honest holster wear- was it a fellow LEO that carried in some spooky places- but knew he always had at least one friend with him- in that holster.

Military arms- Was that rifle used to train soldiers for WW 1- or was it carried by some youngster pulling guard duty somewhere in 1936?

One of my 91/30s dates to 1924- carried in the Revolution?

Who were the sailors that learned to shoot at Great Lakes in 1944 with my Mossberg 22? Did they like it as much as I did?

My Mauser may have been caried by a sentry during the cold war.

I know who carried my K-31 for a buncha years- have swapped letters with him (left his name and address under the buttplate)

My first SKS- I know who had that- did not know his name, but I know what he looked like.

Never thought of it a spooky- more like a link between self and the guy that shot them before I did. Never get lonely with all that company!

Say, I wonder where my first M-14 is today???
So tell us more about that K-31 and SKS, that is amazing that you have actually contacted one owner, and know what the other looks like.
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Old 11-28-2012, 01:14 AM   #19
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Considering his service history, I highly doubt that knowing what the owner of the SKS looks like can be related in a pleasant fashion, as it was a fairly commonly used rifle by the VC.

But, the Swiss commonly placed a name and contact information for the soldier their rifles were issued to, under the butt plate. It's actually been a fairly common practice among many collectors to try to track down the previous user. And there has actually been a lot of success in doing it.

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Old 11-28-2012, 01:52 AM   #20
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Trip- right on both counts.

My K-31 was issued to "Renee". The slip of paper beneath the buttplate would have the SN of the rifle, and the name and address of the soldier it was issued to. In case you should forget, and leave your rifle on the streetcar- so that it can be returned to you. (Seriously! Doncha love it!)

I wrote to him, enclosed a photo of the rifle, and explained that I had purchased the rifle. Got a nice letter back- he is long retired, remembered the rifle fondly, told me about the repair to the toe of the stock, asked me how I liked it, had I shot it, etc.

I have sort of had a similar feeling in some museums. At the Infantry Museum at Ft. Benning is Herman Goering's shotgun. Have seen MacArthur's sidearm (and Gen Eisenhower's) at the National Firearms Museum). My Best Man bought a drilling that turned out to have belonged to Manfred Von Richthofen (the Red Baron) and I got to HOLD Robert E. Lee's revolver many years ago.

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