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Old 05-04-2012, 11:38 AM   #51
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A little cleshea but the colt peace keeper ive always loved black powder guns

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Old 05-04-2012, 04:23 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyShackleford101 View Post
Yeah actually Germany got the u.s with the 03 in the clips. The bolt, and some action components looked very similar, but the clips were virtually identical.
Many of the old military rifles used the same clips... The Mauser, Arisaka (T38 and T99), M1903, M1917, and Im sure theres more, those are the only ones I know about.....
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Old 05-31-2012, 05:52 PM   #53
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I would have to say the Remington 1858 used in the war between the states. this fire arm was used on both sides.
and dispite the fallacy of so called historians that the frame of the gun was made from brass due to scarce supply's of steel and iron on the contrary several manufacturers of the south built them from steel and one southern manufacturer case hardened the frames in fact the south had better 1858 models than the Union troops, well with the exception of the ones built from brass.
fire arm from that era is very intriguing to me.
I also like the Smith and Wesson Volcanic lever action pistol originally designed by Walter Hunt that used rocket ball ammo, The Henry lever action rifle was a direct result of this pistol.

Another one of my favorites that has a lot of history is The 30-06 Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR).

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Old 07-08-2012, 04:48 AM   #54
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One of the unsung game changing guns that made giant strides in civilizing the west is the Sharpes model 1863-1868 carbine. First used in the civil war as a linen cartridge gun, then converted to the first widely used center fired US military cartridge the 50-70 Government. The conversions were sent out west with the calvary and sold to the Texas Rangers. After the army adopted the Springfield model 1873, these Sharpes carbine were sold for next to nothing to the settlers, wagon trains, trappers, gold prospectors, ect. Ammunition was free at many army forts if the ammo was used to shoot buffalo or the indians. Not politically correct these days. However a rifle that can truely take its rightful place in the list of the true guns that won the west.

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Old 07-08-2012, 07:12 PM   #55
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My great great gpa worked for the UP Railroad around Fort Wallace, Kansas as it was built west into Colorado in 1870. He shot buffalo to feed the rail workers and the 400 or so soldiers at the fort. Fort Wallace supplied him with the ammo, and he was paid $1 per head to kill buffalo. His writings say he killed about 70 head per day. He used the .50-70 Smith Conversion that I posted. Figure the time value of money on that.

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Old 07-08-2012, 10:32 PM   #56
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I wish I had one... Those bolts are the smoothest, and I like how they reload, you dont even have to open the bolt...

If im not mistaken, It was the 1903 that "stole" the Mauser clip design. Our Krags were no match for the Mauser, it could be reloaded quicker than our Krag. So we made our own "Mauser" the 1903, Pretty much a combination of a Mauser and Krag, we kept the Mag cut-off and bolt design, but the rest was pretty much Mauser... The US even had to pay Mauser for the design of the '03..

The Garand uses "EN-Bloc" clips, originally held ten rounds of the Peterson cartridge, but eventually became 8 rds of .30-06..

The Garand safety is in the trigger guard.. Isnt the AK on the side of the receiver? Ive only shot a couple of AR's and I think everything is in weird spots.. I dont like them at all...
They actually designed a stripper-feeding Krag but it was already an obsolete rifle, the single shot repeater, all things considered. Usually folk refer to the weakness of the Krag as its cartridge which I think is misplaced due partially to enemy arms and ammo.

"Cream-Puff" is how the .30-40 was described to me when I went to buy one at an antique gun show as a kid. Well, it isn't really, especially considering most soldiers don't actually fire long distances. However, the 7mm Mauser the gun faced off against in the Spanish-American War was, and is, an outstanding cartridge! I believe that some of the "being undergunned" came from the fact that primarily only the regular US Army regiments had Krags and the US Volunteers were still equipped with .45-70's Trapdoors by and large -- the latter were CLEARLY undergunned.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:00 AM   #57
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What is my favorite historical firearm?

That's a tough question, but at the moment I would have to go with the pre '64 Winchester Model 70. I think the pre '64 represents the end of an era in rifle manufacturing. Winchester modified the model 70 in '64 so that it would be cheaper to manufacture and remain competitive with rifles such as the Remington 700, which was made using cheaper methods. That was a necessary change if Winchester wanted to stay in business. It was only a matter of time before the model 70 would be priced completely out of the market because of its manufacturing process. So they changed it and the changes didn't go over very well. No one was happy with Winchester modifying what was considered by many the best bolt action rifle in order to make it cheaper.

That would be a tough position to be in. Change your product which many consider to be the best ever, or be priced out of the market.

From that point on more and more guns have moved closer to becoming disposable items just like all of the other products in our society. I'm not saying that it's wrong to make products cheaper or even disposable. Many of today's rifles are more accurate than ever and they are more affordable than ever. But I will say that our attitudes and values as a nation have changed, and that change is reflected in the changes made to model 70 in '64.

For me the pre '64 Model 70 represents the and of an era. It represents the end of the old ways and the post '64 represents the beginning of the new ways. Only time will tell if that change is for better or worse, but either way it was signification. So for the moment the model pre '64 is my favorite historical firearm because of the larger changes that it represents.

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:15 AM   #58
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the guns of the mid to late 1800's would be some of my favorite historical firearms. also the firearms and weapons of WWII would be a secondary favorite too.

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Old 07-09-2012, 05:28 AM   #59
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How can you have a favorite? I like any thing that shoots or can be made to shoot. These just happen to be interesting guns.


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Old 07-09-2012, 03:05 PM   #60
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Classy, Durango, classy.

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