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Old 04-18-2014, 08:54 PM   #191
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Originally Posted by seancslaughter View Post
And who can stab a bear to death


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Several write ups on this when doing a search.

Here's one.

Back in the late 1800's when the Mississippi Delta was a Hunter's Paradise, General Wade Hampton owned substantial plantation there and he spent a great deal of time hunting black bear. General Hampton's hunting method was to pursue the bear with a pack of dogs and bring it to bay. He would then provoke a charge, standing his ground with nothing but an Arkansas Toothpick. As the bear charged, General Hampton would dart to one side and plunge his knife into the bear's heart. Allegedly General Hampton killed nearly 100 bear in that manner without ever getting so much as a scratch.
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Old 04-18-2014, 09:33 PM   #192
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Personally I don't doubt he would kill bears with a knife if he could do this.

On the third day of the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, Hampton led his troopers into the massive cavalry clash east of the main field of battle. Although suffering from a saber wound to the head from the previous day, Hampton's fighting this day would be no less than exemplary. At the peak of the fighting, Hampton shot three Federal troopers from their horses and ran a fourth through with his sword. Seeing one of his own horsemen surrounded and battling several assailants alone, Hampton charged to the trooper's aid and knocked one Federal from his saddle. Receiving another saber wound to the head, with his own blood clouding his eyes, Hampton killed several more blue troopers while defending himself and his man. He cleaved the skull of one down to the chin with a solitary blow from his massive blade. Before leaving the field, Hampton would also receive a severe shrapnel wound in his side.

Characterizing Hampton's legend among the Federals, one Union officer admitted, "With his wonderful powers of physical endurance, his alert, vigilant mind, his matchless horsemanship, no obstacles seemed to baffle his audacity or thwart his purpose." At no time was this more true than on March 10, 1865, when Hampton (now a Lt. General since February 15) charged into a force of 70 Federal cavalrymen with only five of his own. Personally killing no less than three of the 13 northerners killed, he also captured 12 more as the others ran off, thereby demonstrating the veracity of the northern view that "he would hunt his antagonist as he would hunt big game in the forest. The celerity and audacity of his movements against the front, sometimes on the flank, then again in the rear, kept his enemies in a constant state of uncertainty and anxiety as to where and when they might expect him." The southern loss in the engagement was listed as "one horse."

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Old 04-18-2014, 09:56 PM   #193
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You can read the Iliad and get a lot of daring-do out of that as well.

I myself am more impressed by the generalship not the daring-do.

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Old 04-18-2014, 10:43 PM   #194
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You can read the Iliad and get a lot of daring-do out of that as well.

I myself am more impressed by the generalship not the daring-do.
Fiction daring do vs truth.
How many 3 star generals are out front leading the way in today's army.
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Old 04-19-2014, 04:37 PM   #195
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Don't want to de-rail this thread. Will make an OP on debunking the Little Big Horn myth.
I am interested.
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Old 04-19-2014, 04:47 PM   #196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threetango View Post
Fiction daring do vs truth.
How many 3 star generals are out front leading the way in today's army.
Patton did. And Puller did.

Occasionally generals keep their lust for battle.

Custer did also. But at Little Bighorn, Custer underestimated Sitting Bull and that cost him his life and a thankless place in military history.

Custer was a brave man. He just made one mistake.

Sort of like the Imperial Japanese Empire -- a very brave people -- just one little mistake on Dec 7 1941 -- they did not finish the job. Different war -- different mistake.
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Old 04-19-2014, 05:14 PM   #197
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Quote:
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Sort of like the Imperial Japanese Empire -- a very brave people -- just one little mistake on Dec 7 1941 -- they did not finish the job. Different war -- different mistake.
Where did that come from? The Japanese had done all they could to P.H. They weren't allowed to 'finish the job', and the weather turned bad.

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Can we get back on topic please???
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Old 04-20-2014, 01:02 PM   #198
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Default A Different Perspective On The Little Bighorn Battle

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Old 04-20-2014, 07:55 PM   #199
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Back to Civil War history or as the Southern ladies called it for many years afterward. "The Late Unpleasantness".
A guy I enjoyed reading about and did a presentation on at the First Sergeant's Academy at Ft Bliss when going through the course many years ago.

Col.John S. Mosby (The Grey Ghost).

From the link.

Mosby’s exploits included a daring raid far inside Union lines at the Fairfax County courthouse in 1863, where his raiders captured some key Union officers, including General Stoughton, whom Mosby found in bed, waking him with a slap to his rear. Upon being so roused, the general exclaimed, "Do you know who I am?" Mosby quickly replied, "Do you know Mosby, general?" "Yes! Have you got the rascal?" "No but he has got you!"

link

http://www.old-picture.com/defining-moments/Grey-Ghost.htm

Disbanded his troops rather than surrender.

http://historical.ha.com/c/item.zx?saleNo=6039&lotNo=35105

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Old 08-21-2014, 11:59 PM   #200
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slavery was not even an issue when war broke out.
the whole premise for the south to go to war was they wanted to be recognized by the union as their own sovereign states independent from the federal government but the federal government wasn't having it. slavery became an issue when the union started recruiting the slave population

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